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Moderated Forums => Faith Issues => Topic started by: GabrieltheCelt on January 28, 2013, 06:33:15 PM

Title: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on January 28, 2013, 06:33:15 PM
Just a simple poll on how often you read from the Bible*.  If you like, please include which version you're most likely to use, as well as how you read the Bible ex. Daily Lectionary, your own study guide, etc...


*By "Bible", I mean either reading from a physical Bible or electronic (email, e-Reader, etc...)  Bible.

 I chose option 2.  I typically don't read from any Lectionary.  The Bible I'm most comfortable with is The New Oxford Annotated Bible and The Orthodox Bible Study Companion Series Commentary by Fr. Lawrence R. Farley.  My wonderful In-Laws bought me the four Synoptic Gospels in this series for Christmas.

Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: theistgal on January 28, 2013, 06:34:20 PM
I'm not really sure how to respond. I don't sit down with a Bible and read it "straight", so to speak. But I do try to read the Epistle and Gospel of the day whenever I can.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on January 28, 2013, 06:39:55 PM
I'm not really sure how to respond. I don't sit down with a Bible and read it "straight", so to speak. But I do try to read the Epistle and Gospel of the day whenever I can.

 I believe you're referring to a Lectionary (the appointed daily Epistle and Gospel verses).  Using the answers in the poll, how often would you say "whenever I can" ends up being?
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: pmpn8rGPT on January 28, 2013, 06:41:31 PM
Many people (myself included) have a "morning and evening lesson" where you read from Scripture when you wake up and retire.  Just as food for thought, you might want to add a "twice daily" option :)
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Arachne on January 28, 2013, 07:23:49 PM
Being Greek, I don't need a NT translation. :) I've had my copy since I was 8-9, and it's well worn by now. My OT is Septuagint, but I haven't given it nearly as much time.

The Gospels are my favourite bits, and I can sit down and read them straight, especially around Christmas, for some reason. Most of the time, though, I read Lectionary style. I enjoy The Lord's Voice (http://www.apostoliki-diakonia.gr/en_main/fk/fk.asp) (the Greek archives go back to 2001) and the Dynamis meditations (http://www.dynamispublications.org/).

I can go several days without reading, but I'm a completionist and so I always manage to catch up.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Nigula Qian Zishi on January 28, 2013, 08:22:54 PM
I read the Orthodox New Testament for English study since it is the most accurate version to the original Greek:
The Orthodox New Testament (The Holy Gospels) (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0944359175/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0944359175&linkCode=as2&tag=yourcatholicmess)
The Orthodox New Testament (Acts, Epistles, and Revelation)  (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0944359183/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0944359183&linkCode=as2&tag=yourcatholicmess)
Some people dislike the woodenly literalness, but that is exactly why I like it.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Peacemaker on January 29, 2013, 03:24:01 PM
Considering it's a sin not to read from it daily, I try the best I can.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Hinterlander on January 29, 2013, 03:53:32 PM
Last September I started a Bible Reading Plan offered by St. Andrews Orthodox Church (Fr. Josiah Trenham).

Here is the link to a helpful check-off list of readings: http://www.saintandrew.net/files/Bible%20Plan/St.AndrewOrthodoxBibleReadingPlan.pdf (http://www.saintandrew.net/files/Bible%20Plan/St.AndrewOrthodoxBibleReadingPlan.pdf)

When I started this project I was worried I would become "legalistic" or that it would take me too much time.

In fact, I have had no problem actually "getting ahead" and then not reading very much for a week or two.

Currently, I am about 1/3rd of the way through the Bible Reading plan.

I use the OSB.  Before my inquiry into Orthodoxy began I read mostly the NKJV - so the OSB is pretty recognizable.

I am tempted to purchase Blessed Theophylact's commentaries to enrich my reading and reflection the Gospels.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Peacemaker on January 29, 2013, 04:08:34 PM
^^^ That's good,

Here is one from Optina

One chapter from the Gospel in order, beginning first with the Gospel of Matthew, to the last chapter of the Gospel of John, and two chapters from the Epistle, likewise in order, beginning with the Acts of the holy Apostles and ending with the last chapter of the Apocalypse of Saint John the Theologian. The last seven chapters of the Apocalypse are read one a day. In this way the last chapter is read on exactly the same day as the last chapter of the Gospel of John. Then, after the completion of the reading of the whole New Testament, in this manner they begin again from the first chapters a new cycle of reading in precisely the same order. From the Psalter they read one kathisma a day, beginning with the first and ending with the last.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: orthonorm on January 29, 2013, 05:17:05 PM
With a Grain of Salt:

I think reading the Scriptures from beginning to end, so to speak, isn't the best idea.

