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Moderated Forums => Other Topics => Topic started by: Aindriú on July 19, 2011, 09:56:45 PM

Title: Word of the day
Post by: Aindriú on July 19, 2011, 09:56:45 PM
I'll start us off. Inspired by our own pensateomnia, the current word of the day is lacuna.

la·cu·na
noun \lə-ˈkü-nə, -ˈkyü-\
plural la·cu·nae also la·cu·nas

Definition of LACUNA

1
: a blank space or a missing part : gap <the evident lacunae in his story — Shirley Hazzard>; also : deficiency 1 <despite all these lacunae, those reforms were a vast improvement — New Republic>
2
: a small cavity, pit, or discontinuity in an anatomical structure
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: orthonorm on July 19, 2011, 10:00:59 PM
To add its importance in popular culture, it was the name of the business in the The Eternal Sunshine of Spotless Mind which removed people's memories.

Superb film.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 20, 2011, 02:15:52 PM
fancy Dan

One given to flamboyant display especially of technique or dress

First Known Use: circa 1943
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: primuspilus on July 20, 2011, 03:55:14 PM
Quote
fancy Dan
Also had a VERY brief revival due to an episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

primuspilus
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 20, 2011, 03:56:32 PM
Quote
fancy Dan
Also had a VERY brief revival due to an episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

primuspilus

That's where I know it from  :D ;D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: primuspilus on July 20, 2011, 04:01:55 PM
Quote
That's where I know it from

AH! Another fan...oh goodie!

Viva old Dax :)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Aindriú on July 20, 2011, 04:24:11 PM
Viva old Dax :)

lol

Crossthread points!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: primuspilus on July 20, 2011, 04:29:09 PM
Quote
lol

Crossthread points!

*bows deeply*

primuspilus
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 28, 2011, 05:03:12 AM
Circumscribed

1. subject to limits or subjected to limits

2. showing or determining a boundary
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on August 02, 2011, 03:37:49 PM
MacGyver

(verb) - to solve a problem in a creative, resourceful, typically "jury-rigged" fashion.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: primuspilus on August 02, 2011, 04:00:34 PM
MacGyver
Definition 2 - Most awesomest 80's haircut in existence.....

PP
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Aindriú on August 03, 2011, 08:25:31 PM
acerbic

a·cer·bic/əˈsərbik/Adjective
1. (esp. of a comment or style of speaking) Sharp and forthright.
2. Tasting sour or bitter.

It is really confusing when scrolling and I bump into Saint John of Damascus and I start reading a post and wonder where in the heck Isa is coming from, or wonder where the acerbic wit is, or the entire catalog of Rand McNally from the Garden of Eden to present in 33,346 x 24,764 pixels per map is.

//:=)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on August 10, 2011, 11:05:50 PM
Exute

(transitive verb) - to strip [a person] of; to divest or deprive of

Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on August 11, 2011, 04:20:13 PM
hypnagogic

(adjective) - of or pertaining to drowsiness; inducing drowsiness
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: orthonorm on August 11, 2011, 05:46:08 PM
hypnagogic

(adjective) - of or pertaining to drowsiness; inducing drowsiness

To be more precise it is the odd character of being one can experience in the not quite awake and not quite asleep state. Often it is pretty cool, until that darn hypnic jerk! gets in the way.

Many controlled and not yet controlled substances are often referred to hypnagogics due to the "similar" affect the can have on people.

Really a hypnagogic state can be induce in many ways: starvation, lack of sleep, monotony. Monastery much?
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: celticfan1888 on August 11, 2011, 10:00:06 PM
mormon - 97% of the people in Utah. .003% of the people anywhere else.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on September 02, 2011, 05:06:30 PM
Ecclesiarch

a person in charge of sacred things, generally at a church or monastery
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on September 20, 2011, 10:53:23 PM
phaggy time

When you suspect that someone is homosexual, or they are acting in a homosexual manner.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: celticfan1888 on September 21, 2011, 01:26:53 AM
Handsome - Daniel Mikaelson (Me)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on September 28, 2011, 02:01:42 AM
vacuity

1) the state of being vacuous or without contents; vacancy; emptiness,
2) absence of thought or intelligence; inanity; blankness
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Aindriú on October 04, 2011, 01:48:28 PM
Gustatory
gus·ta·to·ry     adj    \ˈgəs-tə-ˌtor-ē\

: relating to or associated with eating or the sense of taste

— gus·ta·to·ri·ly adverb
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Aindriú on October 05, 2011, 10:14:38 PM
vac·u·ous  adj  \ˈva-kyə-wəs\

Definition of VACUOUS

1
: emptied of or lacking content
2
: marked by lack of ideas or intelligence : stupid, inane <a vacuous mind> <a vacuous movie>
3
: devoid of serious occupation : idle
— vac·u·ous·ly adverb
— vac·u·ous·ness noun
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on October 06, 2011, 01:06:30 AM
vacularity

what it is when you make redundant posts on threads that really don't add anything to the threads and repeat stuff and are tautological and/or/and have nothing new to submit and are somewhat empty or don't help further the understanding and maybe possibly don't contribute
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Aindriú on November 02, 2011, 02:50:12 PM
bon·ho·mie
noun /ˈbänəˌmē/  /ˌbänəˈmē/ 

Cheerful friendliness; geniality
- he exuded good humor and bonhomie
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IsmiLiora on November 02, 2011, 09:57:45 PM
I word I knew at one point, filed in the back of my mind, and never used ever again.

I really need to expand my vocabulary. I applaud this thread!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: genesisone on November 03, 2011, 07:49:06 AM
May we never suffer from lethologica (http://www.wordnik.com/words/lethologica)!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: celticfan1888 on November 03, 2011, 10:26:01 AM
Football - a game played on a field between two teams of 11 players each with the object to propel a round ball into the opponent's goal by kicking or by hitting it with any part of the body except the hands and arms.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: AWR on November 03, 2011, 10:40:15 AM
Football - a game played on a field between two teams of 11 players each with the object to propel a round ball into the opponent's goal by kicking or by hitting it with any part of the body except the hands and arms.

Football is a sport played between two teams of eleven with the objective of scoring points by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone. The ball can be advanced by running with it or throwing it to a teammate. Points can be scored by carrying the ball over the opponent's goal line, catching a pass thrown over that goal line, kicking the ball through the opponent's goal posts or tackling an opposing ball carrier in his own end zone.


(sorry i could not help myself)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Aindriú on November 03, 2011, 11:11:53 AM
Football - a game played on a field between two teams of 11 players each with the object to propel a round ball into the opponent's goal by kicking or by hitting it with any part of the body except the hands and arms.

Football is a sport played between two teams of eleven with the objective of scoring points by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone. The ball can be advanced by running with it or throwing it to a teammate. Points can be scored by carrying the ball over the opponent's goal line, catching a pass thrown over that goal line, kicking the ball through the opponent's goal posts or tackling an opposing ball carrier in his own end zone.


(sorry i could not help myself)

And cheerleaders.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: scamandrius on November 03, 2011, 01:53:04 PM
sesquipedalophobia

   1. The fear of long words.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: scamandrius on November 03, 2011, 01:53:41 PM
Golf

--A good walk ruined.  (attributed to Mark Twain) ;D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IsmiLiora on November 03, 2011, 01:59:20 PM
mormon - 97% of the people in Utah. .003% of the people anywhere else.
I thought you said "Moron." at first. The second part made no sense.  ;D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: primuspilus on November 03, 2011, 03:43:18 PM
mormon - 97% of the people in Utah. .003% of the people anywhere else.
I thought you said "Moron." at first. The second part made no sense.  ;D
Not too far off.......
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Aindriú on November 04, 2011, 03:52:40 PM
The emasculation of boys and men continues apase.

a·pace  (əˈpeɪs)
adv.

1. At a rapid pace; swiftly.
2. In such a way or at such a speed as to keep up the requisite momentum; abreast.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: primuspilus on November 04, 2011, 04:17:18 PM
The emasculation of boys and men continues apase.

a·pace  (əˈpeɪs)
adv.

1. At a rapid pace; swiftly.
2. In such a way or at such a speed as to keep up the requisite momentum; abreast.
:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: celticfan1888 on November 08, 2011, 12:25:40 AM
Scouser
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: celticfan1888 on November 08, 2011, 12:26:40 AM
The second part made no sense.  ;D

I didnt make it up. lol

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=mormon
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 23, 2011, 08:11:10 PM
intellective

having power to understand; intelligent; cognitive; of or pertaining to the intellect
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: genesisone on December 23, 2011, 08:36:16 PM
declaim

source (http://www.wordnik.com/words/declaim)
    v. To deliver a formal recitation, especially as an exercise in rhetoric or elocution.
    v. To speak loudly and vehemently; inveigh.
    v. To utter or recite with rhetorical effect.


Used in Nassar's Divine Prayers and Services at points in Matins of December 25. Had to look it up myself. Not sure it's the best translation. With my priest's approval, changed to "proclaim (the marvel)" in accordance with other translations of the text  :).
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 25, 2011, 08:03:36 PM
mopery

1. listless, apathetic, or dejected behavior
2. violation of a minor or imaginary law or rule
3. exposing yourself to a blind person
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 26, 2011, 05:06:04 PM
aloof

a cross between a loser and a doof

example: "You don't want to be too aggressive when dating, but you also don't want the potential mate to think you're aloof"
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: orthonorm on December 26, 2011, 07:31:22 PM
aloof

a cross between a loser and a doof

example: "You don't want to be too aggressive when dating, but you also don't want the potential mate to think you're aloof"

NICE!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 26, 2011, 07:43:14 PM
I have to admit: I borrowed  it from a TV show from the 1990s, Salute Your Shorts  8) ;D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 28, 2011, 11:36:07 AM
supraconcisionally

being succinct; using few words to provide detailed information; see also the little used synonym concisely
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 29, 2011, 11:56:58 PM
verdure

greenness, e.g. in vibrant and healthy vegetation; vitality; vigor
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 31, 2011, 09:01:29 PM
clootie

Mainly Scottish

a name of the devil; a strip or piece of cloth; a rag or item of clothing; a piece of fabric used in the patching of clothes
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 01, 2012, 07:11:48 AM
particularize

to make particular; to mention specifically; to give a detailed treatment; to discuss in depth
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 02, 2012, 07:14:02 PM
shysty

what a shyster is; shady; untrustworthy; unethical
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 03, 2012, 10:36:19 PM
MacGyver

(verb) to improvise a solution to a complex or pressing problem using simple and seemingly unhelpful items

Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on January 04, 2012, 04:35:44 AM
tapotement
 
Pronunciation: /təˈpəʊtm(ə)nt/
noun
[mass noun]

    rapid and repeated striking of the body as a technique in massage.

Origin:

late 19th century: French, from tapoter 'to tap'

(From the Oxford Dictionaries (http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/tapotement))
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 04, 2012, 07:22:04 PM
indefatigable

someone being persistent or untiring in their efforts
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 06, 2012, 02:21:50 PM
exigency

the need, demand, or requirement intrinsic to a circumstance, condition, etc.; a case or situation that demands prompt action or remedy; emergency; requiring a great deal or more than is needed
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on January 06, 2012, 07:59:21 PM
iffy
 
Pronunciation: /ˈɪfi/
adjective (iffier, iffiest)
informal

    full of uncertainty; doubtful: the prospect for classes resuming next Wednesday seems iffy
    of doubtful quality or legality: a good wine merchant will change the iffy bottles for sound ones

http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/iffy
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 07, 2012, 11:18:19 PM
tepefy

to make or become tepid (ie. moderately warm; lukewarm)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 08, 2012, 05:06:16 PM
acculturate

to adopt the cultural traits or social patterns of another group
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on January 08, 2012, 11:29:08 PM
vituperative
 
Pronunciation: /vɪˈtjuːp(ə)rətɪv, vʌɪ-/
adjective

    bitter and abusive: a vituperative outburst

http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/vituperative
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 09, 2012, 08:16:59 AM
optate

to choose; to wish for; to desire
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 10, 2012, 08:02:29 AM
dissever

to sever; separate; to divide into parts
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on January 10, 2012, 03:27:26 PM
ageism
 
Pronunciation: /ˈeɪdʒɪz(ə)m/
noun
[mass noun]

    prejudice or discrimination on the grounds of a person’s age: ageism in recruitment is an increasing problem

Derivatives

ageist
adjective & noun

http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/ageism
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: celticfan1888 on January 10, 2012, 11:49:53 PM
ageism
 
Pronunciation: /ˈeɪdʒɪz(ə)m/
noun
[mass noun]

    prejudice or discrimination on the grounds of a person’s age: ageism in recruitment is an increasing problem

