OrthodoxChristianity.net

Moderated Forums => Oriental Orthodox Discussion => Topic started by: Salpy on March 09, 2012, 03:32:43 AM

Title: Upcoming Lecture About Newly-Discovered Armenian Mosaics in Jerusalem
Post by: Salpy on March 09, 2012, 03:32:43 AM
Quote
Professor Abraham Terian will present a lecture on a newly-discovered Armenian mosaic on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem. The mosaic, which has been dated to the sixth century at the latest, is significant because it sheds light on the role of Armenians, their churches, monasteries and other activites in ancient Jerusalem.

Dr. Terian, who grew up in Jerusalem and was an archaeologist before he became a theologian, will relate the latest discoveries to those known for more than a century, and will comment on their artistic, religious and paleographic significance.

The lecture will take place at the Seminary on Thursday, March 22 at 7:30PM.

The new finding is also highly significant because the mosaic contains a short inscription which is among the oldest surviving examples of Armenian writing anywhere.

http://www.stnersess.edu/news/article.php?id=335&utm_source=Eastern+Diocese+E-Newsletter&utm_campaign=96e2206777-February_9_20122_9_2012&utm_medium=email


(http://www.stnersess.edu/images/uploads/2012-03%20ArmenianMosaic.jpg)
Title: Re: Upcoming Lecture About Newly-Discovered Armenian Mosaics in Jerusalem
Post by: biro on March 09, 2012, 10:12:50 AM
That looks very interesting. Wish I could go!   :angel:
Title: Re: Upcoming Lecture About Newly-Discovered Armenian Mosaics in Jerusalem
Post by: CoptoGeek on March 09, 2012, 11:16:21 AM
That looks very interesting. Wish I could go!   :angel:

It would be great if all these lectures were streamed through livestream.com or ustream.com, etc and archived.
Title: Re: Upcoming Lecture About Newly-Discovered Armenian Mosaics in Jerusalem
Post by: ialmisry on March 09, 2012, 08:20:38 PM

The new finding is also highly significant because the mosaic contains a short inscription which is among the oldest surviving examples of Armenian writing anywhere.
If from the sixth century they would also be interesting of a non-Chalcedonian inscription deep in the heart of the Chalcedonian Empire, from a nation outside the Empire.