I follow a rule that is not unlike many other folks.

Each day:

A chapter from one of the Gospels (I would go from Mark, Matthew, Luke, John). Once you get through them. Repeat.
A chapter from one of the Epistles. Once finished, then Acts, the Apocalypse. Then repeat.
A couple to a handful of Psalms each day. Repeat when finished.
A chapter from an OT book.

The OT though is something where I think guidance is needed, but starting in Genesis is great as is moving to Exodus, then Deuteronomy.

After that, I would move to Isaiah and then the other Prophets. (Along the way I would read a verse or two from Proverbs in my daily reading.)

After that I would probably repeat that sequence again. Then take up what ever strikes your fancy OTwise.

That is my opinion and one shared by more than a few I have spoken with Orthodox and otherwise. In fact, Fr. Thomas Hopko suggests nearly as much.

Some of the OT can get tedious and confusing. Also, these selections above really will bring out the clearly Christological nature of reading the OT which will conform to the reading you are doing of the Church Fathers.

Again, with whatever size piece of salt you wish to take it with.

EDIT: Regarding the Epistles, I would save Romans for last. Just because it is the most nuanced and "theological" of the Epistles. Again, I hope you do not take this as condescension. Just my experience and what has been shared with me by folks I respect.

Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Cyrillic on January 29, 2013, 05:22:54 PM
Being Greek, I don't need a NT translation. :) I've had my copy since I was 8-9, and it's well worn by now. My OT is Septuagint, but I haven't given it nearly as much time.

The Gospels are my favourite bits, and I can sit down and read them straight, especially around Christmas, for some reason. Most of the time, though, I read Lectionary style. I enjoy The Lord's Voice (http://www.apostoliki-diakonia.gr/en_main/fk/fk.asp) (the Greek archives go back to 2001) and the Dynamis meditations (http://www.dynamispublications.org/).

I can go several days without reading, but I'm a completionist and so I always manage to catch up.

Same here. Translations are for wussies  :)
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Asteriktos on January 29, 2013, 05:25:09 PM
Quote
How often do you read from the Bible?

Ideally? Daily.

Realistically? Depends on the week...  :-[
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Velsigne on January 29, 2013, 09:02:31 PM
For full disclosure, technically, I'm 'reading' from the Bible every time I pray a Psalm, but I am working on the reading daily readings part.  For instance, I could be reading the Bible right now instead of posting this.  Hmm...

Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Hinterlander on January 29, 2013, 09:14:59 PM
Last September I started a Bible Reading Plan offered by St. Andrews Orthodox Church (Fr. Josiah Trenham).

Here is the link to a helpful check-off list of readings: http://www.saintandrew.net/files/Bible%20Plan/St.AndrewOrthodoxBibleReadingPlan.pdf (http://www.saintandrew.net/files/Bible%20Plan/St.AndrewOrthodoxBibleReadingPlan.pdf)

To clarify, the above plan features a daily OT, Psalm, Proverb, and NT reading.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: pmpn8rGPT on January 29, 2013, 09:33:48 PM
Being Greek, I don't need a NT translation. :) I've had my copy since I was 8-9, and it's well worn by now. My OT is Septuagint, but I haven't given it nearly as much time.

The Gospels are my favourite bits, and I can sit down and read them straight, especially around Christmas, for some reason. Most of the time, though, I read Lectionary style. I enjoy The Lord's Voice (http://www.apostoliki-diakonia.gr/en_main/fk/fk.asp) (the Greek archives go back to 2001) and the Dynamis meditations (http://www.dynamispublications.org/).

I can go several days without reading, but I'm a completionist and so I always manage to catch up.
I'm Greek and I have yet to learn Greek.  I tried to but then I started to learn about Hebrew and I was hooked. 

Also, slightly off topic, can you give me a reference to where you have gotten your copy of the LXX?  I've been trying to find a copy of The Dead Sea Scrolls in its original languages (Hebrew/Aramaic), I'm going to ASSume that they have a copy  :)
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: KBN1 on January 29, 2013, 09:42:10 PM
More than I used to.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: GTAsoldier on January 29, 2013, 10:02:49 PM
I read the Orthodox New Testament for English study since it is the most accurate version to the original Greek:
The Orthodox New Testament (The Holy Gospels) (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0944359175/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0944359175&linkCode=as2&tag=yourcatholicmess)
The Orthodox New Testament (Acts, Epistles, and Revelation)  (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0944359183/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0944359183&linkCode=as2&tag=yourcatholicmess)
Some people dislike the woodenly literalness, but that is exactly why I like it.