Derivatives

ageist
adjective & noun

http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/ageism

Someone did this to me on this site. XD
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 11, 2012, 12:42:34 PM
ambrosial

exceptionally pleasing to taste or smell; especially delicious or fragrant; worthy of the gods; divine
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 12, 2012, 07:00:12 AM
truncate
 
to shorten by cutting off a part; cut short
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 13, 2012, 11:46:43 AM
soliloquy

an utterance or discourse by a person who is talking to himself or herself or is disregardful of or oblivious to any hearers present (often used as a device in drama to disclose a character's innermost thoughts)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 14, 2012, 01:19:42 PM
thrall

a person who is in bondage; slave; a person who is morally or mentally enslaved by some power, influence, or the like
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 15, 2012, 04:02:38 AM
feruling

punishing a child by striking them (especially on the hand) with a rod, cane, or flat piece of wood
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 16, 2012, 12:13:42 PM
gait

the way someone runs or walks; the way a horse moves
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 17, 2012, 02:32:37 AM
corporeal

physical, material, of the body, substantive
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 18, 2012, 05:52:46 PM
inexorable

unyielding; unalterable; unmovable
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 19, 2012, 12:26:06 PM
intensate

to intensify
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Aindriú on February 28, 2012, 08:05:50 PM
tou·sle   [tou-zuhl]  , -sled, -sling, noun
verb (used with object)
1.
to disorder or dishevel: The wind tousled our hair.
2.
to handle roughly.
noun
3.
a disheveled or rumpled mass, especially of hair.
4.
a disordered, disheveled, or tangled condition.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Bigsinner on February 28, 2012, 09:02:47 PM
Fard
-to apply makeup to the face

Used in a sentence:  The young woman was ticketed for farding while driving.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on May 21, 2012, 12:23:20 AM
stochastic

of or pertaining to a process involving a randomly determined sequence of observations each of which is considered as a sample of one element from a probability distribution
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 07, 2012, 03:04:27 PM
fervid

heated, vehement in spirit or enthusiasm; burning; glowing; intensely hot
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on July 07, 2012, 03:25:05 PM
http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/american_english/subjacent?region=us

subjacent

Pronunciation: /səbˈjāsənt/
Definition of subjacent
adjective
technical

    situated below something else.

Derivatives

subjacency
noun

Origin:

late 16th century: from Latin subjacent- 'lying underneath', from sub- 'under' + jacere 'to lie'
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 07, 2012, 03:26:05 PM
Your post is subjacent to mine  ;D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on July 07, 2012, 03:38:53 PM
And now, mine is to yours.  :-*
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 08, 2012, 10:47:02 AM
And now, mine is to yours.  :-*

Touche!  ;D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 08, 2012, 10:49:24 AM
infarction

an infarct, or the formation of an infarct (a localized area of tissue, as in the heart or kidney, that is dying or dead, having been deprived of its blood supply because of an obstruction by embolism or thrombosis)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Ansgar on July 08, 2012, 11:11:23 AM
So Asteriktos, what religion did that guy establish?
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 08, 2012, 11:13:37 AM
So Asteriktos, what religion did that guy establish?

None that I know of... but if he did, I will find out about it!  ;D It's a pic of the poet/writer Paul Laurence Dunbar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Laurence_Dunbar).
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Ansgar on July 08, 2012, 11:44:12 AM
So Asteriktos, what religion did that guy establish?

None that I know of... but if he did, I will find out about it!  ;D It's a pic of the poet/writer Paul Laurence Dunbar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Laurence_Dunbar).
He sounds interesting.  :)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 09, 2012, 04:42:55 AM
So Asteriktos, what religion did that guy establish?

None that I know of... but if he did, I will find out about it!  ;D It's a pic of the poet/writer Paul Laurence Dunbar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Laurence_Dunbar).
He sounds interesting.  :)

He's one of my favorites... I'm glad I stumbled on an old book of his stuff in a used book store years ago. Fwiw I posted some of his poetry here (http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,22932.msg773127.html#msg773127), here (http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,27250.msg429893.html#msg429893), and here (http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,22932.msg364381.html#msg364381).
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 09, 2012, 04:44:55 AM
happenstance

a chance happening, occurrence, or event
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 09, 2012, 07:02:38 PM
convivial

1. friendly; agreeable
2. fond of feasting, drinking, and merry company; jovial.
3. of or befitting a feast; festive

--Source (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/convivial?db=dictionary)--
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 10, 2012, 04:49:47 PM
voluble

characterized by a ready and continuous flow of words; fluent; glib; talkative
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on July 10, 2012, 09:01:36 PM
http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/american_english/hodiernal?region=us

hodiernal Pronunciation: /ˌhōdēˈərnl, ˌhädē-/

Definition of hodiernal
adjective
rare

    of or relating to the present day.

Origin:

mid 17th century: from Latin hodiernus (from hodie 'today') + -al
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on July 10, 2012, 10:10:09 PM
clootie

Mainly Scottish

a name of the devil; a strip or piece of cloth; a rag or item of clothing; a piece of fabric used in the patching of clothes

I only recognize it as a strip of cloth used to make clootie dumpling (a type of spice cake).  I've made it w/ custard sauce many times. 
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 10, 2012, 10:16:11 PM
clootie

Mainly Scottish

a name of the devil; a strip or piece of cloth; a rag or item of clothing; a piece of fabric used in the patching of clothes

I only recognize it as a strip of cloth used to make clootie dumpling (a type of spice cake).  I've made it w/ custard sauce many times. 

Huh :)   I got it from a MST3K episode in which they were using it in the "devil" sense...  Touch of Satan, great episode!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 11, 2012, 07:39:19 PM
loathsome

causing feelings of loathing;  disgusting; revolting; repulsive
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 12, 2012, 02:35:27 AM
pugnacious

inclined to quarrel or fight readily; quarrelsome; belligerent; combative
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 13, 2012, 12:20:56 AM
tendril

a threadlike, leafless organ of climbing plants, often growing in spiral form, which attaches itself to or twines round some other body, so as to support the plant
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Tallitot on July 13, 2012, 03:56:32 AM
friggatriskaidekaphobia

The fear of Friday the 13th
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: orthonorm on July 13, 2012, 09:44:38 AM
friggatriskaidekaphobia

The fear of Friday the 13th


Thanks for the heads up.

Now begins when I count the number of jokes I have to hear about my name. The over / under is 11.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 14, 2012, 05:37:30 AM
Now begins when I count the number of jokes I have to hear about my name. The over / under is 11.

Well, how'd you do?  I missed out on the fun--while I was born on a Friday the 13th, they named me Justin rather than Jason (though a lot of people, including my stepfather's mother, insisted on calling me Jason for some reason).
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 14, 2012, 05:39:17 AM
consanguinity

1) relationship by blood; kinship; 
2) close affinity or connection

--Source (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/consanguine?s=t)--
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 16, 2012, 12:16:23 AM
fulminant

occurring suddenly and with great intensity or severity
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 18, 2012, 11:09:41 PM
hauteur

haughty manner or spirit; arrogance
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 20, 2012, 05:03:42 PM
parallax

the apparent displacement of an observed object due to a change in the position of the observer

the apparent angular displacement of a celestial body due to its being observed from the surface instead of from the center of the earth (diurnal parallax or  geocentric parallax)  or due to its being observed from the earth instead of from the sun (annual parallax or  heliocentric parallax). Compare parallactic ellipse.

the difference between the view of an object as seen through the picture-taking lens of a camera and the view as seen through a separate viewfinder.

an apparent change in the position of cross hairs as viewed through a telescope, when the focusing is imperfect

(Source (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/parallax))
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: orthonorm on July 20, 2012, 05:27:44 PM
parallax

the apparent displacement of an observed object due to a change in the position of the observer

the apparent angular displacement of a celestial body due to its being observed from the surface instead of from the center of the earth (diurnal parallax or  geocentric parallax)  or due to its being observed from the earth instead of from the sun (annual parallax or  heliocentric parallax). Compare parallactic ellipse.

the difference between the view of an object as seen through the picture-taking lens of a camera and the view as seen through a separate viewfinder.

an apparent change in the position of cross hairs as viewed through a telescope, when the focusing is imperfect

(Source (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/parallax))

An interesting idea, since once one is aware of parallax it ceases to be as such, while continuing to function.

Parallax is a wonderful metaphor for many human oddities.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 22, 2012, 09:38:01 PM
^Indeed

anomalistic

of or pertaining to an anomaly
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 23, 2012, 07:12:34 PM
prodigious

1. extraordinary in size, amount, extent, degree, force, etc.
2. wonderful or marvelous
3. abnormal; monstrous

Source (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/prodigious?s=t)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 25, 2012, 11:11:42 PM
asterisk

a small starlike symbol (*), used in writing and printing as a reference mark or to indicate omission, doubtful matter, etc.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 26, 2012, 09:44:12 PM
meliorate

(a variant of ameliorate)

to make or become better, more bearable, or more satisfactory; improve
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Aindriú on July 26, 2012, 10:05:24 PM
asterisk

a small starlike symbol (*), used in writing and printing as a reference mark or to indicate omission, doubtful matter, etc.

LOL
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on August 02, 2012, 01:23:32 AM
asterisk

a small starlike symbol (*), used in writing and printing as a reference mark or to indicate omission, doubtful matter, etc.

LOL

(http://www.polyvore.com/cgi/img-thing?.out=jpg&size=l&tid=26382038)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on August 02, 2012, 01:25:10 AM
panoply

1. a wide-ranging and impressive array or display.

2. a complete suit of armor.

3. a protective covering.

4. full ceremonial attire or paraphernalia; special dress and equipment.

Source (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/panoply?db=dictionary)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on August 16, 2012, 07:17:30 PM
avarice

insatiable greed for riches; inordinate, miserly desire to gain and hoard wealth
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on October 18, 2012, 12:40:25 AM
primogeniture

the state or fact of being the firstborn of children of the same parents

the system of inheritance or succession by the firstborn, specifically the eldest son
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on October 20, 2012, 01:56:54 AM
estimable

worthy of esteem; deserving respect or admiration

capable of being estimated
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Iconodule on October 20, 2012, 10:00:17 AM
Eyne

Plural of "eye" (archaic)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on October 20, 2012, 01:10:54 PM

slumgum


All of the crud (I would use another term for this) that is left over after extracting beeswax.

Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on October 22, 2012, 01:17:06 AM
sprightly

animated, vivacious, or gay; lively
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: primuspilus on October 22, 2012, 10:12:01 AM
sprightly

animated, vivacious, or gay; lively
Justin Beiber is sprightly.

PP
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 11, 2012, 12:42:34 AM
kerfuffle

a commotion or fuss
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Ioannis Climacus on December 11, 2012, 01:02:59 AM
Somnambulism

an abnormal condition of sleep in which motor acts (as walking) are performed.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 11, 2012, 01:08:12 AM
Somnambulism

an abnormal condition of sleep in which motor acts (as walking) are performed.

Also the title of a Tourniquet song  ;D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 28, 2012, 01:24:00 AM
ruffle

Disorder or disarrange
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 28, 2012, 01:26:40 AM
sprightly

animated, vivacious, or gay; lively
Justin Beiber is sprightly.

PP

Wrong kind of gay...  ;D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 29, 2012, 11:48:34 PM
countenance

1) appearance, especially the look or expression of the face
2) approval or favor
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 21, 2013, 07:22:21 PM
spiffing

excellent, splendid
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 23, 2013, 12:56:43 AM
mystical

1) a doctrine of an immediate spiritual intuition of truths believed to transcend ordinary understanding
2) spiritually symbolic
3) obscure in meaning; mysterious
4) not spoken of
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 24, 2013, 03:48:01 AM
voluminous

1) forming, filling, or writing a large volume or many volumes
2) of great volume,  size, or extent
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: orthonorm on January 24, 2013, 03:50:47 AM
voluminous

1) forming, filling, or writing a large volume or many volumes
2) of great volume,  size, or extent


I don't use that word. I use volume-us.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Iconodule on January 24, 2013, 10:01:40 AM
Neck-verse

noun: a verse usu. consisting of the first lines of a Latin version of the 51st psalm formerly set before an accused person claiming benefit of clergy so that the person might vindicate his claim by an intelligent reading aloud of the verse before examiners.

