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General Forums => Reviews => Topic started by: JoeZollars on May 10, 2004, 11:54:42 AM

Title: What is everyone reading?
Post by: JoeZollars on May 10, 2004, 11:54:42 AM
This is just a thread to ask what everyone is reading.  Till Wendsday I will be reading nothing other than textbooks, but after that---ooh man do I ever have a stack to get through.  As soon as I am done with my finals, I am making it top priority to finish Law of God.

Joe Zollars
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: JoeZollars on May 10, 2004, 11:55:35 AM
hmm come to think of it, perhaps I should find myself a short fiction book in order to give my mind a break and time to recooperate.

Joe Zollars
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jakub on May 10, 2004, 12:56:22 PM
Faith wise I'm reading Jesus through the Centuries, His place in the History of Culture, by Jaroslav Pelikan.

I'm re-reading Lonesome Dove can't count the previous times, I'm just a old west fan.


james
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: David on May 10, 2004, 01:52:51 PM
Currently reading:
Teach Yourself Islam (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0844237469/qid=1084211462/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/102-1913742-9328919?v=glance&s=books&n=507846) (doing a cursory study on Islam right now)
The One Straw Revolution: An Introdution to Natural Farming (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0878572201/qid=1084211518/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1__i1_xgl14/102-1913742-9328919?v=glance&s=books) by Masanobu Fukuoka

edited to remove freudian slip
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: JoeZollars on May 10, 2004, 02:02:00 PM
hmm interesting books.

Joe Zollars
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on May 10, 2004, 02:33:21 PM
Quote
hmm come to think of it, perhaps I should find myself a short fiction book in order to give my mind a break and time to recooperate.

Have you ever read the Brother Cadfael novels by Ellis Peters?  Set in 12th century Shrewsbury at the Benedictine monastery of Sts. PEter and Paul, I think you'd really like them.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Father Peter on May 10, 2004, 03:41:55 PM
Ecclesiastical Latin by John F. Collins
Acts of the Second Council of Ephesus by Rev S.G.F. Perry
D+¬fense des Trois Chapitres par Facundus D'Hermiane
Three Monophysite Christologies by Roberta Chesnut

and waiting for another Terry Pratchett book to come along.

Peter Theodore
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Brigid of Kildare on May 10, 2004, 04:32:41 PM
What do you think of the Collins Ecclesiastical Latin, sub-deacon Peter? I've recently tracked down a copy of it through ABE books, but am too bogged down in the Jones and Sidwell Reading Latin course at present to get into it yet.

Brigid
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Father Peter on May 10, 2004, 04:41:11 PM
I've decided I need to learn Latin, at least before I get to heaven so I can understand St Peter at the gates. :)

I'm on chapter 2 and finding it fine so far. It suggests just a semester (whatever that is) to get through a large chunk of the grammar and vocab and into the reading. I expect it to be fairly technical, and it is, but in a way that I'm coping with fine. if I can spare 30 mins a day - as it suggests - then I may end up being able to read some of the important books I have lined up that scholars have only seen fit to translate out of Syriac (my life isn't going to be long enough to try and learn Syriac) and into Latin. (thanks guys, great help).

As you can see I am trying to work on my French, and that's not coming on too bad, and I'm reading some important stuff that's made its way out of Latin into French.

After all that I need Terry Pratchett
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. David on May 10, 2004, 05:12:44 PM
Patristic Homilies on the Dormition of the Mother of God
Retrato en Sep+¡a by Isabel Allende
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jakub on May 25, 2004, 03:06:48 PM
I just aquired a very good used revised edition of The Ladder of Divine Ascent by St. John Climacus, published by the Holy Transfiguration Monastery while in Las Vegas this weekend and find the intro useful already and are looking forward to much more.

james
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Doubting Thomas on May 25, 2004, 04:14:29 PM
Call it ADD, but I seem to have a habit of reading multiple books at once.  Currently, I'm reading: (1) The Lord of the Rings (resuming after a 3 month hiatus) (2) Deliver Us From Evil by Sean Hannity; and (3) Not By Scripture Alone by Robert Sungenis
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Oblio on May 25, 2004, 04:19:20 PM
The New History of the World - Roberts

Being an engineer, I have had 1 post-secondary history course, and that was American History.  Other than reading about the Church or light Nat. Geo. or Discovery/History channel pablum, that's all I've had.  I thought this might peak an interest in certain areas or at least allow me to follow historical conversations without nodding off. :D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Columcille on May 26, 2004, 07:01:16 AM
"Mr. Jefferson's Lost Cause, Land, Farmers,Slavery, and the Louisisana Purchase", by Roger G. Kennedy.

"Inheriting Paradise, Meditations on Gardening", by Vigen Guroian.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: JoeS on May 26, 2004, 09:24:42 AM
A Season in Bethlehem by Joshua Hammer put out by FP free press, 274 pages, purchased at Barnes and Noble.

This book helps explain in detail about life in Palestine especially for the Palestinian Christians who are caught between Hamas and Israel. It also covers the moment-to-moment narration of the siege of the Church of the Nativity. It tells of the hardships of living in one of the most dangerous places on earth.

JoeS   :-";"xx
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: David on May 26, 2004, 10:27:25 AM

"Inheriting Paradise, Meditations on Gardening", by Vigen Guroian.

Interesting, I had just ordered this book from Amazon.  It should arrive today or tomorrow.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on July 07, 2004, 04:58:03 PM
I'm currently reading the 3rd Volume of the Gulag Archipelago.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Antonious Nikolas on July 07, 2004, 08:13:56 PM
E.A. Wallis Budge's translation of Paradise of the Holy Fathers vol. II

Selected passages from Wace & Piercy's Dictionary of Early Christian Biography (right now I'm on Eusebius of Dorylaeum...)

And just for fun, Raymond Chandler's Farwell, My Lovely.  I want to see how much he really influenced Robert Parker.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TomS on July 07, 2004, 09:12:53 PM
I am reading "From Mars Hill to Manhattan" The story of  the Greek Orthodox in America under Athenagoras I by Bishop George Papaioannou

And

"The Inner Kingdom" by Bishop Ware.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: J on July 07, 2004, 09:16:59 PM
The Code of The Warrior, Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them, Constantinople, The Book of The Samurai, and The Layman's Guide to The Ladder (all at once!  I'm horrible!)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Elisha on July 07, 2004, 09:47:28 PM
The Sword of the Propehet by Serge Trifkovic (Regina Orthodox Press).  "The politically incorrect guide to Islam."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tallitot on July 07, 2004, 09:49:36 PM
The Journey to Heaven by St. Tikhon
Nihilism, by Seraphim Rose
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Frobie on July 07, 2004, 11:38:59 PM
Catechism of the Catholic Church and Companion to the Catechism of the Catholic Church
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Columcille on July 08, 2004, 07:01:11 AM
"Home Economics" by Wendell Berry
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Νεκτάριος on July 08, 2004, 08:44:32 AM
The Evergetinos published by CTOS and the Areana by Saint Ignatii.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ania on July 08, 2004, 09:36:22 AM
Jingo-Terry Pratchett (5th book by him in 3 weeks, am quickly becoming addicted)
Don Quixote- (struggling, but I will finish it... some day)
My Life in Christ (in Russian, so it will take me a while... but I will finish it...)

Shultz... Brother Cadfael books are wonderful, read a few myself.  Mom used to rent the movies too.  My faves... "Virgin in the Ice" & "Leper of St. Giles."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on July 08, 2004, 10:25:12 AM
The Code of The Warrior, Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them, Constantinople, The Book of The Samurai, and The Layman's Guide to The Ladder (all at once!  I'm horrible!)

Horrible?!?  Sounds perfectly normal to me! :D

There are the bedside table books, the bathroom reading, the living room stack, the one in the car or purse or pocket etc etc.

I learned from my father to always have something to read with me, just in case I have to wait for someone or something.  He always has at least a little Bridge or Stamp-collecting magazine in his pocket.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Brendan03 on July 08, 2004, 10:28:46 AM
Ah, let's see.