Speaking of the EOB, the NT is finally finished and a EOB+ app has been made for the iPhone (which I just bought for $2.99)

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/eastern-orthodox-bible-+/id538166793?mt=8

It's great thus far.

- Jade
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Fr.Aidan on January 29, 2013, 10:04:53 PM
Always prefer the Douay-Rheims translation.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: yeshuaisiam on January 29, 2013, 10:41:24 PM
Bible reading is very important without a doubt, and I believe it would help most Christians to read and reflect on the scriptures, even if a few verses, every day.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: JamesR on January 29, 2013, 10:49:23 PM
Usually at least once a day. I'll read a few chapters from a Gospel or Epistle and then recite Psalms throughout the day for prayers. Every once in a while I'll also open up an OT book to read as well. I use the OSB, I don't see what's wrong with it. I don't take the notes as authoritive anyway. When I get a question about a word or concept, I either look it up online from an authoritive Orthodox site or I'll search the word in my English-Greek concordance.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Cyrillic on January 30, 2013, 06:00:49 AM
Every once in a while I'll also open up an OT book to read as well. I use the OSB, I don't see what's wrong with it.

Their translation of the Septuagint is absolutely horrible.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: adampjr on January 30, 2013, 06:06:56 AM
I read every day.

I was raised that way, if there is one thing I still think Protestants get absolutely right (there are a few others as well), it is their zeal for reading teh Scriptures.
I used to have my own various reading plans.

Now that I am an inquirer, I am reading according to this page's lectionary: http://oca.org/readings
I want to do that for at least one year.

Additionally, sometimes I will go through a book straight so I don't ever miss anything.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I am under the impression that not every verse is accounted for in the lectionary.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: FlickFlack on January 30, 2013, 06:10:19 AM
Rarely, since I found out of all the negativeness from it. I read it in my own language as translated by Bartolomeu Anania, RIP. †
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Arachne on January 30, 2013, 06:29:25 AM
Being Greek, I don't need a NT translation. :) I've had my copy since I was 8-9, and it's well worn by now. My OT is Septuagint, but I haven't given it nearly as much time.

The Gospels are my favourite bits, and I can sit down and read them straight, especially around Christmas, for some reason. Most of the time, though, I read Lectionary style. I enjoy The Lord's Voice (http://www.apostoliki-diakonia.gr/en_main/fk/fk.asp) (the Greek archives go back to 2001) and the Dynamis meditations (http://www.dynamispublications.org/).

I can go several days without reading, but I'm a completionist and so I always manage to catch up.
I'm Greek and I have yet to learn Greek.  I tried to but then I started to learn about Hebrew and I was hooked. 

Also, slightly off topic, can you give me a reference to where you have gotten your copy of the LXX?  I've been trying to find a copy of The Dead Sea Scrolls in its original languages (Hebrew/Aramaic), I'm going to ASSume that they have a copy  :)

Well, I was born in Greece and lived there for 35 years. That helped (with lots of reading!). ;)

As for my LXX copy, I got this (http://www.apostoliki-diakonia.gr/bookshop/ItemDetails.aspx?ItemCode=99.01.001) when it was first published (in the 90s).
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on January 30, 2013, 06:34:35 AM
Quote
How often do you read from the Bible?

Ideally? Daily.

Realistically? Depends on the week...  :-[


That's me also.



Selam
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Kerdy on January 30, 2013, 07:36:05 AM
I don't read anything as much as I should or as much as I once did, including the bible.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: AustralianDiaspora on January 30, 2013, 09:57:57 AM
Quote
How often do you read from the Bible?

Ideally? Daily.

Realistically? Depends on the week...  :-[


That's me also.



Selam
Me too. Lately I've been able to maintain daily reading, though I tend to read for a few minutes and get restless, so I put it aside and come back to it. I also read the daily readings. My Priest started me in the New Testament (Matthew I assume? from memory) when he gave me a copy of the OSB (bless him, it's truly an amazing gift though I can't comment on the criticism of how it translates!)
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Dominika on January 30, 2013, 10:39:24 AM
I read one chapter (or a part of the chapter - it depends on its length) from Old or New Testament daily. (usually in Polish). When I finish one book, I start reading another one, but not in particular order. E.g during last Advent I read the Isaiah Book (I thought it's great as it contains many prophecies about Messiah), and after it some letters of st. Paul. For sure I'll choose something special for Great Lent (during Holy Week I follow Church readings) and during Holy 50 days I'll be reading the Apostles Act.