(It's called "neck-verse" because if you couldn't recite the verse, you'd be hanged. I found this fun word while reading Golding's translation of Ovid.)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 02, 2013, 11:07:32 AM
assay

to examine or analyze
to judge the quality of; assess; evaluate
to try or test; put to trial
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: J Michael on February 02, 2013, 05:20:32 PM
Borborygmus

a rumbling or gurgling noise that occurs from the movements of fluid and gas in the intestines


Gotta love that word  ;)!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 09, 2013, 05:56:25 AM
cerebration

the act of thinking; consideration; thought; intellection
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Peacemaker on February 09, 2013, 03:33:05 PM
exacerbate

ex·ac·er·bate
/igˈzasərˌbāt/

Verb
Make (a problem, bad situation, or negative feeling) worse.
Synonyms
aggravate - irritate - exasperate - sharpen
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: orthonorm on February 09, 2013, 05:21:21 PM
cerebration

the act of thinking; consideration; thought; intellection


And you wonder why the Chinese and other Asians are killing us in the maths and sciences? Evely day is a day to cerebrate!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 10, 2013, 07:10:13 AM
florilegia

collections of excerpts from written texts
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 15, 2013, 04:55:39 AM
theologoumenon

a theological statement which is of individual opinion and not doctrine
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on February 18, 2013, 11:23:03 AM
theologoumenon

a theological statement which is of individual opinion and not doctrine


I always have to pause and spell this word in my mind in order to pronounce it.

In the 2005 "How to pronounce Orthodox words" thread we have:
THE-o-LO-goo-men-on (TH like wiTH, not THat.)
they-oh-loh-goo-MEH-non (with a hard "th)
the-o-lo-GOO-me-non

Since no one is going to understand what I am saying any way, I mostly say Theo (as in the name of Vincent's brother) - Low (as pertaining to my how I feel a lot of the time) - goo (as in goo goo gaga or anything gooey) - meh (people use this term here but I do not know what it means) - non (like in non-starter)

On a side note, I was surprised by the outcome of a googlefight between Arius and Apollinarius (199,000 vs 4060, respectively). Maybe I spelled Apollinarius' name incorrectly. I was rooting for him all the way but luckily didn't put money down on him.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 20, 2013, 07:09:33 AM
What about Calvin vs. Luther?  I'd say Calvin vs. Arminius, but that one's obvious... ;D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 20, 2013, 07:10:32 AM
infralapsarianism

the theological doctrine that man’s fall was foreseen and permitted by God, who then decreed election as a method for the salvation of some of mankind
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on February 22, 2013, 12:58:28 PM
What about Calvin vs. Luther?  I'd say Calvin vs. Arminius, but that one's obvious... ;D


That would be Calvin Klein and Calvin and Hobbes vs Martin Luther King and some TV show.

The result for "John Calvin" versus ["Martin Luther" -King] is 232,000 and 1,060,000, respectively.  "Martin Luther King" totally dominates at 22,000,000.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: orthonorm on February 22, 2013, 01:14:30 PM
What about Calvin vs. Luther?  I'd say Calvin vs. Arminius, but that one's obvious... ;D


That would be Calvin Klein and Calvin and Hobbes vs Martin Luther King and some TV show.

The result for "John Calvin" versus ["Martin Luther" -King] is 232,000 and 1,060,000, respectively.  "Martin Luther King" totally dominates at 22,000,000.

"Martin Luther" -"Martin Luther King" returns about 27.6 million hits.

Just removing king would remove a lot of references to Martin Luther as well.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on February 23, 2013, 02:10:27 PM
What about Calvin vs. Luther?  I'd say Calvin vs. Arminius, but that one's obvious... ;D


That would be Calvin Klein and Calvin and Hobbes vs Martin Luther King and some TV show.

The result for "John Calvin" versus ["Martin Luther" -King] is 232,000 and 1,060,000, respectively.  "Martin Luther King" totally dominates at 22,000,000.

"Martin Luther" -"Martin Luther King" returns about 27.6 million hits.

Just removing king would remove a lot of references to Martin Luther as well.


I did consider the likely effect of the -King, but I also thought that a lot of people like myself would not know Calvin's first name and just use Calvin.

I am now perplexed, however. The google fight between "martin luther" and "martin luther king" returned 4.26M for "martin luther" and 22M for "martin luther king" even though there is a "martin luther" within every "martin luther king".

Google web search gave 91.3M hits for "martin luther" and 115M hits for "martin luther king" even though there is a "martin luther" within every  "martin luther king". Confirming the algorithm, "martin luther king" -"martin luther" produced zero results.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 28, 2013, 04:36:16 PM
exempla

examples or models; anecdotes that illustrate or support a moral point
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: orthonorm on February 28, 2013, 05:13:58 PM
What about Calvin vs. Luther?  I'd say Calvin vs. Arminius, but that one's obvious... ;D


That would be Calvin Klein and Calvin and Hobbes vs Martin Luther King and some TV show.

The result for "John Calvin" versus ["Martin Luther" -King] is 232,000 and 1,060,000, respectively.  "Martin Luther King" totally dominates at 22,000,000.

"Martin Luther" -"Martin Luther King" returns about 27.6 million hits.

Just removing king would remove a lot of references to Martin Luther as well.


I did consider the likely effect of the -King, but I also thought that a lot of people like myself would not know Calvin's first name and just use Calvin.

I am now perplexed, however. The google fight between "martin luther" and "martin luther king" returned 4.26M for "martin luther" and 22M for "martin luther king" even though there is a "martin luther" within every "martin luther king".

Google web search gave 91.3M hits for "martin luther" and 115M hits for "martin luther king" even though there is a "martin luther" within every  "martin luther king". Confirming the algorithm, "martin luther king" -"martin luther" produced zero results.

Google tries to do a little thinking for you as you can see in difference between your example and mine. It is not using strict Boolean logic (at least not at the level of the user generated search).
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 18, 2013, 03:58:23 PM
plagiarize

to take a good idea from an old thread and start a new thread using the same idea

 :-* :P ;D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: LizaSymonenko on July 18, 2013, 04:13:43 PM

Kayu!!!!!!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 18, 2013, 06:29:07 PM

Kayu!!!!!!

(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/252/7152977.jpg)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Ansgar on July 18, 2013, 06:38:57 PM

Kayu!!!!!!

(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/252/7152977.jpg)

Explanation?
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 18, 2013, 06:40:14 PM

Kayu!!!!!!

(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/252/7152977.jpg)

Explanation?

[video (http://youtu.be/wXrfoJmsGTg)]
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Ansgar on July 18, 2013, 06:44:27 PM

Kayu!!!!!!

(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/252/7152977.jpg)

Explanation?

[video (http://youtu.be/wXrfoJmsGTg)]

Oh... okay.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 18, 2013, 06:46:42 PM
Oh... okay.

I guess you were more of a Dora guy...
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Ansgar on July 18, 2013, 07:03:24 PM
Oh... okay.

I guess you were more of a Dora guy...

Not really. I am a child of the 90´s. Maybe my brother watched it.

I do remember watching the Bussy World of Richard Scarry on a few occasions.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 18, 2013, 07:06:00 PM
Not really. I am a child of the 90´s. Maybe my brother watched it.

Perhaps David the Gnome then? Or Gummi Bears. Hmm...
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Ansgar on July 18, 2013, 07:11:59 PM
Not really. I am a child of the 90´s. Maybe my brother watched it.

Perhaps David the Gnome then? Or Gummi Bears. Hmm...

No, sorry.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 18, 2013, 07:16:49 PM
Not really. I am a child of the 90´s. Maybe my brother watched it.

Perhaps David the Gnome then? Or Gummi Bears. Hmm...

No, sorry.

Beavis and Butthead? Ren and Stimpy?

Well anyway, good luck in your future endeavors!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Ansgar on July 18, 2013, 07:20:32 PM
Not really. I am a child of the 90´s. Maybe my brother watched it.

Perhaps David the Gnome then? Or Gummi Bears. Hmm...

No, sorry.

Beavis and Butthead? Ren and Stimpy?

Well anyway, good luck in your future endeavors!

Thank you.  :)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: celticfan1888 on July 21, 2013, 07:33:50 PM
早晨 (jóusàhn) - Good Morning
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 22, 2013, 04:40:55 AM
magniloquent

speaking or expressed in a lofty or grandiose style; pompous; bombastic; boastful
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 22, 2013, 04:43:00 AM
早晨 (jóusàhn) - Good Morning

Hanna Minx (http://www.youtube.com/user/MissHannahMinx/videos) is a good teacher. I have a feeling it's a different language--but no matter, the language stuff is secondary. It's about... having a comfortable relationship with your instructor, ya know?
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 23, 2013, 12:58:30 PM
adequacivity

the condition or quality of being adequate
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: WPM on July 23, 2013, 01:01:24 PM
Equinamous
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: genesisone on July 23, 2013, 01:37:08 PM
ekistics

The science of human settlements, including city or community planning and design. source of definition (http://www.wordnik.com/words/ekistics)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: TheTrisagion on July 23, 2013, 01:48:23 PM
adequacivity

the condition or quality of being adequate
I shall have to figure out how to work this into my every day conversation.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 24, 2013, 08:17:37 PM
orthostat

an upright stone or slab

(http://spacesofmnajdra.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Middleinner.png)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 26, 2013, 02:31:57 AM
coruscate

to emit vivid flashes of light; sparkle; scintillate; gleam.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on July 26, 2013, 10:17:31 AM
coruscate

to emit vivid flashes of light; sparkle; scintillate; gleam.

Curious, I went to count a bunch of radioactive samples two days ago that were coruscating like the dickens but I found that my scintillation counter was dead. I had to go to another building across campus.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Luke on July 30, 2013, 11:57:10 PM
SUBSPACE     A space each of whose points is contained in a given space but which does not itself contain all the points of the given space.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Peacemaker on August 03, 2013, 01:12:26 AM
Accubation - The practice of eating or drinking while lying down

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQjMOAv_DteGUwU3_tMF8bsInkh0r_rlWlcjRijIV-njZX6gKiP)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on August 11, 2013, 07:42:19 AM
vasty

an archaic or poetic word for vast
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on September 12, 2013, 10:53:29 PM
delusive

tending to delude; misleading; deceptive: "a delusive reply

of the nature of a delusion; false; unreal: "a delusive belief"
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on November 12, 2013, 11:58:08 PM
horsefeathers

rubbish; nonsense; bunk
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on November 18, 2013, 02:49:43 PM
benignity

kindness, gentleness, or tolerance toward others
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: orthonorm on November 18, 2013, 03:30:27 PM
coruscate

to emit vivid flashes of light; sparkle; scintillate; gleam.

Curious, I went to count a bunch of radioactive samples two days ago that were coruscating like the dickens but I found that my scintillation counter was dead. I had to go to another building across campus.

How huggable are you?
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on November 19, 2013, 01:03:34 AM
desiderate

to feel the lack of or need for; long for; miss
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on November 19, 2013, 01:23:55 AM
coruscate

to emit vivid flashes of light; sparkle; scintillate; gleam.

Curious, I went to count a bunch of radioactive samples two days ago that were coruscating like the dickens but I found that my scintillation counter was dead. I had to go to another building across campus.

How huggable are you?

I live for it Orthonorm. I always find some of your insights about myself uncanny, this being one of them.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: J Michael on November 20, 2013, 10:12:34 AM
cacophemism*

A word or expression that is generally perceived as harsh, impolite, or offensive. Similar to dysphemism. Contrast with euphemism.


*Thanks, Isa!!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on November 21, 2013, 02:19:01 AM
obdurate

- unmoved by persuasion, pity, or tender feelings; stubborn; unyielding.
- stubbornly resistant to moral influence; persistently impenitent
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on November 23, 2013, 02:02:20 AM
quiescence

dormancy; a state of quiet (but possibly temporary) inaction
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on November 23, 2013, 02:39:46 AM
perspicacity

-acuteness of perception, discernment, or understanding.
-intelligence manifested by being astute (as in business dealings)
-the capacity to assess situations or circumstances shrewdly and to draw sound conclusions
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on November 23, 2013, 10:26:36 PM
indicia

signs, indications, or distinguishing marks
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on November 25, 2013, 05:03:10 AM
solipsism

n. Philosophy
-The theory that the self is the only thing that can be known and verified.
-The theory or view that the self is the only reality.
-the extreme form of scepticism which denies the possibility of any knowledge other than of one's own existence
-the theory that only the self exists, or can be proved to exist.
-self-absorption.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on November 25, 2013, 10:31:01 AM
Balderdash. That's not an extreme form of skepticism, it's a half-hearted form (though admittedly it's infinitely better than the hack efforts of Descartes). A real extreme skeptic would be in doubt even of their own existence.  8)  ;D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Hawkeye on November 25, 2013, 10:35:28 AM
What if our thoughts are being thought by the real solipsist out there? How could we prove otherwise? ;)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on December 09, 2013, 10:59:50 AM
Well, this is really a term.