Currently reading "Mona Lisa Overdrive" by William Gibson.  When I'm done with that one I'm going to take a holiday from Gibson and move on to "Cryptonomicon" by Neal Stephenson, which I've been wanting to read for a while and which, due to its length, will easily take me through the rest of the summer and likely into the fall.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Mor Ephrem on July 08, 2004, 11:58:08 AM
Christ Is in Our Midst: Letters from a Russian Monk, by Father John, and The Message of the Bible: An Orthodox Christian Perspective, by George Cronk (haven't started it yet, but mean to soon).  

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jakub on July 08, 2004, 03:47:18 PM
Very slowly reading The Ladder of Divine Ascent, letting it soak into all the crevices of my humble :P gray matter.

james
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: formerroadie on July 17, 2004, 02:18:41 PM
St. John Chrysostom - On marriage and Family
Kelly - Early Christian Doctrine
Oxford History of Ancient Egypt

Next: Orthodox Psychotherapy
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. David on July 18, 2004, 01:01:08 AM
TPR Storytelling -- a guide for teaching Spanish-language acquisition through aural/kinetic interaction. (iow, listen and respond with an action.)

The Orthodox Way by +KALLISTOS Ware
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Columcille on July 18, 2004, 07:38:58 AM
Dear Mr. Jefferson, Letters from a Nantucket Gardener, by Laura Simon.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: JoeS on July 18, 2004, 04:15:02 PM
SHADOW DIVERS, by Robert Kurson.  The real life discovery of WWII German U-Boat U-851 just off the coast of Northern New Jersey is fraught with mystery and extreme danger.  As a SCUBA diver this book is a must if you have any interest in underwater discovery.

JoeS
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ExOrienteLux on July 19, 2004, 01:43:16 PM
Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev and One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.  Nothin' like trying to get a jump on Russian Lit for next semester.  Too bad I have to read Toltoy's Resurrection as well.  I tried to start it, and I couldn't really get into it.  That, plus the fact that he was excommunicated makes me kind of un-eager to read anything by him.  At least there's Dostoevsky to offset it.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: spartacus on August 16, 2004, 04:22:41 PM
I am currently reading the Gospel according to Luke.....

My priest made refernce to it is in Homilee on the Feast of the DOrmition of the Theotokos and refernced several verses that explain why we should call her blessed, honor and revere her.

As usual for me...once I start a Book in the New Testament I keep on reading.....

Prior to that it was the Book of Psalms. I started focusing on Psalms in my Dad's last days on this earth and just kept reading them...Some like 20, 23 and 85....reapeatedly.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: JohnCassian on August 16, 2004, 05:06:00 PM
Books I Just Finished:

Extracanonical Sayings of Jesus - Stroker
The New Testament Text of Gregory of Nyssa - Brooks
Marriage: An Orthodox Perspective - Meyendorff

Book I'm in the Middle Of:

Mysterious Encounters at Mamre and Jabbok - Miller

Next Up:

Zipora Talhir's two volume introduction and text-critical commentary to I Esdras
Penitential Prayer in Second Temple Judaism: The Development of a Religious Institution - Werline

Yes, I know. I'm a total nerd.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ExOrienteLux on August 17, 2004, 08:12:11 AM
I gave up on the Russian lit books after struggling through the uncompleted part of Gogol's Dead Souls , so now I'm reading something for my enjoyment, although it's a lot more difficult than Russian Lit: Vladimir Lossky's The Image and Likeness of God .  Should be interesting.

+IC XC NIKA+
Josh.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ania on August 17, 2004, 10:05:07 AM
The Perfect Heresy: The Revolutionary Life and Death of the Medieval Cathars - O'Shea
Guards! Guards! - Terry Pratchett
Introduction to Islam
Beowolf
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on August 17, 2004, 11:18:34 AM
"Stiff" by Mary Roach - an interesting book about the "life" of cadavers

and

the Summer 2004 issue of the ALA Law Library Journal
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. David on August 17, 2004, 03:59:22 PM
Anna Karenina
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: LilLamb on October 19, 2004, 01:21:19 PM
I am reading St Seraphim of Sarov A Spiritual Biography by Archimandrite Lazarus Moore, and also am reading Don Quixote.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PaulP on November 03, 2004, 06:56:41 PM
My wife bought me a book from Barnes and Noble called JOHN 1:12. The book traces several months of bizarre supernatural events that happened in Dallas Texas. I've got to admit, the book has caught my attention, it's a good read. ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: WillE on November 04, 2004, 08:04:09 PM
Hello Paul,
I read John 1:12 too, it had witchcraft, demonic activity, things floating in the air... you get the gist but church members and evangelist prevail at the end. I was satisfied with it.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tallitot on November 05, 2004, 02:36:21 AM
Meditations on the Divine Liturgy, by Nikolai Gogol, printed by Holy Trinity Monastery Jordanville, NY, 3rd printing 1995.  Not difficult reading but deep and moving.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nacho on November 05, 2004, 04:08:55 AM
Currently reading Zen in the markets: Confessions of a Samurai Trader

Pretty good stuff if you are into investing :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EsterR on November 17, 2004, 08:25:37 PM
I finished reading this book I heard about on this thread. It's called JOHN 1:12. It is a fascinating read!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Pravoslavbob on December 02, 2004, 12:58:58 AM
The Orthodox Liturgy:  The Development of the Eucharistic Liturgy in the Byzantine Rite.  by Hugh Wybrew.

(among other things.)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ephraim on December 21, 2004, 09:42:44 PM
A Place of Healing for the Soul by John France.  (Former BBC religious commentator moves to Patmos and converts.)
Patmos:  Isle of the Apocalypse by Dennis Engleman.  (Picture book of Patmos so I can see sites mentioned in above.)

Just bought Epistles of Elder Paisios
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: penelope on December 22, 2004, 01:50:41 AM
Working on Schmemann's Introduction to Liturgical Theology...a controversial one, but pretty good.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nacho on December 22, 2004, 02:02:32 AM
Quote
Working on Schmemann's Introduction to Liturgical Theology...a controversial one, but pretty good.

I've never read that one. Please give an update here once you are done reading it. He's one of my favorite author's to read.  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Sean on December 22, 2004, 11:46:28 PM
I'm reading Wisdom From Mount Athos, by St. Silouan the Athonite. I'm also reading a new book called Templars In America, about apparent evidence of the Earl Henry St. Clair and the Venetian sailor Antonio Zeno making a trans-atlantic voyage to North America in the fourteenth century.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TomS on December 23, 2004, 12:14:02 AM
I am reading: "Some Heresies of Evangelicalism and an Orthodox Response" from the essays entitled "The Church, Tradition, Scripture, Truth, and Christian Life" by Hierodeacon Gregory. Published by the Center for Traditionalist Orthodox Studies.


Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on December 26, 2004, 12:47:50 AM
A History of the Byzantine State and Society, by Warren Treadgold
Divine Rhetoric, by Jaroslav Pelikan
Socratic Logic, by Peter Kreeft

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. David on December 26, 2004, 02:28:09 AM
The Winter Pascha by Fr. Thomas Hopko

The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on December 26, 2004, 03:39:48 PM
Quote
The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien

aw man, GREAT read! enjoy it Pedro! (glad to have u back posting, btw ;) ) 

As for me, I'm between books right now...just finished a children's book about confession (children's book as in it has a LOT of text and icons/icon-like illustrations and is meant to be read TO children by an adult), called The Path To Confession, by Fr. Artemy Vladimirov, lent to me by my priest...and I haven't decided what I am moving onto next (I have a pile to choose from) :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Protopsalti on December 26, 2004, 05:19:15 PM
I began today reading the life of St. Nektarios Pentapoleos, 2 days ago I visited the place where he lived in Cairo and got the chance to enter his room and his office where he wrote his famous letters, it's a different feeling
May his Prayers be with all of Us. Amen
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. David on December 29, 2004, 10:45:22 AM
aw man, GREAT read! enjoy it Pedro!

Well, I would, but my wife has hijacked it!   :(  She's got a slow stretch at work, with some time to read, so she's going through it.  Really likes it, she says.

Quote
(glad to have u back posting, btw ;) ) 

Hey, thanks.  Good to be back.

So, since I've finished Winter Pascha and have lost (for the moment) Tolkien, I'm reading an alternative history/sci-fi paperback by a guy named Harry Turtledove.  It's called Guns of the South, a sort of "what-if" novel where the Confederacy wins the Civil War and successfully secedes from the Union.