And I pray by one psalm (in Serbian) every day (not from Cathismas, but it's my own order - the first day - first psalm, the second day - second psalm, 150th day - 150th psalm and after it again from the beginning). Of course and again, during Holy Week I follow the Church with the cathismas

The rule of 1 psalm + a piece of Bible book I was given by my priest.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: JamesR on January 30, 2013, 12:59:43 PM
Every once in a while I'll also open up an OT book to read as well. I use the OSB, I don't see what's wrong with it.

Their translation of the Septuagint is absolutely horrible.

Any translation you would recommend for an English speaker?
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: orthonorm on January 30, 2013, 01:34:37 PM
Every once in a while I'll also open up an OT book to read as well. I use the OSB, I don't see what's wrong with it.

Their translation of the Septuagint is absolutely horrible.

Any translation you would recommend for an English speaker?

Don't hung up on the Septuagints.

Your OT is just fine.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: jah777 on January 30, 2013, 01:47:38 PM
Every once in a while I'll also open up an OT book to read as well. I use the OSB, I don't see what's wrong with it.

Their translation of the Septuagint is absolutely horrible.

Any translation you would recommend for an English speaker?

Michael Asser's translation is good, but currently only available electronically:

http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/zot.htm
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Cyrillic on January 30, 2013, 02:29:41 PM
Every once in a while I'll also open up an OT book to read as well. I use the OSB, I don't see what's wrong with it.

Their translation of the Septuagint is absolutely horrible.

Any translation you would recommend for an English speaker?

Don't hung up on the Septuagints.

Your OT is just fine.

This is a fine advice. However, if you're a Septuagint geek like me than there's always the NETS. It's available for free on the internet (http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/nets/edition/). It reads better and is far more accurate. The OSB uses the MT for psalm 22 (23) for example and completely ignores the LXX. However, the problem with the NETS is that it was translated by somewhat liberal theologians who obscured some passages which refer to the Holy Trinity (the most obvious example being the Spirit of God in Genesis 1 which was rendered "a divine wind" - not a wrong translation grammatically speaking, because πνεύμα θεοῦ can mean divine wind as well but it's slightly misleading since the more obvious and correct choice would be "the Spirit of God" - the usual word for wind in Greek being ἄνεμος). Also, the literal transliteration of names in the NETS and anachronistically using the Erasmian pronounciation is quite annoying. Instead of David you'll get Dauid.

I don't know which text the OSB uses but the NETS uses the Göttingen Septuagint as far as it's available, which is the best critical text out there. But then again, if you aren't an Septuagint geek the OSB would do just fine.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: soderquj on January 30, 2013, 03:05:18 PM
i use the OSB and the Daily reading app.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Cyrillic on January 30, 2013, 03:10:22 PM
Just a simple poll on how often you read from the Bible*.  If you like, please include which version you're most likely to use, as well as how you read the Bible ex. Daily Lectionary, your own study guide, etc...


Whenever I feel like it. Which can range from a few times every day to a few times a month. I prefer to use the "Herziene Statenvertaling" version when using a translation, which is basically the dutch equivalent of the NKJV. I use no lectionary or anything like that.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: William on January 30, 2013, 08:12:19 PM
This is a fine advice.

This is fine advice*
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: pmpn8rGPT on January 30, 2013, 08:18:16 PM
Being Greek, I don't need a NT translation. :) I've had my copy since I was 8-9, and it's well worn by now. My OT is Septuagint, but I haven't given it nearly as much time.

The Gospels are my favourite bits, and I can sit down and read them straight, especially around Christmas, for some reason. Most of the time, though, I read Lectionary style. I enjoy The Lord's Voice (http://www.apostoliki-diakonia.gr/en_main/fk/fk.asp) (the Greek archives go back to 2001) and the Dynamis meditations (http://www.dynamispublications.org/).

I can go several days without reading, but I'm a completionist and so I always manage to catch up.
I'm Greek and I have yet to learn Greek.  I tried to but then I started to learn about Hebrew and I was hooked. 