Scalability

"In electronics (including hardware, communication and software), scalability is the ability of a system, network, or process to handle a growing amount of work in a capable manner or its ability to be enlarged to accommodate that growth.[1] For example, it can refer to the capability of a system to increase total throughput under an increased load when resources (typically hardware) are added. An analogous meaning is implied when the word is used in an economic context, where scalability of a company implies that the underlying business model offers the potential for economic growth within the company.

Scalability, as a property of systems, is generally difficult to define[2] and in any particular case it is necessary to define the specific requirements for scalability on those dimensions that are deemed important. It is a highly significant issue in electronics systems, databases, routers, and networking. A system whose performance improves after adding hardware, proportionally to the capacity added, is said to be a scalable system."

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalability

Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on December 10, 2013, 03:37:26 AM
Another fun term:

Pre-order


"A pre-order is an order placed for an item which has not yet been released. The idea for pre-orders came when people found it hard to get popular items in stores due to their popularity. Companies were then given the idea to allow people to reserve their own personal copy, before the release, which has been a huge success. Pre-orders allow consumers to guarantee immediate shipment on release, manufacturers can gauge how much demand there will be and hence how large initial production runs should be, and sellers can be assured of minimum sales. Additionally, high pre-order rates can be used to further increase sales."

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-order
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on December 11, 2013, 06:15:02 AM
in·sip·id

1.without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2.without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Iconodule on December 11, 2013, 06:59:39 AM
in·sip·id

1.without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2.without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup.

Excellent description of Osho's "spirituality."
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on December 11, 2013, 07:01:48 AM
in·sip·id

1.without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2.without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup.

Excellent description of Osho's "spirituality."

Another Osho hater. To the contrary, most of those who proudly consider themselves Orthodox are actually devoid of any spirituality. In other words, insipid, boring, even emotionally unstable and abusive, especially towards those who aren't as "good" as them.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 11, 2013, 07:13:09 AM
gladden

to make or become glad or joyful
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on December 11, 2013, 07:14:59 AM
gladden

to make or become glad or joyful

Hell, no! That's stuff Osho would say.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Iconodule on December 11, 2013, 08:18:57 AM
in·sip·id

1.without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2.without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup.

Excellent description of Osho's "spirituality."

Another Osho hater. To the contrary, most of those who proudly consider themselves Orthodox are actually devoid of any spirituality. In other words, insipid, boring, even emotionally unstable and abusive, especially towards those who aren't as "good" as them.

Here's another quote from him to stick in your signature: "if a child is born deaf, dumb, and we cannot do anything, and the parents are willing, the child should be put to eternal sleep."
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on December 11, 2013, 08:24:42 AM
in·sip·id

1.without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2.without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup.

Excellent description of Osho's "spirituality."

Another Osho hater. To the contrary, most of those who proudly consider themselves Orthodox are actually devoid of any spirituality. In other words, insipid, boring, even emotionally unstable and abusive, especially towards those who aren't as "good" as them.

Here's another quote from him to stick in your signature: "if a child is born deaf, dumb, and we cannot do anything, and the parents are willing, the child should be put to eternal sleep."

Have you heard some of the stuff the saints did or said during their lives? Put hate aside and you'll become wise.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Iconodule on December 11, 2013, 08:28:18 AM
in·sip·id

1.without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2.without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup.

Excellent description of Osho's "spirituality."

Another Osho hater. To the contrary, most of those who proudly consider themselves Orthodox are actually devoid of any spirituality. In other words, insipid, boring, even emotionally unstable and abusive, especially towards those who aren't as "good" as them.

Here's another quote from him to stick in your signature: "if a child is born deaf, dumb, and we cannot do anything, and the parents are willing, the child should be put to eternal sleep."

Have you heard some of the stuff the saints did or said during their lives? Put hate aside and you'll become wise.

It sounds like you're already wise enough for two people.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on December 11, 2013, 08:29:50 AM
in·sip·id

1.without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2.without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup.

Excellent description of Osho's "spirituality."

Another Osho hater. To the contrary, most of those who proudly consider themselves Orthodox are actually devoid of any spirituality. In other words, insipid, boring, even emotionally unstable and abusive, especially towards those who aren't as "good" as them.

Here's another quote from him to stick in your signature: "if a child is born deaf, dumb, and we cannot do anything, and the parents are willing, the child should be put to eternal sleep."

Have you heard some of the stuff the saints did or said during their lives? Put hate aside and you'll become wise.

It sounds like you're already wise enough for two people.

That's your perception. I am sure there are tons of people laughing their heads of off, they just don't bother to post anything.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Iconodule on December 11, 2013, 08:31:44 AM
in·sip·id

1.without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2.without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup.

Excellent description of Osho's "spirituality."

Another Osho hater. To the contrary, most of those who proudly consider themselves Orthodox are actually devoid of any spirituality. In other words, insipid, boring, even emotionally unstable and abusive, especially towards those who aren't as "good" as them.

Here's another quote from him to stick in your signature: "if a child is born deaf, dumb, and we cannot do anything, and the parents are willing, the child should be put to eternal sleep."

Have you heard some of the stuff the saints did or said during their lives? Put hate aside and you'll become wise.

It sounds like you're already wise enough for two people.

That's your perception. I am sure there are tons of people laughing their heads of off, they just don't bother to post anything.

The light of wisdom emanating from a single post of yours illuminates numberless worlds and liberates countless sentient beings.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on December 11, 2013, 08:32:58 AM
in·sip·id

1.without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2.without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup.

Excellent description of Osho's "spirituality."

Another Osho hater. To the contrary, most of those who proudly consider themselves Orthodox are actually devoid of any spirituality. In other words, insipid, boring, even emotionally unstable and abusive, especially towards those who aren't as "good" as them.

Here's another quote from him to stick in your signature: "if a child is born deaf, dumb, and we cannot do anything, and the parents are willing, the child should be put to eternal sleep."

Have you heard some of the stuff the saints did or said during their lives? Put hate aside and you'll become wise.

It sounds like you're already wise enough for two people.

That's your perception. I am sure there are tons of people laughing their heads of off, they just don't bother to post anything.

The light of wisdom emanating from a single post of yours illuminates numberless worlds and liberates countless sentient beings.

Thank you! In all honesty, I believe you are right.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on December 14, 2013, 10:45:24 AM
al·le·go·ry 

a. The representation of abstract ideas or principles by characters, figures, or events in narrative, dramatic, or pictorial form.
b. A story, picture, or play employing such representation. John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and Herman Melville's Moby Dick are allegories.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 14, 2013, 12:46:48 PM
casuistry

specious, deceptive, or oversubtle reasoning, especially in questions of morality; fallacious or dishonest application of general principles; sophistry
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on December 14, 2013, 12:53:20 PM
casuistry

specious, deceptive, or oversubtle reasoning, especially in questions of morality; fallacious or dishonest application of general principles; sophistry

This is not a virtue?!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Jetavan on December 27, 2013, 10:12:40 AM
Pithecoid: 1. (adjective) Resembling or relating to the apes, especially the higher apes; apelike. 2. (noun) An ape, especially a higher ape.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on January 03, 2014, 12:02:28 PM

so·ber


1.not intoxicated or drunk.
2.habitually temperate, especially in the use of liquor.
3.quiet or sedate in demeanor, as persons.
4.marked by seriousness, gravity, solemnity, etc., as of demeanor, speech, etc.: a sober occasion. (I particularly think this is an important, but forgotten aspect of sobriety).
5.subdued in tone, as color; not gay or showy, as clothes.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 03, 2014, 08:06:29 PM
insensate

lacking sensation or awareness; lacking sensibility; unfeeling
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 05, 2014, 03:03:13 PM
facility

something that permits the easier performance of an action, course of conduct, etc.; readiness or ease due to skill, aptitude, or practice; ready compliance; an easy-flowing manner; the quality of being easily or conveniently done or performed; Goldeneye level
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 08, 2014, 09:49:36 PM
djamming

[definition unknown]
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 10, 2014, 04:35:02 AM
animadversion

an unfavorable or censorious comment; the act of criticizing
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Santagranddad on January 10, 2014, 06:37:21 AM
POGONOPHOBIA:

Fear of beards, a phobia endemic among liberal 'Orthodox'.  ;D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: xOrthodox4Christx on January 10, 2014, 06:59:10 AM
POGONOPHOBIA:

Fear of beards, a phobia endemic among liberal 'Orthodox'.  ;D

lol Not just Orthodox have that fear.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Santagranddad on January 10, 2014, 08:20:58 AM
POGONOPHOBIA:

Fear of beards, a phobia endemic among liberal 'Orthodox'.  ;D

lol Not just Orthodox have that fear.

True, the BBC, political parties among others.  ::)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on January 10, 2014, 08:46:30 AM
Allegator - Someone who alleges.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Jetavan on January 10, 2014, 09:39:42 AM
pistic: from ancient Greek πίστις faith
(adj.) Relating to faith or trust rather than reason
(noun) A person whose belief is based on faith
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on January 11, 2014, 10:44:54 AM
pri·mate 

1. (prmt) A mammal of the order Primates, which includes the anthropoids and prosimians, characterized by refined development of the hands and feet, a shortened snout, and a large brain.
2. A bishop of highest rank in a province or country.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: hecma925 on January 13, 2014, 09:16:23 AM
Roucoulement, n.
Pronunciation:  Brit. /ˈruːkuːlmɒ̃/ , U.S. /ˈruˌkulmən(t)/ Etymology:  < French roucoulement(1611 in Cotgrave) < roucouler + -ment
A soft cooing or murmuring noise, spec. the characteristic sound made by a dove or pigeon


Professor Pigeon
http://youtu.be/cN1EiJr0lDE
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 22, 2014, 05:41:42 PM
flummox

perplex greatly; bewilder
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on January 22, 2014, 05:50:43 PM
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/eupeptic

eupeptic
Line breaks: eu|pep¦tic
Pronunciation: /juːˈpɛptɪk
 
/
adjective

    relating to or having good digestion or a consequent air of healthy good spirits.
    More example sentences

Origin

late 17th century (in the sense 'helping digestion'): from Greek eupeptos, from eu 'well, easily' + peptein 'to digest'.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 27, 2014, 11:16:14 PM
incense

to cause to be extremely angry; infuriate
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 27, 2014, 11:16:24 PM
incense

an aromatic substance, such as wood or a gum, that is burned to produce a pleasant odor; a pleasant smell
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on January 29, 2014, 06:45:10 AM

mo·ron
[mawr-on, mohr-] Show IPA
noun
1. Informal. a person who is notably stupid or lacking in good judgment: I wonder why they elected that narrow-minded moron to Congress.
2. Psychology . (no longer in technical use; now considered offensive) a person of borderline intelligence in a former and discarded classification of mental retardation, having an intelligence quotient of 50 to 69.

3. (Ioan's addition to the dictionary) A word that saves souls.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 06, 2014, 10:37:03 PM
charlatanry

fraudulent or deceptive claims regarding skills or knowledge; quackery
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Luke on February 06, 2014, 11:38:51 PM
snow/snō/
noun
noun: snow1. atmospheric water vapor frozen into ice crystals and falling in light white flakes or lying on the ground as a white layer.
"we were trudging through deep snow"
2. something that resembles snow in color or texture, in particular.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 10, 2014, 11:27:53 AM
muckety-muck

a person of great importance or self-importance
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 10, 2014, 11:29:19 AM
dord

Dord is a notable error in lexicography, an accidental creation, or ghost word, of the G. and C. Merriam Company's staff included in the second (1934) edition of its New International Dictionary, in which the term is defined as "density"...

(Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dord))
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on February 10, 2014, 04:01:19 PM
mondegreen
Line breaks: mon|de|green
Pronunciation: /ˈmɒndəgriːn
 
/
noun

    a misunderstood or misinterpreted word or phrase resulting from a mishearing of the lyrics of a song.
    More example sentences

Origin

1950s: from Lady Mondegreen, a misinterpretation of the phrase laid him on the green, from the traditional ballad ‘The Bonny Earl of Murray’.

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/mondegreen
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 16, 2014, 10:05:39 PM
gird

to encircle or bind with a belt or band; to surround; enclose; hem in; to prepare (oneself) for action
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on March 06, 2014, 04:32:07 AM
ingress

the act of going in or entering; the right to enter; a means or place of entering
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on March 16, 2014, 07:32:06 PM
pish posh

nonsense
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on March 16, 2014, 10:23:59 PM
pish posh

nonsense

Psst, just between you and me, not all P words have vowels. And don't say Pshaw, I know you want to right now. Ease into this, be mellow, be calm, be SoCal like you were born to be, don't reject your destiny. Anakin was your father for God's sake.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on March 22, 2014, 10:06:22 PM
dependless

not depending on


(Probably not a real word. Though since it's being used I guess it is a real word.)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on March 22, 2014, 10:41:42 PM
dependless

not depending on


(Probably not a real word. Though since it's being used I guess it is a real word.)