Good writing so far; the only part I don't like is that the sci-fi aspect is white racists from 150 years in the future travel back to supply the South w/ AK-47s to win the war...once again, making the secession of the South all about slavery... >:( >:( >:(
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on January 01, 2005, 12:56:06 PM
A History of the Byzantine State and Society, by Warren Treadgold
Divine Rhetoric, by Jaroslav Pelikan
The Life in Christ, by St. Nicholas Cabasilas
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on January 01, 2005, 03:02:24 PM
sigh, i got side tracked from my readings about the Church (i have a whole stack of books, unread), and picked up instead the 2nd and 3rd installments of Philip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" series (genre: fantasy)...the books are called The Subtle Knife (which i finished yesterday) and The Amber Spyglass, which i am working on now...i had read the 1st installment, The Golden Compass, last summer, and planned to get back to the series eventually...from a Church perspective, it is a very interesting series, to say the least.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Marjorie on January 01, 2005, 03:56:12 PM
I finished a bunch of the books I was reading all at once (On the Incarnation by Athanasius, The Winter Pascha, Fr. Arseny, Touching Heaven, The Master and Margarita, and so on...) so now I'm reading Jesus Through the Centuries by Jaroslav Pelikan and then I'm going to finish the journals of Fr. Schmemann.

Marjorie
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on January 01, 2005, 09:14:57 PM
A History of the Byzantine State and Society, by Warren Treadgold
Divine Rhetoric, by Jaroslav Pelikan
The Life in Christ, by St. Nicholas Cabasilas
I'm impressed, Paradosis.

Perhaps you might care to lend or sell these to your neighbor Aristokles when you're done?

Demetri
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on January 01, 2005, 10:05:14 PM
Sure... if we ever meet, lol. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on January 02, 2005, 12:38:45 AM
Sure... if we ever meet, lol. :)

How true! Shame on both of us. Our respective parishes are less than 3 miles apart and we both drive over an hour to get to them!  :-[

Actually, if crusty old Aristokles's gout doesn't subside by tomorrow morn, he'll be going to church via the internet. Poor substitute.  :-

Demetri
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Pravoslavbob on January 02, 2005, 08:34:57 PM
I finished a bunch of the books I was reading all at once (On the Incarnation by Athanasius, The Winter Pascha, Fr. Arseny, Touching Heaven, The Master and Margarita, and so on...) so now I'm reading Jesus Through the Centuries by Jaroslav Pelikan and then I'm going to finish the journals of Fr. Schmemann.

Marjorie

How have you found the journals so far?  I have read only a few entries. 

Bob
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: penelope on January 09, 2005, 06:22:18 PM


I've never read that one. Please give an update here once you are done reading it. He's one of my favorite author's to read. :)
Apologies for the slow response...with Christmas and everything else going on right now, the book took me obscenely long to finish.  Overall, I'd recommend the book, although it's not exactly a "good read".  It's dull, but worth the effort.  Schmemann argues that the orginal and best form of the liturgy was obscured by monastic and Roman imperial developments in the fourth and fifth centuries, and that the underlying "lex orandi" became more difficult to see because of this.  He looks specifically at issues surrounding the theology of time, which was especially useful to me personally.  In the final chapter, the tone becomes somewhat more positive in talking about the "Byzantine synthesis" which combined the two approaches, removing some of the excesses of both.  His final argument seems to be that although fourth century and later developments make it harder to see the original "lex orandi", a "restoration" of pre-Constantinian worship is impossible and not necessarily even desirable.  Instead, he argues that "liturgical theology" should be further pursued to clarify these matters.  One subsidiary point that's somewhat prominent is an attack on the more extreme liturgical conservatives.  Overall, though, the historical portions of this book are much more developed than the theological interpretation.  That would be my main criticism, that a lot of the aspects of the work could have used some further development, but overall I recommend it, and tend generally to agree with Schmemann's conclusions.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: jmbejdl on February 02, 2005, 08:24:21 AM


Well, I would, but my wife has hijacked it! :( She's got a slow stretch at work, with some time to read, so she's going through it. Really likes it, she says.



Hey, thanks. Good to be back.

So, since I've finished Winter Pascha and have lost (for the moment) Tolkien, I'm reading an alternative history/sci-fi paperback by a guy named Harry Turtledove. It's called Guns of the South, a sort of "what-if" novel where the Confederacy wins the Civil War and successfully secedes from the Union.

Good writing so far; the only part I don't like is that the sci-fi aspect is white racists from 150 years in the future travel back to supply the South w/ AK-47s to win the war...once again, making the secession of the South all about slavery... >:( >:( >:(

Pedro,

I just noticed this oldish post of yours. Can I ask if you've finished the Guns of the South? It's a great book (probably Turtledove's best in my opinion) and I can definitely state that if you do/did finish it you should see that  it makes quite the opposite point to the one you thought it was making at first.
I'm not an American, so I was always under the impression that your civil war was over slavery but I have to say that Turtledove's books have convinced me that it was a lot more complicated than that.
He's also written some interesting short stories set in an Eastern Roman Empire that never fell (Turtledove's actually a Byzantine historian), though the quality isn't as good. Basically, the premise is that there was no Islamic invasion because Muhammad converted to Orthodox Christianity. There was likewise no Great Schism, but merely some Germanic Christians who left the Church and are considered heretics. There are some mistakes in his treatment of Orthodoxy, but then he's more interested in the politics than religion.

James
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: jmbejdl on February 02, 2005, 08:29:19 AM
Hi,

I'm currently reading the Night's Dawn trilogy by Peter F. Hamilton again (that's the Reality Dysfunction, the Neutronium Alchemist, and the Naked God - I'm afraid my light reading tends to always be science fiction) and the Philokalia (the English translation) volume 1. When I've finished that I've got the next three to look forward to, so I'll probably be reading these for the foreseeable future.

James
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: idontlikenames on February 02, 2005, 11:53:50 AM
I'm reading "The Oxford History of the Church, Volume I: The Church in Ancient Society, from Galilee to Gregory the Great", by Henry Chadwick.

It's one of the newer Church histories available.  I'm not sure what Chadwick is (judging by the way he writes, he seems to be an Anglo-catholic), but he's very objective.

A Church History I do NOT recommend is "The History of the Christian Church" by Philip Schaff.  Schaff is an ultra-conservative Lutheran who is very un-objective and has an obvious pro-Protestant axe to grind.  He even reverts to name-calling: calling the Catholic Church "Romanists" and the Popes "pretentious".  It's absolutely awful.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. David on February 02, 2005, 05:08:40 PM
Can I ask if you've finished the Guns of the South? It's a great book (probably Turtledove's best in my opinion) and I can definitely state that if you do/did finish it you should see that it makes quite the opposite point to the one you thought it was making at first.  I'm not an American, so I was always under the impression that your civil war was over slavery but I have to say that Turtledove's books have convinced me that it was a lot more complicated than that.

Well, great!  Ruin the ending for me, why don't you!!  ;) ;D

Quote
He's also written some interesting short stories set in an Eastern Roman Empire that never fell (Turtledove's actually a Byzantine historian), though the quality isn't as good. Basically, the premise is that there was no Islamic invasion because Muhammad converted to Orthodox Christianity. There was likewise no Great Schism, but merely some Germanic Christians who left the Church and are considered heretics. There are some mistakes in his treatment of Orthodoxy, but then he's more interested in the politics than religion.

WOW!!!  That's cool!  Where could I find the short stories?

Marjorie: I LOVE the journals of Fr. Alexander.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: jmbejdl on February 03, 2005, 04:07:01 AM
Pedro,

I didn't think I'd said enough to spoil the ending of Guns of the South for you - just thought I'd let you know that it's not as simplistic as your first impressions suggested.

Anyway, the short stories are collected in a book called 'Agent of Byzantium'. I managed to get hold of a second hand copy, but I'm pretty sure you can get it through Amazon. It suffers from the usual horrendous Harry Turtledove cover art (Guns of the South is a notable exception to this) but I think you might find the stories interesting even if flawed. The thing that grated most to me when I read them was his portrayal of the Orthodox attitude to St. Gregory the Great and, as I said, the quality isn't as good as some of his other stuff (I think these were pretty early bits of Turtledove fiction).

Another series of his that I think you might like starts with a book called 'How Few Remain' and continues, so far, up to the fascist era. This is also based on the premise of the South winning the Civil War, but without the help of time travellers.