Also, slightly off topic, can you give me a reference to where you have gotten your copy of the LXX?  I've been trying to find a copy of The Dead Sea Scrolls in its original languages (Hebrew/Aramaic), I'm going to ASSume that they have a copy  :)

Well, I was born in Greece and lived there for 35 years. That helped (with lots of reading!). ;)

As for my LXX copy, I got this (http://www.apostoliki-diakonia.gr/bookshop/ItemDetails.aspx?ItemCode=99.01.001) when it was first published (in the 90s).
thanks..
my computer is having problems right now so I'll be sure to investigate the site whenever it cools down.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Punch on January 30, 2013, 09:05:38 PM
I read one chapter (or a part of the chapter - it depends on its length) from Old or New Testament daily. (usually in Polish). When I finish one book, I start reading another one, but not in particular order. E.g during last Advent I read the Isaiah Book (I thought it's great as it contains many prophecies about Messiah), and after it some letters of st. Paul. For sure I'll choose something special for Great Lent (during Holy Week I follow Church readings) and during Holy 50 days I'll be reading the Apostles Act.

And I pray by one psalm (in Serbian) every day (not from Cathismas, but it's my own order - the first day - first psalm, the second day - second psalm, 150th day - 150th psalm and after it again from the beginning). Of course and again, during Holy Week I follow the Church with the cathismas

The rule of 1 psalm + a piece of Bible book I was given by my priest.

If you find an English "Book of Common Prayer', the Psalms are laid out by date of the month, morning and evening, and will get you through the Psalter in 30 days.  Yes, I know they are numbered in the "Orthodox" way, but I read them anyway.  I also have a book numbered the same way that also gives the Gregorian notation for the Psalms.  I find singing them in the manner that they were intended (they are songs after all) a bit more uplifting than rambling through them as fast as I can go as I hear in many Orthodox Churches.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Fr.Aidan on January 30, 2013, 09:32:24 PM
What is this book to which you refer, which gives the tones for them?
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Cyrillic on January 31, 2013, 02:33:41 PM
This is a fine advice.

This is fine advice*

 :-[
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Punch on January 31, 2013, 06:08:35 PM
What is this book to which you refer, which gives the tones for them?

St. Dunstan's Plainsong Psalter.  Should be able to find it on Google.  If not, let me know and I will send more information.

BTW - Congrats on the Warning.  Seems like everyone that I respect gets at least one.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Fr.Aidan on January 31, 2013, 07:17:40 PM
The statement was made, "I find singing them in the manner that they were intended."

The tones as given in the St. Dunstan's book represent not the way that the Orthodox of the West intended or chanted them, but the way which the Protestants devised to intend or chant them.

The tones themselves are ancient, but the assignment of which tone to which psalm, is from the Protestant Tradition.

I am not criticizing Protestant or WR Orthodox liturgics, but clarifying that this is not the original way in which the psalms were chanted historically, since that seems to be the impression you had received.

Thank you for your congratulatory note. I will try to spend my time in purgatory profitably, respectfully, and above all compliantly.  :)
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: William on January 31, 2013, 07:26:40 PM
This is a fine advice.

This is fine advice*

 :-[

Not nitpicking, I just think correcting errors will help iron out the few flaws in your near-perfect English. If you'd rather I didn't I won't.
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Punch on January 31, 2013, 07:28:46 PM
I think you misunderstood what I meant by "intended".  Psalms were hymns sung by the Jewish church, and were intended to be sung and not just read quickly through.  What tones are / were / should be used, I could really care less, and am far from qualified to debate.  Yes, the tones in that particular book would most likely be based on Anglican tradition.  They are somewhat different than the ones that I have in a Lutheran Prayer Book (The Brotherhood Prayer Book) which also uses Gregorian tones for the Psalms, but the differences would not be that noticeable to someone who did not know this kind of music.  However, I have heard the same tones used by Roman Catholics, so I am not so sure that they are necessarily Protestant.

The statement was made, "I find singing them in the manner that they were intended."

The tones as given in the St. Dunstan's book represent not the way that the Orthodox of the West intended or chanted them, but the way which the Protestants devised to intend or chant them.

The tones themselves are ancient, but the assignment of which tone to which psalm, is from the Protestant Tradition.

I am not criticizing Protestant or WR Orthodox liturgics, but clarifying that this is not the original way in which the psalms were chanted historically, since that seems to be the impression you had received.

Thank you for your congratulatory note. I will try to spend my time in purgatory profitably, respectfully, and above all compliantly.  :)
Title: Re: Poll: Bible Reading
Post by: Fr.Aidan on January 31, 2013, 07:46:06 PM
Again, the tones themselves, the melodic formulae given in the St. Dunstan's Plainsong Psalter, are ancient and date to the West's Orthodox period.