This reminds me. A few weeks ago I was going to offer:

Protoprognosticators

Mothers

Source: Ersatzian University Press, "Useful English Terms and Phrases".

I am guessing that Ersatzian University is in Armenia or thereabouts.

I wrote up a bunch of examples of its usage, but I seem to have lost it in the meantime. Darn!




Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on March 24, 2014, 03:07:32 PM
Well if you find them by all means post them!  8)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on April 07, 2014, 08:22:00 PM
frigidity
 
the state or condition of being frigid
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on April 25, 2014, 12:14:13 PM
lu·cid·i·ty

noun
1.the quality of being easily understood, completely intelligible, or comprehensible: She makes her argument with pointed logic and exemplary lucidity.
2.the ability to see things clearly; rationality; sanity: In a rare moment of lucidity, the senator sided with his political enemies for the good of the country.

adj
lucid
1. readily understood; clear
2. shining or glowing (love this one)
3. psychiatry  of or relating to a period of normality between periods of insane or irresponsible behaviour

Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on April 25, 2014, 02:40:31 PM
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/gussy

Definition of gussy in English:
gussy
Line breaks: gussy
Pronunciation: /ˈgʌsi
 
/
verb (gussies, gussying, gussied)
[with object] (gussy someone/thing up) North American • informal

    Make someone or something more attractive, especially in a showy or gimmicky way: shopkeepers gussied up their window displays
    More example sentences

Origin

1940s: perhaps from Gussie, pet form of the given name Augustus.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on May 05, 2014, 02:48:39 PM
promenade

a stroll or walk, especially in a public place, as for pleasure or display; an area used for such walking
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on May 06, 2014, 11:30:16 PM
Exute

(transitive verb) - to strip [a person] of; to divest or deprive of

I was going to post this, but I see I already beat myself to it. Still a fine word to bump for your learned edification.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on May 15, 2014, 10:36:05 PM
"And the waters covered their enemies: there was not one of them left. Then believed they his words; they sang his praise. They soon forgat his works; they waited not for his counsel: But lusted exceedingly in the wilderness, and tempted God in the desert." - Ps. 106:11-14

forgat

verb; archaic
a simple past tense of forget

Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on May 15, 2014, 11:59:27 PM
Exute

(transitive verb) - to strip [a person] of; to divest or deprive of

I was going to post this, but I see I already beat myself to it. Still a fine word to bump for your learned edification.

Despite the claim. I do not think Exute is a word in the English language. It has a very useful, precise definition. Google Scholar cites 297 instances of use. Most in the English language are typos for Execute. Most of the remainder are in Latin or French. The few English language articles are about archaic terms that are no longer in use.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: TheTrisagion on May 16, 2014, 12:06:44 AM
Then I guess I will exute Asteriktos of his title as Grand Master Wordsmith.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on May 16, 2014, 12:07:27 AM
Huh, interesting. :) Perhaps borrowed from the Latin and retaining something of that? Not sure, but for what it's worth it is listed in some online dictionaries; for example...

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exute

But regarding it being archaic, I read the KJV, so I come across such things every day  ;)  Having said that, the first time I heard the term was on a 90s tv sitcom, so it can't be completely unused.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on May 16, 2014, 12:12:18 AM
My link seems to request a sign up for some reason, yet when I Google the word I can access the info. Here is what Merriam Webster had as the entry:

Quote
ex·ute transitive verb \igˈzüt\
 
Full Definition of EXUTE

archaic
:  strip <exuted of all his preferments — Robert Southey>
Origin of EXUTE

Latin exutus, past participle of exuere
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on May 16, 2014, 01:05:15 AM
Huh, interesting. :) Perhaps borrowed from the Latin and retaining something of that? Not sure, but for what it's worth it is listed in some online dictionaries; for example...

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exute

But regarding it being archaic, I read the KJV, so I come across such things every day  ;)  Having said that, the first time I heard the term was on a 90s tv sitcom, so it can't be completely unused.

This is precisely the problem. I dated a Miriam once and I am sure Merriam is no better. What went on I will not divulge, but I recommend keeping away from this dictionary.

And yes, I am going to plug the Ersatzian University Press dictionary because it is probably vetted by the Armenian Apostolic Church and therefore safe from (left blank in order to not get into a debate). Forewarned is Forearmed. Whatever that means.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: DeniseDenise on May 16, 2014, 01:18:07 AM
bed·lam  [bed-luhm] 
noun
1.
a scene or state of wild uproar and confusion.
2.
Archaic. an insane asylum or madhouse.
Origin:
 a popular name for the Hospital of St. Mary of Bethlehem in London, which served as a lunatic asylum from circa 1400; compare Middle English Bedleem, Bethleem, Old English Betleem Bethlehem

Synonyms
1. disorder, tumult, chaos, clamor, turmoil, commotion, pandemonium.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on May 16, 2014, 02:20:17 PM
luck

noun
1.
the force that seems to operate for good or ill in a person's life, as in shaping circumstances, events, or opportunities: With my luck I'll probably get pneumonia.
2.
good fortune; advantage or success, considered as the result of chance: He had no luck finding work.
3.
a combination of circumstances, events, etc., operating by chance to bring good or ill to a person: She's had nothing but bad luck all year.
4.
some object on which good fortune is supposed to depend: This rabbit's foot is my luck.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on May 22, 2014, 01:34:49 AM
adamantine

- utterly unyielding or firm in attitude or opinion
- too hard to cut, break, or pierce.
- like a diamond in luster
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on May 25, 2014, 05:17:58 PM
Learnt a new word from the joint statement of Pope Francis and Pat. Bartholomew  8)

emarginate

notched at the margin; having a notched tip or edge
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Mor Ephrem on July 27, 2014, 07:08:45 PM
dis·si·pa·tion
ˌdisəˈpāSHən
noun
noun: dissipation; plural noun: dissipations

1.  dissipated living.
"a descent into drunkenness and sexual dissipation"
synonyms:   debauchery, decadence, dissoluteness, dissolution, intemperance, excess, overconsumption, profligacy, self-indulgence, wildness;
antonyms:   asceticism

2.  squandering of money, energy, or resources.
"the dissipation of the country's mineral wealth"
synonyms:   squandering, frittering (away), waste, misspending;
antonyms:   preservation, accumulation

PHYSICS
loss of energy, especially by its conversion into heat.

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense ‘complete disintegration’): from Latin dissipatio(n-), from the verb dissipare (see dissipate).
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on July 27, 2014, 07:18:49 PM
Premonition

A strong feeling that something is about to happen, especially something unpleasant.

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/premonition
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Arachne on July 27, 2014, 07:21:44 PM
Parisyllabic

(Linguistics) (of a noun or verb, in inflected languages) containing the same number of syllables in all or almost all inflected forms.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/parisyllabic
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Maria on August 04, 2014, 05:10:58 PM
bloviation - contributed by PtA
   
blo·vi·ate 
intr.v. blo·vi·at·ed, blo·vi·at·ing, blo·vi·ates Slang

To discourse at length in a pompous or boastful manner: "the rural Babbitt who bloviates about 'progress' and 'growth'" (George Rebeck).

[Mock-Latinate formation, from blow.]
blovi·ation n.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/bloviation
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on August 05, 2014, 11:20:40 AM
Porpentine

A rodent harboring hollow spines.

Usage:

I am thy father's spirit,
Doom'd for a certain term to walk the night,
And for the day confined to fast in fires,
Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature
Are burnt and purged away. But that I am forbid
To tell the secrets of my prison-house,
I could a tale unfold whose lightest word
Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood,
Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres,
Thy knotted and combined locks to part
And each particular hair to stand on end,
Like quills upon the fretful porpentine:
But this eternal blazon must not be
To ears of flesh and blood. List, list, O, list!
If thou didst ever thy dear father love--

Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Porter ODoran on August 05, 2014, 09:26:27 PM
Exute

(transitive verb) - to strip [a person] of; to divest or deprive of

I was going to post this, but I see I already beat myself to it. Still a fine word to bump for your learned edification.

Despite the claim. I do not think Exute is a word in the English language. It has a very useful, precise definition. Google Scholar cites 297 instances of use. Most in the English language are typos for Execute. Most of the remainder are in Latin or French. The few English language articles are about archaic terms that are no longer in use.

So what you're saying is that it's an archaic, Latinate, or specialist word in the English language? ;)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: orthonorm on August 05, 2014, 09:41:50 PM
Exute

(transitive verb) - to strip [a person] of; to divest or deprive of

I was going to post this, but I see I already beat myself to it. Still a fine word to bump for your learned edification.

Despite the claim. I do not think Exute is a word in the English language. It has a very useful, precise definition. Google Scholar cites 297 instances of use. Most in the English language are typos for Execute. Most of the remainder are in Latin or French. The few English language articles are about archaic terms that are no longer in use.

So what you're saying is that it's an archaic, Latinate, or specialist word in the English language? ;)

You paraphrasing Opus has got to be a ban-able offense. Letting the mods know now.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on August 08, 2014, 05:31:38 AM
pendulate - to swing as a pendulum
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Fabio Leite on August 08, 2014, 09:51:50 AM
English words that possibly come from Portuguese, directly or indirectly.

Quote
Albatross
an alteration of albatroz, under influence of the Latin word albus ("white")

Albino
from albino, with the same meaning, from Latin albus


Banana
from Portuguese or Spanish (more probably from Portuguese, as the most widespread Spanish word is plátano); from Portuguese, of African origin; akin to Wolof banäna banana

Baroque
from barroco (adj. = "unshapely")

Breeze
probably from Old Spanish and Portuguese briza 'northeastern wind

Buffalo
from Portuguese bufalo, from late Latin bufalus, from Greek boubalos 'antelope, wild ox'

Cachalot
from Portuguese cachalote (same meaning), probably via Spanish or French. The Portuguese word comes from cachola ("head" or "big head")

Caramel
from French, Spanish or Portuguese caramelo, 'caramel', from Late Latin calamellus

Caravel
from caravela

Cashew
from caju

Caste
from casta (="class")

Cobra
shortening of cobra-de-capelo, with the same meaning (literally, "snake with a hood")

Coconut
from coco + nut

Commando
from comando 'command'

Creole
French créole, from Castilian Spanish criollo, person native to a locality, from Portuguese crioulo, diminutive of cria, ("'person raised in one's house with no blood relation, a servant'"), < Portuguese criar ("'to rear, to raise, to bring up'"), from Latin creare, to beget; < Latin creo ("'to create'"), which came into English via French between 1595 and 1605. [same root as creature]

Dodo
According to Encarta Dictionary and Chambers Dictionary of Etymology, "dodo" comes from Portuguese doudo (currently, more often, doido) meaning "fool" or "crazy". The present Portuguese word dodô ("dodo") is of English origin. The Portuguese word doudo or doido may itself be a loanword from Old English (cp. English "dolt")

Embarrass
from Portuguese embaraçar (same meaning; also to tangle - string or rope), from em + baraço (archaic for "rope")

Emu
from ema (="rhea")

Fetish
from French fétiche, from Portuguese feitiço ("charm", "sorcery", "spell"), from Latin factitius or feticius ("artificial")

Flamingo
from Portuguese flamingo, from Spanish flamenco


Jackfruit
from Portuguese jaca, from Malayalam chakka + fruit

Jaguar
from Tupi or Guaraní jaguarete via Portuguese

Junk
from junco, from Javanese djong (Malay adjong).

Konpeitō
Japanese sweets, from the Portuguese confeito (sugar candy)

Labrador
from name of Portuguese explorer João Fernandes Lavrador, the surname meaning "landowner" or "farmer"

Lacquer
from French lacre, from Portuguese lacre, from Arabic lakk, from Persian lak

Lambada
from lambada (="beating, lashing")

Macaw
from macau; ultimately from Tupi macavuana.

Mandarin
from mandarim, from the Malay mantri, from Hindi मंत्री matri, from Sanskrit मन्त्रिन् mantrin (="counsellor")

Mango
from manga, via Malay mangga, ultimately from Malayalam മാങ്ങ māṅṅa or from Tamil மாங்காய் mānkāy

Mangrove
probably from Portuguese mangue mangrove (from Spanish mangle, probably from Taino) + English grove

Manioc
from mandioca (="cassava") from Tupi mandioca.