James
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ian Lazarus on February 03, 2005, 01:05:08 PM
Lessee.....


Orthodox Dogmatic Theology by Fr. Michael Pomazansky

Two Paths: Papal Monarchy and Conciliar Tradition by Michael Whelton

More Spirited Than Lions

Foxtrotus Maximus by Bill Amend

Penguin Dreams and Stranger Things by Berke Breathed

Dave Barry Turns 50 by Dave Barry


And incedentily Shultz, I'm a big fan of the Brother Cadfael Series on video. I'm giong to get the whole collection on DVD pretty soon, after I get the rest of the Black Adder!

Ian Lazarus :grommit:

Raised by a cup of coffee! :coffee:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BrotherAidan on February 03, 2005, 04:10:39 PM
The Ancestral Sin by Fr. John Romanides
Before Augustine and "original sin" the Fathers referred to the "ancestral sin"
This book is a look at that understanding of the earlier Greek Fathers and what the Orthodox Church believes regarding this. In the introduction alone Fr. John pretty well dismantles the Western view.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BrotherAidan on February 03, 2005, 04:16:56 PM
The Spirit of Early Chrisitan Thought: Seeking the Face of God, by Robert Louis Wilkin
For a review of this book see Touchstone - A Journal of Mere Christianity, April 2004.

Wilkin shows how the early Christian thinkers did not infect biblical, apostolic doctrine with geek philosophy (ala von Harnack) Rather they wrote, using the terms and categories of their own culture but in the process creating something completely new: a distinctly Christian wolrd view and way of thinking. Christianity, in other words infected the Greco-Roamn world.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BrotherAidan on February 03, 2005, 04:19:35 PM
Reflections on the Virgin Mary (Conciliar Press)
Philokalia : the Bible of Orthodox Spirituality (Light and Life)

and re-reading the book that lead me to Orthodoxy in the first place
At the Corner of East and Now, by Frederica Mathewes-Green
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BrotherAidan on February 03, 2005, 04:42:30 PM
i noticed Columcile is reading Wendell Berry
Berry's Life Is A Miracle is a wonderful read

in the Christian fantasy category the is The Shadowmancer. the author is new on the scene, an Anglican clergyman. Not up to C.S. Lewis or Charles Williams levels but not bad.

btw, Charles Williams books are becoming available again, The Place of the Lion is re-published by Regent College(in Vancouver) Press
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BrotherAidan on February 03, 2005, 04:51:34 PM
I noticed some history/Civil War interests on previous pages. If anyone wants a LOL read check out Confederates in the Attic by Tony Horowitz. It is a funny travelogue to various Civil War sites and the peole he meets, including re-eanctors, daughters of the Confederacy, etc.

One of the absolute best historical reads in American history is McCollough's biography, John Adams
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Matthew777 on February 06, 2005, 02:52:43 AM
A Table in the Presence. By reading the firsthand account of a Navy chaplain, I am starting to understand what we are really doing in Iraq for the first time.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Robert on February 06, 2005, 03:09:26 AM
The Wealth of Nations, by Adam Smith.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ibrahim on February 06, 2005, 10:18:12 AM
Asad: The Struggle for the Middle EAst by Partrick Seale; Peoples versus States: Minorities at Risk in the New Century by Ted Robert Gurr
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: J on February 06, 2005, 12:35:53 PM
The Sorrows of Empire (Johnson)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Protopsalti on February 06, 2005, 02:37:04 PM
About Marriage & Priesthood by St. John Chrisostom
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 06, 2005, 02:53:23 PM
A book I wish I would have read years ago! It's one of those books that make you want to grab ahold of the closest Orthodox brother and say "Why didn't you tell me about this!?" :)

The Non-Orthodox: The Orthodox Teaching on Christians Outside the Church (http://www.orthodoxinfo.com/inquirers/status.aspx), by Patrick Barnes
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Matthew777 on February 06, 2005, 03:03:18 PM
This is just a thread to ask what everyone is reading.

Is anyone reading any philosophy?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Robert on February 06, 2005, 04:32:04 PM
The Wealth of Nations is pretty good philosophy. I'm a big Adam Smith fan :)



Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 06, 2005, 05:35:33 PM
I got done re-reading The Method by Descartes a couple days ago. He has some interesting thoughts in the introduction (particularly about history, and the biases of someone who travels vs. someone who doesn't), but to be quite honest, I don't really see what other people seem to see in that type of philosophy. Personally, I can "get more" out of one page of the writings of the Desert Fathers than I can get from entire books by Plato, Nietzsche or Descartes. ???
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Matthew777 on February 06, 2005, 11:47:13 PM
The Wealth of Nations is pretty good philosophy. I'm a big Adam Smith fan :)
.

That book was a big influence on Darwin, you know. :D

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Matthew777 on February 06, 2005, 11:49:48 PM
I got done re-reading The Method by Descartes a couple days ago.

I love the jabs that Pascal takes at Descartes for attempting to prove the mystical with the analytical and reducing God's work to natural physics.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tallitot on February 07, 2005, 12:54:24 AM
Anybody have any good Lenten reading recommendations? I'm thinking of finding something by Fr. Alexander Schmemann.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Mor Ephrem on February 07, 2005, 08:52:31 AM
Just in case anyone has gotten the wrong idea in recent days, the Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church has NOT canonised Charles Darwin.  :P

Crucifer,

I've not read it, so I can't say for sure, but if you're looking for Lenten reading by Fr. Schmemann, I've heard good things about Great Lent.   
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on February 07, 2005, 01:52:34 PM
I just got done reading Harry Potter book 5 for the elevendy milionth time. ^-^

other than that, soem essays by Amy Tan, my Introducing the Orthodox Faith homework pages and Esthers Easter Dress: A Young Girls Adventure Through Holy Week so i can get some basics on the Orthodox Easter things coming up. its a childrens book, but i am finding they are a wealth of information for those who dont know or may need a refresher course!

I was reading through the older posts, and i highly recomend learning Latin..it is SO easy!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Pravoslavbob on February 18, 2005, 09:20:03 PM
Anybody have any good Lenten reading recommendations? I'm thinking of finding something by Fr. Alexander Schmemann.

Crucifer,

I have read "Great Lent" by Schmemann and I HIGHLY recommend it.  An amazing book.

Bob
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 18, 2005, 11:23:50 PM
Monks and Laymen in Byzantium: 843-1118, by Rosemary Morris
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: penelope on February 22, 2005, 09:45:51 AM
La femme et le salut du monde (Woman and the salvation of the world) by Paul Evdokimov, recommended to me by an older man who actually used to know Evdokimov personally.  I've only read the intro so far...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ania on February 22, 2005, 11:31:43 AM
Currently reading "Out of the Silent Planet" by C.S. Lewis.  Is a bit slow in the beginning, but picking up speed now.  Seems I'm going to have to hit up Amazon.com for "Perelandra" and "That Hideous Strength," (was lucky to find "Out of the Silent Planet" in the "$0.50 a book salvage bin" at my parents' local library). 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: MsGuided on February 22, 2005, 11:49:39 AM
Currently reading Pharmacotherapy: A Pathophysiologic Approach.  It's a lovely 2400+ page book, fifth edition of course...oh wait...you mean interesting books....eh sorry I got nothin...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on February 22, 2005, 02:50:21 PM
Quote
Currently reading "Out of the Silent Planet" by C.S. Lewis.  Is a bit slow in the beginning, but picking up speed now.  Seems I'm going to have to hit up Amazon.com for "Perelandra" and "That Hideous Strength," (was lucky to find "Out of the Silent Planet" in the "$0.50 a book salvage bin" at my parents' local library).

Oooh! i almost bought all 3 books at once w/ a Christmas gift card to B&N my bro gave me...decided instead to get more tolkien books lol...when ur done w/ the whole series, i'd be interested to hear what your thoughts are on em :)

as for what i am reading now: Rosa - The Life of an Italian Immigrant. it's for class, but it's actually quite good and entertaining :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Pravoslavbob on February 22, 2005, 06:40:24 PM
Currently reading Pharmacotherapy: A Pathophysiologic Approach. It's a lovely 2400+ page book, fifth edition of course...oh wait...you mean interesting books....

 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: !!!