Marmalade
from marmelada, a preserve made from marmelo (="quince")

Molasses
from melaço (="treacle")

Monsoon
from monção

Mosquito
from Mosquito meaning 'little fly'

Mulatto
Portuguese mulato. From mula (=mule) a cross between a horse and a donkey or from the Arabic term muwallad, which means "a person of mixed ancestry"

Negro
Negro means "black" in Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian, being from the Latin word niger (Dative nigro, Accusative nigrum) and the Greek word Νέγρος Negros both of the same meaning. It came to English through the Portuguese and Spanish slave trade. Prior to the 1970s, it was the dominant term for Black people of African origin; in most English language contexts (except its inclusion in the names of some organizations founded when the term had currency, e.g. the United Negro College Fund), it is now considered either archaic or a slur in most contexts.

Pagoda
from pagode; corruption of Persian بوتکاتا butkata (+"idol deity")

Piranha
from piranha (=piranha), from Tupi pirá ("fish") + ánha ("cut")

potato
from "batata"

Samba
from samba ; ultimately of Angolan origin, semba

Sargasso
from sargaço (="sargasso")

Savvy
from "sabe" (he knows), from "saber" (to know)

Stevedore
from estivador (="stevedore")

Talapoin
from French, from Portuguese talapão

Tank
from tanque

Tapioca
from tapioca

Tempura
Japanese 天麩羅, tenpura?, also written as "天ぷら", from Portuguese têmporas, (=Ember Days)

Verandah
from varanda (="balcony" or "railing"), from Hindi वरांडा varanda or Bengali baranda

Yam
from inhame or Spanish ñame from West African nyama (="eat")

Zebra
from zebra (same meaning), which started as the feminine form of zebro (a kind of deer), from vulgar Latin eciferus, classical Latin EQUIFERVS.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on September 21, 2014, 09:39:55 PM
Parkinson's Law

"Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion" (Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkinson%27s_law))
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 05, 2014, 10:41:05 PM
trypophobia

fear of objects with clusters of, or an irregular pattern of, holes
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 07, 2014, 10:39:52 AM
lawyer

a professional tasked with getting clients as much justice as they can afford
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on December 23, 2014, 12:35:08 PM
alpha male

a term previously used by anthropologists when speaking of non-human primates; it is currently used as a self-identifier by belligerent human males who aspire to match the brutish strength and utter stupidity of non-human primates
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: IoanC on December 23, 2014, 02:11:46 PM
nothing happened.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 27, 2015, 09:45:29 PM
ad hockery

Definition - reliance on temporary solutions rather than on consistent, long-term plans

Origin - ad hockery is the noun form of ad hoc, an adverb meaning "for the special purpose or end presently under consideration," translating literally from Latin as "for this." It entered English in the late 1800s

(http://cdn.rsvlts.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Ed-Hochuli1.jpeg)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: LenInSebastopol on February 28, 2015, 11:18:14 AM
Retromyngent: the ability to urinate while simultaneously walking backwards.

The above was a neologism used by a British explorer in the 19th century when reporting his observation of a specific tribal practice in Africa; fallen into disuse for some odd reason.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Peacemaker on March 03, 2015, 04:04:15 PM
Laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy

(lap”ər-ō-hĭs”tər-ō-sal-pĭng”gō-ō”ə-fôr-ek’tə-mē) n. Surgical removal of the female reproductive organs.

Example: Why should I a laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy when it’s so much easier to just cut off your balls?




Edit: I hope I don't get in trouble for this one.  ::)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Mor Ephrem on March 03, 2015, 06:00:05 PM
Laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy

(lap”ər-ō-hĭs”tər-ō-sal-pĭng”gō-ō”ə-fôr-ek’tə-mē) n. Surgical removal of the female reproductive organs.

Example: Why should I a laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy when it’s so much easier to just cut off your balls?




Edit: I hope I don't get in trouble for this one.  ::)

I don't know about trouble, that's up to the moderator of this section.  But certainly you need to take a basic biology course. 
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on March 03, 2015, 09:15:16 PM
Then I guess I will exute Asteriktos of his title as Grand Master Wordsmith.

As well you should. I wasn't even posting the correct word. I heard 'exute,' when apparently the right word was 'exeunt,' which is defined as "a stage direction in a printed play to indicate that a group of characters leave the stage." Oh. Yeah. That makes more sense in the context that I heard it in.  :-[  :D
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Peacemaker on March 03, 2015, 09:29:49 PM
Laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy

(lap”ər-ō-hĭs”tər-ō-sal-pĭng”gō-ō”ə-fôr-ek’tə-mē) n. Surgical removal of the female reproductive organs.

Example: Why should I a laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy when it’s so much easier to just cut off your balls?






Edit: I hope I don't get in trouble for this one.  ::)

I don't know about trouble, that's up to the moderator of this section.  But certainly you need to take a basic biology course.

HAHA not me, that was already written by someone else on my-weird-words.tumblr.com
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: hecma925 on March 03, 2015, 10:04:28 PM
Laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy

(lap”ər-ō-hĭs”tər-ō-sal-pĭng”gō-ō”ə-fôr-ek’tə-mē) n. Surgical removal of the female reproductive organs.

Example: Why should I a laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy when it’s so much easier to just cut off your balls?






Edit: I hope I don't get in trouble for this one.  ::)

I don't know about trouble, that's up to the moderator of this section.  But certainly you need to take a basic biology course.

HAHA not me, that was already written by someone else on my-weird-words.tumblr.com

That person needs a lesson in grammar.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on March 03, 2015, 11:44:31 PM
Cockalorum: "A little man with an exaggerated idea of his own importance."

One of my favorite words.  :)


Selam
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: LenInSebastopol on March 04, 2015, 10:16:21 AM
Still LOL
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on March 11, 2015, 04:34:01 PM
momism

excessive adulation of the mother and undue dependence on maternal care or protection, resulting in absence or loss of maturity and independence
 
 
--dictionary.com
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: LenInSebastopol on March 11, 2015, 07:37:09 PM
momism

excessive adulation of the mother and undue dependence on maternal care or protection, resulting in absence or loss of maturity and independence
--dictionary.com

First used by the author Philip Gordon Wylie in the 1942 book Generation of Vipers, which I urge all to read it....very interesting author too. Probably not at your local library.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Wylie
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on March 15, 2015, 04:34:20 PM
knackered

(British Slang) -- exhausted, very tired
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on March 28, 2015, 01:59:24 PM
Today's word of the day from (the email I get every day from) dictionary.com is:
 
pepper-upper

1. Informal. something, as a food, beverage, or pill, that provides a quick but temporary period of energy and alertness.
2. Informal. something added to food to relieve blandness.


Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on April 04, 2015, 12:43:05 PM
oology

the branch of ornithology that studies birds' eggs
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: hecma925 on April 04, 2015, 04:50:54 PM
incisive

adjective   \in-SYE-siv\

impressively direct and decisive (as in manner or presentation)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on April 09, 2015, 02:01:23 PM
brume

mist; fog

(dictionary.com word of the day)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: byhisgrace on April 14, 2015, 01:26:30 AM
*deleted*
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on April 14, 2015, 10:58:50 AM
argot

the special vocabulary and idiom of a particular profession or social group

a specialized idiomatic vocabulary peculiar to a particular class or group of people, especially that of an underworld group, devised for private communication and identification

(dictionary.com word of the day)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on June 11, 2015, 11:03:31 AM
dictionary.com word of the day:

'sblood   
\zbluhd\
interjection

1. Obsolete. a euphemistic shortening of God’s blood, used as an oath.

Quotes: 'Sblood, but you will not heare me, / If ever I did dreame of such a matter, abhorre me. (William Shakespeare [1564–1616], Othello, 1622)

Origin: 'Sblood entered English in the late 1500s and is a euphemistic shortening of the interjection God's blood.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: LenInSebastopol on June 17, 2015, 09:51:35 AM
Try:

'ZOUNDS, which is old English for "God's Wounds" and though the word is "obsolete", the notion is helpful still.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on June 17, 2015, 10:00:14 AM
Try:

'ZOUNDS, which is old English for "God's Wounds" and though the word is "obsolete", the notion is helpful still.

I thought that was an exclamation they used on Sbooby-Doo? Or was that ZOINKS... ???
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: LenInSebastopol on June 17, 2015, 11:47:54 AM
Try:

'ZOUNDS, which is old English for "God's Wounds" and though the word is "obsolete", the notion is helpful still.

I thought that was an exclamation they used on Sbooby-Doo? Or was that ZOINKS... ???

Wasn't there one for God's Eye? Can't recall persactly.
Sbooby Doo must have come out after I shot my tv.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 12, 2015, 10:40:46 AM
cachinnate

to laugh loudly or immoderately
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Arachne on July 12, 2015, 11:05:27 AM
exenteration

Surgical removal of the organs within a body cavity.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 24, 2015, 10:21:51 AM
persiflage

1. light, bantering talk or writing

2. a frivolous or flippant style of treating a subject

Persiflage entered English in the 1750s. It is derived from the French word persifler meaning "to banter."

Example: "Now go away then, and leave me alone. I don't want any more of your meretricious persiflage." (D.H. Lawrence, Women in Love, 1920)

http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/2015/07/24/persiflage
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on July 24, 2015, 11:37:30 AM
Ecdysiast

1. Stripper

Coined by H L Mencken on April 5, 1940.

Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 26, 2015, 10:01:55 PM
Ecdysiast

1. Stripper

Coined by H L Mencken on April 5, 1940.



This is a word I would have never expected from you... [smiley not used because I know you consider them evil]
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on July 26, 2015, 10:14:22 PM
adequataquaticism

the term used for all possible actions, words or art of an adequate nature; almost always said about something delightful or inspiring in its adequacy

Example: "Well, I'm off to astonish the world with more feats of adequataquaticism."

See also: adequacivity; adequatulence
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on July 27, 2015, 12:09:19 AM
Ecdysiast

1. Stripper

Coined by H L Mencken on April 5, 1940.



This is a word I would have never expected from you... [smiley not used because I know you consider them evil]

Thank you for keeping evil out of this thread. To clarify, I used to watch the Gypsy Rose Lee show in San Francisco as a kid. She was funny and tended tended to put her guests in somewhat absurd or awkward situations.

Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Minnesotan on July 27, 2015, 12:12:30 AM
ululation

Ululation is a howling or wailing sound. In many cultures, the sound of ululation is common at a funeral, while in others the mourners only sniffle quietly.

I first encountered this word in "Beyond the Wall of Sleep (http://www.hplovecraft.com/writings/texts/fiction/bws.aspx)".
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: LenInSebastopol on July 28, 2015, 01:33:59 PM
Ecdysiast

1. Stripper
J
Coined by H L Mencken on April 5, 1940.



This is a word I would have never expected from you... [smiley not used because I know you consider them evil]

Thank you for keeping evil out of this thread. To clarify, I used to watch the Gypsy Rose Lee show in San Francisco as a kid. She was funny and tended tended to put her guests in somewhat absurd or awkward situations.

Was that on 16th Street between Mission and Capp St., Homeboy?
But at the level of this verbiage she was an artwork.
 8)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on August 09, 2015, 06:30:42 PM
atrabilious
 
 \a-truh-BIL-yuh s\ 

1. gloomy; morose; melancholy; morbid.
2. irritable; bad-tempered; splenetic.

(dictionary.com)
 
 
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on August 23, 2015, 10:24:02 AM
quiddity

- the inherent nature or essence of someone or something.
- a distinctive feature; a peculiarity.

(dictionary.com)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on August 24, 2015, 06:12:54 AM
Cicatrice


1. Physiology. new tissue that forms over a wound and later contracts into a scar.

2. Botany. a scar left by a fallen leaf, seed, etc.



Selam
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Luke on November 23, 2015, 10:42:12 PM
Salmeagundi

sal·ma·gun·di
ˌsalməˈɡəndē/
noun
noun: salmagundi; plural noun: salmagundis
a dish of chopped meat, anchovies, eggs, onions, and seasoning.
a general mixture; a miscellaneous collection.
Origin

from French salmigondis, of unknown origin.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: William T on November 24, 2015, 12:08:02 AM
Ecdysiast

1. Stripper

Coined by H L Mencken on April 5, 1940.



I use a word he coined in my lexicon every so often:

  ombibulous - one who enjoys alcoholic beverages of any kind.


there may be a couple more of his words I use, but I can't think of any right now.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Arachne on December 01, 2015, 07:19:06 PM
tattie-bogle

/ˌtætɪˈboɡəl/
noun
1. (Scots) A scarecrow.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Mor Ephrem on December 05, 2015, 07:05:30 PM
phalleichmalosis
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on December 06, 2015, 12:52:58 AM
phalleichmalosis

jerk
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Mor Ephrem on December 06, 2015, 01:01:40 AM
phalleichmalosis

jerk

I'm afraid I don't follow.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on December 06, 2015, 05:15:20 PM
phalleichmalosis

jerk

I'm afraid I don't follow.

No definition was provided as per the format of this thread so I provided one that I thought was suitable. Nothing more than that.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: LenInSebastopol on December 13, 2015, 10:32:47 AM
phalleichmalosis

jerk

I'm afraid I don't follow.

No definition was provided as per the format of this thread so I provided one that I thought was suitable. Nothing more than that.

The word "jerk" seems the better description, since 'malosis' indicates sickness and irritation and 'phalle' points towards.....y'all studied Greek.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on December 14, 2015, 01:05:14 PM
HEISMAN!
  :) :) :)


Selam
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: LenInSebastopol on January 09, 2016, 10:12:12 AM
Deuterostomes: in embryology the first opening formed is the anus;
indicating that even before you opened your mouth, you were.......a mammal.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Mor Ephrem on January 09, 2016, 05:07:26 PM
to Morephremize
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on January 09, 2016, 11:28:14 PM
to Morephremize

If this is a word in common usage here, someone should inform the Ersatzian University Press for the next addition of  "Useful English Terms and Phrases". 
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: LenInSebastopol on January 09, 2016, 11:36:32 PM
to Morephremize

If this is a word in common usage here, someone should inform the Ersatzian University Press for the next addition of  "Useful English Terms and Phrases".

Do they include vulgarities?
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on January 10, 2016, 12:53:24 AM
to Morephremize

If this is a word in common usage here, someone should inform the Ersatzian University Press for the next addition of  "Useful English Terms and Phrases".

Do they include vulgarities?

I believe it is an Armenian publication and it is conceivable that vulgarities are as rare in Armenia as snakes are in Ireland. On the other hand, Dr. Erstazian was an entomologist who made his wealth in the 1960s based on the medicinal use of fly extracts.

If you bought some, you should be proud that the profits were donated towards good use.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Arachne on January 24, 2016, 09:39:55 AM
(https://scontent-lhr3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfa1/v/t1.0-9/1923251_10153790192257731_6099048982588041016_n.jpg?oh=3f1bd9d284de1e549466e0d3bd3badc7&oe=57341942)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: LenInSebastopol on January 24, 2016, 10:05:42 AM
Saccade, a noun: a rapid movement of the eye between fixation points.

It is noted in reading wherein one may be "blind" which may slow down reading speeds.
Also when viewing one thing and switching to another further away. 
Duration is 15 to 100 milliseconds.
Utilized in neuroscience for discussing such as well as REM sleep.
Some even apply such to thinking various thoughts!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 30, 2016, 06:25:38 PM
That's just spiffing!
Diamond, mate! Diamond!
Oh, Capital! Capital!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on January 30, 2016, 07:34:49 PM
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/chevre

Chèvre: French cheese made with goat's milk.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: hecma925 on January 31, 2016, 01:25:30 AM
Zeugma

(noun): the use of a word to modify or govern two or more words in such a way that it applies to each in a different sense or makes sense with only one (as in "opened the door and her heart to the homeless boy")
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: hecma925 on February 10, 2016, 02:28:07 AM
peccadillo

(noun): a slight offense
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Arachne on February 10, 2016, 12:10:59 PM
woebegone

woe·be·gone  (wō′bĭ-gôn′, -gŏn′)
adj.

1. Feeling, showing, or expressing deep sorrow, grief, or wretchedness.
2. Of an inferior or deplorable condition.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on February 11, 2016, 05:19:02 AM
Amaranthine

1. Of or relating to an Amaranth (an imaginary flower that never fades.)

2.  Eternally beautiful and unfading; everlasting.

3.  Deep purple-red.


Selam

Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 29, 2016, 11:03:15 PM
on fleek

on point, well put, in place, very good

ex: Man, that lecture by Metropolitan Kallistos about deificationary language on 13th century byzantine tombstones was on fleek fo sho! I'm never gonna think about those the same way again!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Iconodule on March 15, 2016, 04:35:36 PM
BEEVES

1. plural of beef: cows, bulls, or steers.

Example:

"[T]he Beeves were slain- / When straight the Gods fore-went their following paine/ With dire Ostents." (From Chapman's Odyssey)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Arachne on March 20, 2016, 04:46:17 PM
(https://scontent-ams3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xlp1/v/t1.0-9/12512394_619601201521282_6666879267906905528_n.jpg?oh=19415b6a6a6d3a3daf0748bf4e93c134&oe=574D86D0)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Tallitot on March 20, 2016, 07:25:42 PM
bal·der·dash
[ˈbôldərˌdaSH]
NOUN
senseless talk or writing; nonsense:
"she dismissed talk of plots as “bunkum and balderdash.”"
synonyms: rubbish · gibberish · claptrap · balderdash · blarney · [
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Arachne on April 10, 2016, 03:09:44 PM
(http://cdn.someecards.com/someecards/usercards/1332433349999_6421340.png)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: hecma925 on May 04, 2016, 01:34:15 AM
snuggery (noun):  a comfortable or cozy room
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on June 08, 2016, 05:53:47 PM
Australasia

1. Australia, New Zealand, and neighbouring islands in the S Pacific Ocean
2. (loosely) the whole of Oceania
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: hecma925 on June 09, 2016, 12:35:40 AM

passel
 
-a large number or amount
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Arachne on June 25, 2016, 12:56:08 PM
Hiraeth

Hiraeth /hɪəraɪ̯θ/ is a Welsh word that has no direct English translation. The University of Wales, Lampeter attempts to define it as homesickness tinged with grief or sadness over the lost or departed. It is a mix of longing, yearning, nostalgia, wistfulness, and the earnest desire for the Wales of the past.

Hiraeth bears considerable similarities with the Portuguese concept of saudade (a key theme in Fado music), Galician morriña and Romanian dor.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: hecma925 on June 25, 2016, 01:06:45 PM
polari, n. : /pəˈlɑːri/

A form of slang incorporating Italianate words, rhyming slang, cant terms, and other elements of vocabulary, which originated in England in the 18th and 19th centuries as a kind of secret language within various groups, including sailors, vagrants, circus people, entertainers, etc. Also occas. more generally (slang): talk, patter.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: William T on July 10, 2016, 03:15:38 AM
Another fun Mencken word, "bibliobibuli".

(from wiktionary)

Etymology
The term was coined in 1957 by H.L. Mencken, who said "There are people who read too much: the bibliobibuli". From the Greek "biblio", meaning books, and the Latin "bibulous", from "bibere" (to drink).

"There are people who read too much: bibliobibuli. I know some who are constantly drunk on books, as other men are drunk on whiskey or religion. They wander through this most diverting and stimulating of worlds in a haze, seeing nothing and hearing nothing".

Noun
bibliobibuli pl ‎(plural only)

The sort of people who read too much.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on July 10, 2016, 05:41:19 AM
Another fun Mencken word, "bibliobibuli".

(from wiktionary)

Etymology
The term was coined in 1957 by H.L. Mencken, who said "There are people who read too much: the bibliobibuli". From the Greek "biblio", meaning books, and the Latin "bibulous", from "bibere" (to drink).

"There are people who read too much: bibliobibuli. I know some who are constantly drunk on books, as other men are drunk on whiskey or religion. They wander through this most diverting and stimulating of worlds in a haze, seeing nothing and hearing nothing".

Noun
bibliobibuli pl ‎(plural only)

The sort of people who read too much.

Love the quote. Not a fan of Mencken, but I like this one.

Selam
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Arachne on December 12, 2016, 08:13:10 PM
nemophilist

(noun) A haunter of the woods.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: RaphaCam on December 13, 2016, 01:14:00 AM
I really like sycophant.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Arachne on March 10, 2017, 08:38:26 PM
komorebi

Sunlight filtering through the trees.

(https://scontent-lht6-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/17201268_1620551127959417_3300999732796403116_n.jpg?oh=3dfa53a4bc99a14d98ed06d185e75aa9&oe=59641471)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: RaphaCam on March 10, 2017, 09:33:16 PM
Endomingado

When you're bored, lazy and kinda sad because it's Sunday and tomorrow is Monday.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on March 12, 2017, 02:54:20 AM
amphigory

a meaningless or nonsensical piece of writing, especially one intended as a parody
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on March 31, 2017, 01:08:32 PM
splendiferous

splendid; magnificent; fine
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on March 31, 2017, 03:42:57 PM
Persnickety

Giving a lot of attention to details that are minor or not important.

The term, originally used to describe OO vs  EO discussions around the mid-5th century AD, was brought to Britain from Egypt by Richard of Cornwall around the mid-13th century  without the "s". Persnickety Americans returned the "s" to its rightful place in the mid-19th century.


Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on April 12, 2017, 06:45:50 PM
swag
verb. "to move heavily or unsteadily," 1520s, probably from Old Norse sveggja "to swing, sway," cognate with Old English swingan "to swing" (see swing ). Related: Swagged ; swagging.
noun. "ornamental festoon," 1794

a suspended wreath, garland, drapery, or the like, fastened up at or near each end and hanging down in the middle; festoon; a wreath, spray, or cluster of foliage, flowers, or fruit; a festoon, especially one very heavy toward the center

Slang: plunder; booty; money; valuables; free merchandise distributed as part of the promotion of a product, company, etc; self-confidence and personal style as shown by one's appearance and demeanor


Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on May 01, 2017, 11:12:33 PM
phenomenalize

to regard or interpret as a phenomenon
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Arachne on May 05, 2017, 06:16:28 PM
(http://www.motifake.com/image/demotivational-poster/1002/sarchasm-sarcasm-the-most-delicious-of-the-humors-demotivational-poster-1266401781.jpg)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on May 05, 2017, 11:24:25 PM
Thole: Endure

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/thole


Selam
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: William T on May 06, 2017, 12:32:40 AM
Allah:  Arabic for the God of Abraham
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on June 06, 2017, 07:43:41 PM
gyre

a ring or circle; a circular course or motion
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on June 12, 2017, 04:15:09 PM
twitterer

compulsive user of of the social media platform twitter; also known as a tweeter or a twit
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: RaphaCam on June 17, 2017, 01:39:23 PM
(https://scontent.fsdu5-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/19225907_1468032916589326_4104188547038179155_n.jpg?oh=1504ebfd096931d4a2c09e0b497416c2&oe=599F7685)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on August 28, 2017, 03:52:34 PM
factitious

not spontaneous or natural; artificial; contrived; manufactured; sham
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Iconodule on August 28, 2017, 04:18:46 PM
Spaewoman: A prophetess or female fortune teller. From Gaelic.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on October 01, 2017, 12:45:36 PM
phantosmia

Phantosmia (phantom smell), also called an olfactory hallucination, is smelling an odor that is not actually there. It can occur in one nostril or both. Unpleasant phantosmia, cacosmia, is more common and is often described as smelling something that is burned, foul, spoiled, or rotten. Experiencing occasional phantom smells is normal and usually goes away on its own in time. When hallucinations of this type do not seem to go away or when they keep coming back, it can be very upsetting and can disrupt an individual's quality of life.

Olfactory hallucinations can be caused by common medical conditions such as nasal infections, nasal polyps, or dental problems. It can result from neurological conditions such as migraines, head injuries, strokes, Parkinson's disease, seizures, or brain tumors. It can also be a symptom of certain mental disorders such as depression, bipolar disorder, intoxication or withdrawal from drugs and alcohol, or psychotic disorders. Environmental exposures are sometimes the cause as well, such as smoking, exposure to certain types of chemicals (e.g., insecticides or solvents), or radiation treatment for head or neck cancer.

(wiki (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phantosmia))
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on October 25, 2017, 04:56:49 PM
dotty

1. crazy or eccentric.

2. feeble or unsteady in gait.

3. very enthusiastic or infatuated (usually followed by about or over).

Origin of dotty: 1805-1815, perhaps variant of dotard + -y

(source and inspiration: dictionary.com + idubbbztv)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on November 01, 2017, 07:43:05 PM
Nireland

Introduced this day by the  Associated Press.

Definition: Northern Ireland.

Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on November 05, 2017, 01:58:31 AM
desuetude

the state of being no longer used or practiced
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on November 19, 2017, 12:52:50 AM
sub-STAN-tive
or
SUB-sten-tive
?
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Mor Ephrem on November 19, 2017, 01:49:37 PM
SUB-sten-tive

^That. 

Sometimes I hear "SUB-sten-uh-tive", and I want to punch those people in the face. 
Title: Word of the day
Post by: mcarmichael on January 17, 2018, 02:32:21 AM
Pronoia:
From wikipedia: "Pronoia can be defined as the opposite of paranoia. A person suffering from paranoia suspects that persons or entities (e.g. governments/deities) conspire against them. A person experiencing pronoia feels that the world around them conspires to do them good."