Well, there must at least be aspects of it that are interesting.....
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: MsGuided on February 22, 2005, 06:47:05 PM
Yes of course...if anyone would like information on how to quit smoking, get rid of that nasty cold, treat their asthma, COPD, dyslipidemia or hypertension...then come on down and join the fun! ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Pravoslavbob on February 22, 2005, 06:56:05 PM
Well, there you go!  We heard it here first.   ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on February 23, 2005, 03:48:15 PM
Now of course I am reading Great Lent, and also the entire Sacrament of Confession service.  *sigh* I have so much work to do.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Bogoliubtsy on February 23, 2005, 03:50:34 PM
Red priests: renovationism, Russian Orthodoxy, and revolution. by Edward Roslof
and
The Age of Reason by Sartre.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: monkvasyl on February 24, 2005, 05:12:59 PM
My spiritual father gave me the best obedience, many years ago (I still follow it), read the entire service before I attend that service.  This is something ideal for all readers.  We tend to be too busy "doing" the service to actually find the time to attend and pray the service.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SouthSerb99 on February 27, 2005, 03:36:08 PM
In The Interest of Justice: Great Opening and Closing Arguments of the Last 100 years... by Joel J. Seidemann.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Hesychios on February 27, 2005, 03:43:43 PM
I have a nasty habit of keeping multiple books on the coffee table in various degrees of use. I  am trying to limit my reading to perhaps two at a time!

Currently I am finishing up MATTHEW'S Christian-Jewish Community by Anthony J. Salarini and I find it fabulous. I usually will read the Prologue of Ohrid for the day (if I can) and once in a while I will pick up my volume of the Collected Dialogues of Plato with the hope that I can get through a dialogue in a few days (usually when I am on vacation or have a long weekend).  I am hoping to read them all eventually, I have only finished five.

I started Dante's Divine Comedy, it's pretty deep and entertaining, it's in the queue for me to return to it when I finish the book about Matthew's Gospel.

This is all pretty hit-or-miss, I am not a very disciplined reader.

Michael
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BrotherAidan on April 12, 2005, 11:51:23 AM
Ania
You will like Perelandra and That Hideous Strength - both are better reads than Out of the Silent Planet - it sort of sets the table for the other two books; That Hideous Strength is one of the ten best books all time that I have read!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Veniamin on April 12, 2005, 12:16:16 PM
In The Interest of Justice: Great Opening and Closing Arguments of the Last 100 years... by Joel J. Seidemann.

I'll trade you my Property textbook for that one.  Property reading is not fun.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SouthSerb99 on April 12, 2005, 01:50:57 PM
I'll trade you my Property textbook for that one. Property reading is not fun.

No deal... and an argument can be made that your offer could be construed as "cruel and unusual". lol  ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Felipe Ortiz on April 12, 2005, 01:51:22 PM
Don Quixote- (struggling, but I will finish it... some day)

I hope you have already finished it, Ania!  :) It is indeed a hard reading (and much harder if you try to read it in Spanish), but it is marvellous... my favorite novel -- together with Swift's Gullivers' Travels.

I've not read it, so I can't say for sure, but if you're looking for Lenten reading by Fr. Schmemann, I've heard good things about Great Lent.

Yes, Fr. Alexander Schmemann's Great Lent is quite good.

I've just begun Hellenism, the History of a Civilization by Arnold J. Toynbee (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnold_J._Toynbee), a very interesting (and amazingly scholarly) historian of the first half of XX century. He seems to be somewhat forgotten nowadays; that's a pity. Toynbee was much more concerned with religion than the average historian. Though he was not an Orthodox Christian and many of his religious ideas were very far from Orthodoxy, his general approach and method can surely provide many insights to Orthodox Christians with a taste for history.

The first chapters of this book are great. The definition of Hellenism he presents in the first pages is: a civilization in which the city-state was the major cultural expression of the humanistic religious ideology. He defines humanism as an idolatrous (he indeed uses this word) worship of the man instead of God. And the goal of this book is to show the essential connection between the hellenic worship of man and the growth, the achievements, the collapse and the final fall of Hellenism.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Veniamin on April 12, 2005, 03:51:39 PM


No deal... and an argument can be made that your offer could be construed as "cruel and unusual". lol  ;)

Not if you had taken the deal.  No harm to one who consents, remember?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: idontlikenames on April 27, 2005, 08:11:26 AM
just got done reading "Synchronicity" by Carl Gustav Jung.....very enlightening......makes you wander about the "materialism" which has sweld sway over the neurosciences for the past century.....

For a long time, I doubted the existence of "souls" (even being Orthodox).....now I may start believing in them again......
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ania on April 27, 2005, 03:28:08 PM
 
Ania
You will like Perelandra and That Hideous Strength - both are better reads than Out of the Silent Planet - it sort of sets the table for the other two books; That Hideous Strength is one of the ten best books all time that I have read!



I gotta agree with you there on "That Hideous Strength."  I finished it last night (finally, never realized I was such a busy person until I tried finishing a book I really like).  It started out a bit slow but after the first 3 chapters I was hooked.  C.S. Lewis has a rather poetic quality to his writings, sometimes you can almost see a rhythm. 
Perelandra, the 2nd book, was a good read as well, and I highly recommend it. 
C.S. Lewis definitely makes you think on a more spiritual level, and his theological ideas are very sound. 

I also ordered "Father Arseny" from Amazon, but after reading some 30 pages, became rather tired of the poor translation.  I will try finishing it perhaps after Pascha, but I doubt I'll be finishing it very soon. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ania on April 27, 2005, 03:35:11 PM


I hope you have already finished it, Ania! :) It is indeed a hard reading (and much harder if you try to read it in Spanish), but it is marvellous... my favorite novel -- together with Swift's Gullivers' Travels.


I have not finished Don Quixote, unfortunately.  It is sitting on my bookshelf between Terry Pratchett's Discworld series (which I've read) and Dostoyevsky's "The Idiot," (which I started, but also put aside), with it's bookmark still in place from where I stopped reading last fall.  After Pascha it's one of the books that I'll take up again, at least for another few chapters.  I'm sure the read gets easier as you go along. 

I've developed the habit of forcing myself to read a chapter of a book that is "good for me" every day, before going on to read a book that I want to read  (which usually isn't any good at all).  This way I at least get something edifying.  :-)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Matthew777 on April 27, 2005, 10:43:34 PM
I am reading Jesus Before Christianity by Dominican Father Albert Nolan. I am almost half-way done and so far, this has been one of the best books on the person of Jesus that I have ever read. The message of Jesus on the Kingdom of God and how we are too build it is too often ignored. We become so fixated on Christ as an object of worship that we neglect His message that we must follow. This is not to say that we are not to worship the Son of God but He did say, "If you love me, follow my commandments". We cannot have right worship without right action.

May peace be upon thee and with thy spirit.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BrotherAidan on April 28, 2005, 02:14:41 PM
An equally compelling book, Matthew is The Message and the Kingdom. One must put aside the assumption the authors seem to take uncritically from liberal New Testatment scholars that Paul created a different religion from Jesus and also one must put aside the authors' agnosticism regarding the resurrection, but for a clear picture of the brutal, grinding, oppressive nature of the Roman Empire along with Paul's social teaching there are few better books.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SouthSerb99 on April 28, 2005, 02:24:29 PM
Just finished reading (back to back) "The Orthodox Church" by Bishop Kallistos Ware and "The Non-Orthodox: The Orthodox Teaching on Christians Outside of the Church" by Patrick Parnes.

What a difference of opinion in their treatment of the heterodox!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Elisha on April 28, 2005, 02:53:23 PM
Just finished reading (back to back) "The Orthodox Church" by Bishop Kallistos Ware and "The Non-Orthodox: The Orthodox Teaching on Christians Outside of the Church" by Patrick Parnes.

What a difference of opinion in their treatment of the heterodox!

Was that a newer edition of TOC?  I have yet to (finish) the comparison article on orthodoxinfo between the versions.  I have The Non Orthodox and think it is a great book, but also think TOC is great as well.  I read an early edition of The Orthodox Church.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Matthew777 on April 28, 2005, 03:14:32 PM
Has anyone read Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SouthSerb99 on April 28, 2005, 03:28:19 PM
Was that a newer edition of TOC? I have yet to (finish) the comparison article on orthodoxinfo between the versions. I have The Non Orthodox and think it is a great book, but also think TOC is great as well. I read an early edition of The Orthodox Church.

No, I believe I have the most recent edition...  I was unaware of the comparison article... yet another article to read!  ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on April 28, 2005, 04:07:58 PM
Collected Works: Volume 2; St. Francis, Everlasting Man, St. Thomas by G.K. Chesterton
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Doubting Thomas on April 28, 2005, 04:17:00 PM
Jesus and the Victory of God by N.T. Wright is what I'm currently reading. It's good, but it's rather lengthy being over 660 pages. It's a good answer to those "jesus seminar" types, but I've just ordered a bunch of books from Amazon.com (including For the Life of the World by Fr. Schmemann) so I might take a break from JVG.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Matthew777 on April 28, 2005, 04:21:40 PM
I believe I will finish The Way of a Pilgrim next. I read probably two books a week that are unrelated to school.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Matthew777 on April 28, 2005, 04:23:36 PM
Jesus and the Victory of God by N.T. Wright is what I'm currently reading. It's good, but it's rather lengthy being over 660 pages. It's a good answer to those "jesus seminar" types, but I've just ordered a bunch of books from Amazon.com (including For the Life of the World by Fr. Schmemann) so I might take a break from JVG.

Jesus Before Christianity, as I understand it, is sort of a middleground between the historicists and the Jesus Seminar types. Though I do not agree with some of the opinions of the author, his assessment of how Jesus perceived the Kingdom of God and the message of the Kingdom is thought-provoking.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on April 28, 2005, 04:27:07 PM
Heavy history...Giogorio Falco's The Holy Roman Republic


Got to understand where "they" came from too.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Elisha on April 28, 2005, 04:35:55 PM
Has anyone read Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future?

Yup, great book...and if you take it to heart, you should understand why we are preaching to you about speaking the Truth in love and all that jazz.  BUT, And this is a BIG But (no pun intended), remember that Fr. Seraphim is AN opinion and NOT NECESSARILLY the official Orthodox opinion.  But again, a great book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Keble on April 28, 2005, 05:07:27 PM
Jesus and the Victory of God by N.T. Wright is what I'm currently reading. It's good, but it's rather lengthy being over 660 pages. It's a good answer to those "jesus seminar" types, but I've just ordered a bunch of books from Amazon.com (including For the Life of the World by Fr. Schmemann) so I might take a break from JVG.

I'm been wanting to read some Wright, but perhaps I will start with something a little shorter.

I've just started My God: A reappraisal of normal religious experience by Martin Thornton. At the end of the preface it says "I have collaborated with nobody and discussed it with nobody. Nobody has even read the proofs and offered valuable suggestions."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Matthew777 on April 28, 2005, 05:55:40 PM
I am also reading Creation and Time by Dr. Hugh Ross. Good stuff.  O0
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Doubting Thomas on April 28, 2005, 09:53:28 PM
Quote
I'm been wanting to read some Wright, but perhaps I will start with something a little shorter.
The first book in the series, The New Testament and the People of God was a little shorter, not quite 500 pages. It sets the historical background for the rest of the series. (The third is The Revelation of the Son of God.) I believe he does have some shorter books which I may read some day for review/summary. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Matthew777 on April 30, 2005, 07:32:01 PM
I am thinking about reading the Brothers Karamazov but perhaps it is a little too long for me to read right now. On the other hand, I read non-school-related books all the time. Perhaps I will check it out the the library today.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jakub on April 30, 2005, 08:44:18 PM
Reading Athanasius, The Life of Antony & the Letter to Marcellinus.

james
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on May 07, 2005, 11:11:41 PM
Normally I'm not much into comparitive religion (I have enough trouble learning enough about my own religion--there are so many good books out there), but I saw Encyclopedia of the World's Religions by R.C. Zaehner on the bargain table at Barnes and Noble today, so I bought it. If there was any hope that this book might be something a bit more conservative, that hope was dashed on the very first page of text, where I was informed that (supposedly) the idea that one religion is the true religion isn't believed by any "reputable theologian" anymore.* Leafing through the sections on Zoroastrianism and others, I could see that it doesn't get much better. In any event, I'll plow through it anyway. :)

I also bought a Journal today called Modern Age which seems to be an epistemological/educational publication... has anyone read this before, and if so would you mind sharing what you thought of it?


* To quote the book: "Selection, of course, is not considered to be arbitrary by those who deny that religions grow and change in major respects, and who maintain that the one true religion (ie. the one which the writer happens to subscribe to) sprang ready-made from God as Pallas from Zeus. But this view is no longer held by any reputable theologian, let alone by critical scholars." (p. 3)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: irene on June 06, 2005, 04:43:39 PM


 "Faith for a Lifetime" by Archbishop Iakovos!


Being fairly new to Orthodoxy, I didn't know who he was, but started the book, and couldn't put it down.   

Now, he is very close to my heart.   He writes as though he is speaking directly to you as a friend.

Now, I miss him as much as Pope John Paul II!   
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ExOrienteLux on June 08, 2005, 02:24:23 PM
Rereading That Hideous Strength, then probably one of the multitude of books my girlfriend got for me, probably Les Miserables.

-Philip.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: idontlikenames on June 08, 2005, 02:25:53 PM
reading "Sophia" by Fr. Sergei Bulgakov....very enlightening
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: jlerms on June 08, 2005, 02:49:53 PM
I just finished reading St. Theophan the Recluse "The Spiritual Life and How to be Attuned to it " and
George S. Gabriel's Mary the Untrodden Portal of God.  Both were excellent.
I am currently re-reading Doestoevsy's Brothers Karamazov along with The Arena by Bishop Ignatius Brianchaninov, St. John Chrysostom's sermons on Wealth and Poverty and of course the New Testament

God bless you all,   Juliana
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Philokalia on June 08, 2005, 05:13:22 PM
I am reading "And Quiet Flows the Don" by Mikhail Sholokhov. Re-reading I should say since I vaguely recall reading it about quarter of a century ago.

I'm also re-reading The Explanation by the Blessed Theophylact of the Holy Gospel according to St Matthew
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Matthew777 on June 09, 2005, 07:14:08 AM
I have postponed my reading of A Way of the Pilgrim and The First-Created Man until school ends but currently, I am reading a chapter a day of the book of Exodus.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: coptic orthodox boy on June 09, 2005, 01:22:40 PM
IC XC NIKA
Gospel of John, St. Ephrem's "Hymns on Paradise", "Jesus in Egypt"
copticorthodoxboy
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Sir Sundae on June 11, 2005, 01:31:33 PM
The Way of the Pilgrim and the Pilgrim Continues His Way, The Problem of Pain by C.S. Lewis, The Lord of the Rings Trilogy and the Silmarillion, The New Testament and the People of God by N.T. Wright, On the Eight Vices by St. John Cassian, On the Incarnation by St. Athanasius, He is there and He is Not Silent by Francis Schaeffer, and After Virtue by Alasdair MacIntyre.

That's my summer reading.


--Chuck
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on June 11, 2005, 02:48:02 PM
Chuck - i like a lot of your summer reading! :)

lessee, i am currently reading...essays by Emerson for my American Lit class, the letters of J.R.R. Tolkien (a few per night), The Church of the Ancient Councils by Archbishop Peter L'Huillier, and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (in my rereading of the series in anticipation of the 6th book coming out in july). ;D summer is a happy time, since i have time to do my own reading again.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Felipe Ortiz on June 11, 2005, 03:50:11 PM
Just begun J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: idontlikenames on June 11, 2005, 07:00:43 PM
plugging my way thru Fr. Seraphim Rose's "Soul After Death".....
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. David on June 12, 2005, 07:49:04 PM
Metr. ANTHONY (Bloom)'s Beginning to Pray (again)
Desire of the Everlasting Hills by Thomas Cahill
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Sir Sundae on June 13, 2005, 11:15:03 PM
i see we have a number of Tolkien fans on the forum.  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: sin_vladimirov on June 14, 2005, 12:19:23 AM
To Romans
 ch. IX

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tikhon29605 on June 14, 2005, 04:23:19 AM
plugging my way thru Fr. Seraphim Rose's "Soul After Death".....