I'm curious how it would be used as an adjective. It's tasteless. Who wouldn't be pronoid? "Did you see the sunrise? It made me so pronoid, I didn't know what to do!"
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on January 19, 2018, 12:54:33 PM
Pronoia:
From wikipedia: "Pronoia can be defined as the opposite of paranoia. A person suffering from paranoia suspects that persons or entities (e.g. governments/deities) conspire against them. A person experiencing pronoia feels that the world around them conspires to do them good."

I'm curious how it would be used as an adjective. It's tasteless. Who wouldn't be pronoid? "Did you see the sunrise? It made me so pronoid, I didn't know what to do!"

I am really pronoid about what Bob, Ted, Carol and Alice will be getting me for my birthday this year Ann. I am almost certain it will be a box of Nicorette gum, one year membership to a gym, a box set of non-alcoholic wines, and a gift certificate to a brothel in Nevada.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 19, 2018, 09:58:13 PM
propinquity

the state of being close to someone or something; proximity
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on January 19, 2018, 11:50:37 PM
torse
noun
Heraldry

    A wreath.

Origin

Late 16th century: from obsolete French, from Latin torta, feminine past participle of torquere ‘twist’.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/torse
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on January 31, 2018, 02:41:05 PM
Despite all the warnings you’ve heard
Irregardless is really a word
This linguistic bacteria
Meets our criteria
Even though you might think it absurd

We Made You a Bunch of Usage Limericks (https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/usage-limericks/amuse-bemuse)

I, for one, am glad someone is standing up for this word. (Not that I would use it in any place important, especially if the grammar gestapo are patrolling.)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Ainnir on February 09, 2018, 11:03:00 PM
obfuscate

1. a: to throw into shadow
    b: to make obscure

2. confuse

3. to be evasive, unclear, or confusing
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Luke on April 09, 2018, 10:56:06 PM
Punc·til·i·ous

adjective
showing great attention to detail or correct behavior.
"he was punctilious in providing every amenity for his guests"
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on April 17, 2018, 09:42:33 PM
unputdownable

As used in a sentence (from a novel blurb): "An unputdownable novel about the Empress Theodora, considered by many the most influential and powerful woman in the history of the Byzantine Empire."
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on April 25, 2018, 02:09:37 AM
gobsmacked

when someone, while in the process of eating a gob, is struck with an open fist (usually to the head)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on August 03, 2018, 11:40:18 PM
eunuchry

the state of being a eunuch
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Orthodox_Slav on August 04, 2018, 01:33:46 PM
squiz

to peer at quickly and closely.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: hecma925 on August 04, 2018, 01:49:23 PM
gobsmacked

when someone, while in the process of eating a gob, is struck with an open fist (usually to the head)

What if it is gorn on the gob?
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on August 09, 2018, 01:33:22 AM
obfuscate

1. a: to throw into shadow
    b: to make obscure

2. confuse

3. to be evasive, unclear, or confusing

One of my favorites.  :)

Selam
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Brilko on August 09, 2018, 03:48:12 AM
Pronoia:
From wikipedia: "Pronoia can be defined as the opposite of paranoia. A person suffering from paranoia suspects that persons or entities (e.g. governments/deities) conspire against them. A person experiencing pronoia feels that the world around them conspires to do them good."

I'm curious how it would be used as an adjective. It's tasteless. Who wouldn't be pronoid? "Did you see the sunrise? It made me so pronoid, I didn't know what to do!"

Pronoid. A song that we would have gotten had Bobby McFerrin been in Black Sabbath.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Iconodule on August 09, 2018, 06:03:56 AM
Pronoia:
From wikipedia: "Pronoia can be defined as the opposite of paranoia. A person suffering from paranoia suspects that persons or entities (e.g. governments/deities) conspire against them. A person experiencing pronoia feels that the world around them conspires to do them good."

I'm curious how it would be used as an adjective. It's tasteless. Who wouldn't be pronoid? "Did you see the sunrise? It made me so pronoid, I didn't know what to do!"

Pronoid. A song that we would have gotten had Bobby McFerrin been in Black Sabbath.

Ha, nice!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on August 22, 2018, 08:53:14 PM
malversation

corrupt behavior in a position of trust, especially in public office
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: RaphaCam on August 29, 2018, 12:54:58 AM
qualtagh

In the Isle of Man, the first person one finds after leaving someone else's home, specially on January 1st.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Tallitot on August 29, 2018, 03:45:15 AM
Pareidolia

a psychological phenomenon in which the mind responds to a stimulus, usually an image or a sound, by perceiving a familiar pattern where none exists; i.e. the "face" on Mars.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on September 08, 2018, 06:15:07 PM
defenestrate

1. [rare] throw (someone) out of a window. "she had made up her mind that the woman had been defenestrated, although the official verdict had been suicide"

2. [informal] remove or dismiss (someone) from a position of power or authority. "the overwhelming view is that he should be defenestrated before the next election"
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Justin Kolodziej on September 08, 2018, 08:52:32 PM
Gaimansplaining

When You Explain Neil Gaiman's Career to Neil Gaiman, Gaimansplaining Is Born (http://www.theouthousers.com/index.php/news/141230-when-you-explain-neil-gaimans-career-to-neil-gaiman-gaimainsplaining-is-born.html)

 :laugh:
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on September 15, 2018, 09:07:44 PM
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/meeple

A small figure used as a playing piece in certain board games, having a stylized human form.
‘each player is given eight wooden meeples’
‘you can't move a meeple over a bridge unless a meeple is on the bridge’
‘at least two big meeple were stuck in that city for almost the entire game’

Origin

Early 21st century: apparently a blend of my and a phonetic respelling of people and first used with reference to the board game Carcassonne.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on September 21, 2018, 10:06:05 PM
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/synchronous

Definition of synchronous in English:

synchronous
adjective

    1Existing or occurring at the same time.
    ‘glaciations were approximately synchronous in both hemispheres’

2 Astronomy
Making or denoting an orbit around the earth or another celestial body in which one revolution is completed in the period taken for the body to rotate about its axis.

Origin

Mid 17th century: from late Latin synchronus (from Greek sunkhronos, from sun- ‘together’ + khronos ‘time’) + -ous.
Pronunciation
synchronous/ˈsɪŋkrənəs/
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on September 25, 2018, 03:18:37 AM
Definition of pelage in English:

pelage
noun
mass nounZoology

    The fur, hair, or wool of a mammal.


https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/pelage/?utm_source=wotd-english&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=wotd
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on October 12, 2018, 01:43:09 PM
susurration

Definition of susurration in English:

susurration
(also susurrus)
noun
mass nounliterary

    Whispering or rustling.
    ‘the susurration of the river’

Origin

Late Middle English: from late Latin susurratio(n-), from Latin susurrare ‘to murmur, hum’, from susurrus ‘whisper’.
Pronunciation
susurration/ˌsuːsʌˈreɪʃ(ə)n/


https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/susurration/?utm_source=wotd-english&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=wotd
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Opus118 on October 15, 2018, 01:04:11 AM
susurration

Definition of susurration in English:

susurration
(also susurrus)
noun
mass nounliterary

    Whispering or rustling.
    ‘the susurration of the river’

Origin

Late Middle English: from late Latin susurratio(n-), from Latin susurrare ‘to murmur, hum’, from susurrus ‘whisper’.
Pronunciation
susurration/ˌsuːsʌˈreɪʃ(ə)n/


https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/susurration/?utm_source=wotd-english&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=wotd (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/susurration/?utm_source=wotd-english&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=wotd)
Nice!
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on October 18, 2018, 02:17:52 PM
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/rete/?utm_source=wotd-english&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=wotd

Rete

Definition of rete in English:

rete
noun
Anatomy

    An elaborate network of blood vessels or nerve cells.

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin rete ‘net’.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: mcarmichael on October 18, 2018, 11:09:23 PM
Pareidolia

a psychological phenomenon in which the mind responds to a stimulus, usually an image or a sound, by perceiving a familiar pattern where none exists; i.e. the "face" on Mars.
Thanks for that. Not that I understand it.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on October 25, 2018, 01:07:50 AM
https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

Word of the Day : October 25, 2018

fugacious


adjective fyoo-GAY-shus
Prev
Next

Definition

: lasting a short time : evanescent
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on October 25, 2018, 11:34:04 PM
susurration

Definition of susurration in English:

susurration
(also susurrus)
noun
mass nounliterary

    Whispering or rustling.
    ‘the susurration of the river’

Origin

Late Middle English: from late Latin susurratio(n-), from Latin susurrare ‘to murmur, hum’, from susurrus ‘whisper’.
Pronunciation
susurration/ˌsuːsʌˈreɪʃ(ə)n/


https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/susurration/?utm_source=wotd-english&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=wotd (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/susurration/?utm_source=wotd-english&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=wotd)
Nice!

Yeah, I like this one. Sort of an onomatopoeia. Thanks for sharing.  :)

Selam
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on October 26, 2018, 12:21:32 AM
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/gegenschein

gegenschein

Astronomy

    A patch of very faint nebulous light sometimes seen in the night sky opposite the position of the sun. It is thought to be the image of the sun reflected from gas and dust outside the atmosphere.

Origin

Late 19th century: German Gegenschein, from gegen ‘opposite’ + Schein ‘glow, shine’.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on November 02, 2018, 02:44:43 PM
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/daisy-cutter

Daisy-cutter

Definition of daisy-cutter in English:
daisy-cutter
NOUN
informal
1British (in sport) a ball hit or bowled so as to roll along the ground.

Example sentences
2An immensely powerful aerial bomb that derives its destructive power from the mixture of ammonium nitrate and aluminum powder with air.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on November 14, 2018, 02:50:16 AM
untrammeled

not deprived of freedom of action or expression; not restricted or hampered
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: SolEX01 on January 22, 2019, 10:48:25 PM
Avolition

a lack of interest or engagement in goal-directed behavior
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: biro on January 22, 2019, 11:27:50 PM
Definition of clowder in English:

clowder
noun
rare

    A group of cats.
    ‘most of us aren't looking to bring a pack of dogs or a clowder of cats’

Origin

Early 19th century: from dialect cludder ‘clutter’, probably related to clot.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/clowder
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on January 23, 2019, 12:07:00 AM
Avolition

a lack of interest or engagement in goal-directed behavior

Nice. I love words that roll off the tongue and have relevant meaning.

Selam
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: SolEX01 on January 23, 2019, 12:23:09 AM
Avolition

a lack of interest or engagement in goal-directed behavior

Nice. I love words that roll off the tongue and have relevant meaning.

Selam

I find it surprising that the word doesn't exist in the Oxford online dictionary.  The word exactly describes my condition.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on January 23, 2019, 12:55:17 AM
Why isn't "Palindrome" a palindrome?

Questions that keep me up at night.

Selam
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: RaphaCam on January 31, 2019, 03:46:34 PM
Why isn't "Palindrome" a palindrome?

Questions that keep me up at night.

Selam
I would love "pangram" to be a pangram.

SelamaleS
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: WPM on January 31, 2019, 04:44:22 PM
Fictitious
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 21, 2019, 03:08:18 PM
How do you pronounce "Thebaid"?
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: hecma925 on February 21, 2019, 03:41:22 PM
Thee-bay-id, although I've heard thuh-buy-id.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on February 21, 2019, 04:06:15 PM
Thanks  :)
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: RaphaCam on February 21, 2019, 05:00:11 PM
Given Karaite is KARR-ə-yte and Thebes is THEEBS, I'd go with THEE-bə-id.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: mcarmichael on March 01, 2019, 08:52:34 PM
"Facetious" apparently does not mean what I thought it meant. It always seemed facetious to me to say facetious, so I never really presented anyone with the opportunity to correct me.
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: mcarmichael on March 06, 2019, 06:43:25 PM
"Facetious" apparently does not mean what I thought it meant. It always seemed facetious to me to say facetious, so I never really presented anyone with the opportunity to correct me.
This is going to take some time to digest. The way I would have used it would have been similar (I think) to "Pedantic".
Like, "I don't mean to be facetious, but it really isn't tomorrow so I'm not working tomorrow."
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: Asteriktos on November 04, 2019, 03:50:41 PM
Thames

so with the differing pronunciations of this, is it a thing where people in different areas of England pronounce it differently, or does everyone just choose for themselves, or what?
Title: Re: Word of the day
Post by: WPM on November 04, 2019, 09:30:33 PM
Just pronounced as your hearing from spoken memory.