Try not to let it scare you.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ExOrienteLux on June 15, 2005, 10:55:27 AM
Quote
The Way of the Pilgrim and the Pilgrim Continues His Way, The Problem of Pain by C.S. Lewis, The Lord of the Rings Trilogy and The Silmarillion, The New Testament and the People of God by N.T. Wright, On the Eight Vices by St. John Cassian, On the Incarnation by St. Athanasius, He is there and He is Not Silent by Francis Schaeffer, and After Virtue by Alasdair MacIntyre.

So that's where my library has been disappearing to!  Give those back! :)

Anyway, I'm rereading The Way of a Pilgrim and The Pilgrim Continues His Way, and then it's probably St. Ephraim's Hymns on Paradise, followed by St. Theophan the Recluse's Turning the Heart to God (it's an excerpt from The Way of Salvation).  Should keep me busy for the rest of the summer.

-Philip.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Doubting Thomas on June 15, 2005, 02:07:32 PM
Common Ground by Jordan Bajis and (still wading my way through) Jesus and the Victory of God by NT Wright.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: beewolf on June 15, 2005, 11:21:33 PM
I am reading Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov (bedtime reading), Cassian's Institutes, and Simon Chan's 'Spiritual Theology'.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Cephas on June 16, 2005, 12:29:35 AM
â€Â  Irini nem ehmot â€Â

I'm new to this site, but i've heard quite a bit about it.  I figured that this would probably be the best place to put my first post  ;D.

As of right now, i'm actually re-reading J.N.D. Kelley's book Early Christian Doctrines.  It is really good, but i think i may have gotten in over my head. lol.  I was looking for an introductory book on Patristics and a friend of mine has suggested this one.  If any of you know of any other, feel free to let me know.

Pray for me.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ephraim on June 16, 2005, 08:18:04 PM
I'm reading the Old Testament:  Paul Nadim Tarazi's Introduction to the Old Testament, Walter Brueggemann's Introduction to the Old Testament, and a couple of different translations of the Old Testament (NRSV, Fox' Five Books of Moses).  I'll add in other things as I work my way through it.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Doubting Thomas on June 17, 2005, 01:38:05 PM

As of right now, i'm actually re-reading J.N.D. Kelley's book Early Christian Doctrines.ÂÂ  It is really good, but i think i may have gotten in over my head. lol.ÂÂ  
That is a good book.  I've recently re-read several chapters in that book regarding the development of Trinitarian dogma and Christology.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on June 24, 2005, 02:47:22 PM
Harry Potter 5, again...boning upfor the release of #6!

though actually i need to find some spiritual reading, I've ben feeling out of whack as day to day life has been overshadowing what good my spiritual life has been doing...i have as yet to get the two totally in synch.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on June 24, 2005, 03:27:38 PM
Quote
Harry Potter 5, again...boning upfor the release of #6!

AW YEA! i just finished that a few nights ago, lost sleep because of it ;D spent the last month doing my rereading of the whole series in anticipation of #6...i....can't....wait :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on June 24, 2005, 03:28:13 PM
now im reading the Princess Bride for the 1st time (and i've never seen the movie either - plan to soon tho)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. David on June 27, 2005, 12:29:58 AM
Fatherhood: An Anthology, Edited by John Lewis-Stempel
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SeanMc on June 27, 2005, 12:37:29 AM
The Annals of Imperial Rome, by Gaius Tacitus.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on June 27, 2005, 10:06:59 AM
now im reading the Princess Bride for the 1st time (and i've never seen the movie either - plan to soon tho)

INCONCEIVABLE!!

 :D :D :D

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ania on June 27, 2005, 10:07:40 AM
Impatiently awaiting Amazon to send me "Resteraunt at the End of the Universe."  Pre-ordered Harry Potter 6, should be getting it the day it comes out (I hope anyway).  Haven't decided yet what my next religion-related book might be, though "Sword of the Prophet" (I think it's called) was highly recommended to me again a few days ago.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Keble on June 27, 2005, 10:19:17 AM
Fatherhood: An Anthology, Edited by John Lewis-Stempel

Pedro, you might be interested in this: Two of Us : The Story of a Father, a Son, and the Beatles (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0618251456/104-3777559-0682302?v=glance) by Peter Smith. I just read it and found it really interesting.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on June 27, 2005, 12:45:10 PM
INCONCEIVABLE!!

 :D :D :D

Ebor

yes, i know, i know :) i get that from everyone who knows me and hears i havent read and/or seen Princess Bride...well, im almost done w/ the book, and soon after will be viewing the movie - will report back w/ my findings, even if you (Ebor) are the only one interested ;)

Donna Mary
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ania on June 27, 2005, 04:26:21 PM
Princess Bride is awesome... whenever we hear that someone hasn't seen it, we try to correct the situation as quickly as possible.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Girl on June 28, 2005, 12:03:35 AM
Currently....Jane Austen's Emma

After this I think I am going to go back to my favorite book of all time by Orson Scott Card...... Xenocide
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TomS on June 28, 2005, 12:05:07 PM
The Orthodox Corruption of Scripture: The Effect of Early Christological Controversies on the Text of the New Testament
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0195102797/ref=pd_luc_21_lc_ax40_r1c2_a2_t/103-8147243-5626225?v=glance&s=books

Lost Christianities: The Battle for Scripture and the Faiths We Never Knew
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0195141830/ref=pd_ys_pym_all_8/103-8147243-5626225?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: jmell on June 28, 2005, 01:23:11 PM
The Orthodox Corruption of Scripture: The Effect of Early Christological Controversies on the Text of the New Testament
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0195102797/ref=pd_luc_21_lc_ax40_r1c2_a2_t/103-8147243-5626225?v=glance&s=books

Lost Christianities: The Battle for Scripture and the Faiths We Never Knew
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0195141830/ref=pd_ys_pym_all_8/103-8147243-5626225?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance



I'm listened to the Lost Christianities Lecture, Right this second I'm listening to his commentery of the New Testament. It's in the Teaching Company series of lectures.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TomS on June 28, 2005, 02:27:11 PM

I'm listened to the Lost Christianities Lecture, Right this second I'm listening to his commentery of the New Testament. It's in the Teaching Company series of lectures.

Interesting, no?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: jmell on June 28, 2005, 02:34:42 PM
Interesting, no?

Very Interesting, his specialty is textual criticism and he goes into detail about the original manuscripts of the NT and how they were changed either by accident or to fit agendas. He also goes into the Epistles that have questionable authorship. (I can't remember which ones, but I remember him saying that most scholars are pretty sure Ephesians wasn't written by Paul). That the Gospel of John and Revelations are written by different people, and that some people think that The Acts of the Apostle was patched up from different sources. Also he points out the inconsistencies in the Epistles verses the Gospels and Acts and how this was due to people changing things.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on June 29, 2005, 07:51:11 PM
The Fourth Crusade and the Sack of Constantinople, by Jonathan Phillips
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Doubting Thomas on June 30, 2005, 12:07:25 PM
Very Interesting, his specialty is textual criticism and he goes into detail about the original manuscripts of the NT and how they were changed either by accident or to fit agendas. He also goes into the Epistles that have questionable authorship. (I can't remember which ones, but I remember him saying that most scholars are pretty sure Ephesians wasn't written by Paul). That the Gospel of John and Revelations are written by different people, and that some people think that The Acts of the Apostle was patched up from different sources. Also he points out the inconsistencies in the Epistles verses the Gospels and Acts and how this was due to people changing things.
I guess that all depends on what "scholars" you listen to.  ::)

Speaking of "agendas", it's perhaps more likely that the theories which suggest "political" tampering with the documents are themselves products of modernist/relativist agendas to reinvent "Christianity" in order to make it more pallitable for today's pluralistic society.  That way no one has to accountable to anything other than a "Christianity" of one's own imagination.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on June 30, 2005, 01:16:02 PM
Well said.

And this is definately an area where we Orthodox could step it up in defense of our faith. There is some material out there, but I don't think that there is enough. Works like John Breck's book Scripture and Tradition: The Bible and its Interpretation in the Orthodox Church, for example, which attempts to demonstrate that the Gospel of John was all written by a single author, among other things, just doesn't come up on the radar of most people. It doesn't have the buzz of being an apologetic book, and it's given no marketing push (not that we push ANY book except those by a few select authors) so it isn't as widely read as it could be. Actually, I find Breck's use of the Chiasmus (his main argument) unconvincing, but that's the whole point: there should be a larger debate going on here within Orthodox and Orthodox/Other Christian contexts, not just a book or two published every few years which tries to dispute the volumous output of liberal scholars.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ian Lazarus on July 01, 2005, 03:32:53 PM
"The Eucharist" by Alexander Schemmann
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on July 05, 2005, 06:18:50 AM
Though I had to work yesterday (blah) I did make it to Barnes and Noble about 10 minutes before they closed. I did a quick browse of the religion section and was suprised to see John Noonan's name pop out at me. Apparently he has a new book out, titled A Church That Can and Cannot Change: The Development of Catholic Moral Teaching. It goes over how moral beliefs have changed in the Catholic Church, focusing mainly on slavery, but also going into usury, divorce, and a couple other issues. To be quite honest I wasn't sure that I wanted to get it (I know from his book on Contraception that he is a bit too liberal for my own tastes; not to mention dry reading at times), but a blurb by Jaroslav Pelikan on the back cover praising the book pushed my curiosity far enough to buy it. That might have been the first time that a commendation on the back cover got me to buy a book. Anyway, I'll be starting it today after I finish Family Matters: Why Homeschooling Makes Sense by David Guterson, a philosophical book on homeschooling written by a somewhat liberal ("progressive") libertarian.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: sin_vladimirov on July 05, 2005, 07:26:13 AM
Hebrews capter VI... and what a read is. (first time I am reading the NT with Patristic Commentary from OSB and ONT). It is so amazing. I never could've even imagined what one can find reading the NT through the "eyes of the fathers". I just love it. It is like a really really cool tv series. You can never wait for a new episode (chapter). It is so great.... Ah, well... back to Hebrews.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Doubting Thomas on July 05, 2005, 01:11:45 PM
What Saint Paul Really Said, by NT Wright.  I'll review it when I'm done.  It seems to give refreshingly accurate, but rather UnReformed view on Pauline thought.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Sir Sundae on July 05, 2005, 02:28:29 PM
What Saint Paul Really Said, by NT Wright. I'll review it when I'm done. It seems to give refreshingly accurate, but rather UnReformed view on Pauline thought.
I'll be looking forward to your review! It's on my list for this summer.

Also, the view Wright takes on Paul is causing a bit of controversy within the Reformed Protestant community. Coined "the New Perspective on Paul," it challenges traditional Reformed beliefs about the nature of righteousness, justification and of the Church. It's pretty easy to see, then, why it would cause stir within protestantism.

--Chuck
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on July 18, 2005, 08:03:57 PM
Sex and Society in the World of the Orthodox Slavs, 900-1700 by Eve Levin. Much like Noonan's book on Contraception, this one seems to be often-quoted and little-read by Catholic apologists.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Cephas on July 18, 2005, 10:28:58 PM
Gonna start reading History of Eastern Christianity by Aziz S. Atiya.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Keble on July 19, 2005, 10:06:10 AM
What Saint Paul Really Said, by NT Wright.ÂÂ  I'll review it when I'm done.ÂÂ  It seems to give refreshingly accurate, but rather UnReformed view on Pauline thought.

I'm reading this, but for a very tiny little book, I'm finding it slow going (hard, not dull).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ania on July 19, 2005, 11:32:48 AM
Finally starting on Harry Potter 6... :-D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on July 19, 2005, 12:32:47 PM
Finally starting on Harry Potter 6... :-D

aww yea :) let us know when you finish in the rather slow HP VI thread :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ania on July 19, 2005, 02:06:21 PM
I didn't know there was a HP VI thread...  I can't find it... ???
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on July 19, 2005, 09:10:05 PM
A couple of threads down in this section.  Keble started it.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: coptic orthodox boy on July 26, 2005, 01:11:03 PM
IC XC NIKA
The Acts of the Apostles, St John Chrysostom's "On Wealth and Poverty" and James Clavell's "Shogun."
in Christ,
shawn
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: irene on September 26, 2005, 10:37:42 AM
Last eve I purchased, "The Apostles' Creed" by William Barclay.

Has anyone read this book, or have  any comments about the author?

Irene
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: orth_christian2000 on September 26, 2005, 03:09:52 PM
Last night, I began to read Rene Francois Guettee's "The Papacy".  He was a 19th century Roman Catholic priest, (for those who haven't heard of him).  I actually saw the book recommended here on the forum....Has anyone read it, would love to hear your input.  Mind you, I'm only on the first 10 pages.

In Christ, the least,
Theodore (Ted)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aserb on September 26, 2005, 03:40:57 PM
Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church together with a Protestant friend of mine who is a theology major and professor and Orthodox inquirer.  Please pray for him.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on September 26, 2005, 05:54:28 PM
Robinson Crusoe
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Innocent on September 26, 2005, 08:24:20 PM
I just purchased a biography on St. Elizabeth Feodorovna so I will be starting this.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Philokalia on September 27, 2005, 07:40:48 AM
The Little World of Don Camillo by Giovanni Guareschi about a Catholic Priest and a Communist Mayor in small town Italy.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EkhristosAnesti on September 27, 2005, 07:58:00 AM
1)   Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture, New Testament, Volume II, The Gospel of Mark (I’ve been on this book for about 5 thousand years, it should take me another 2 thousand before my lazy rear completes it).
2)   Fr. V.C. Samuel, Chalcedon Re-examined (been on this one for approximately 7.5 thousand years, and it may take me just that much more to finish it — again, pure laziness)
3)   Croft, Essential Criminal Law (May I get through it alive Christ-willing; Kyrie Eleison)

Peace.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Intrigued Latin on September 28, 2005, 01:06:25 PM
Just finished In the Vineyard of the Lord : The Life, Faith, and Teachings of Joseph Ratzinger, Pope Benedict XVI.

a great and easy read.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on September 28, 2005, 03:57:01 PM
Robinson Crusoe

According to the most recent National Geographic, they've found the remains of Alexander Selkirk's (the real "Robinson Crusoe) house. Here's an article about it from "The Scotsman"
http://news.scotsman.com/scotland.cfm?id=1975692005

Ebor (who is reading "Murder in Millenium VI", Margery Kemp/Calvin/Bunyan for a Survey of British Lit course, "Japanese Festivals" "The Hamster History of Britain" (a sort of picture book that adults can enjoy too) and several other books depending on where I am.  :D )
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Stamfordguy on September 28, 2005, 08:41:56 PM
Just completed: Tsar - The Lost World of Nicholas and Alexandra by Peter Kurth. It certainly presented the Romanovs in a very unflattering light but that was not surprising to me having read many books on the subject. This one was very well researched and beautifully illustrated with archival photographs.

Currently: Mother Angelica by Raymond Arroyo. I've only started but it promises to be a great read. She single-handedly built the largest religious media/broadcasting center in the world and did it in spite of tremendous opposition from cardinals, bishops and dishonest businessmen.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Silouan on September 28, 2005, 08:55:10 PM
Today I started reading Christ the Eternal Tao which thus far is very interesting.  It is a good example of how Orthodoxy doesn't seek to destroy a culture, but to grow from what is good within a culture.  And of course I probably should have read this awhile ago considering my avatar here!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Elisha on September 28, 2005, 09:25:07 PM
Today I started reading Christ the Eternal Tao which thus far is very interesting.  It is a good example of how Orthodoxy doesn't seek to destroy a culture, but to grow from what is good within a culture.  And of course I probably should have read this awhile ago considering my avatar here!

I'd read it if there was a Reader's Digest condensed version.  I've heard it is overly verbose, but nonetheless an excellent book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Silouan on September 29, 2005, 01:04:36 PM
Quote
I'd read it if there was a Reader's Digest condensed version.  I've heard it is overly verbose, but nonetheless an excellent book.

It has been especially interesting to me as I have been working on learning some Chinese for awhile now (yeah I know I have wierd hobbies).  The problem of being overly verbose seems to be part of almost every book published by Saint Herman's.  I love their books but some of them (especially the later Optina Elders) are packed with relatively useless information (But that is partly because they are translations of Russian works, and as even a quick glance at Russian literature shows they like to overdo everything).  I think the book is wonderful though in showing how true missionary work ought to be carried out.  That Orthodoxy need not impose a foriegn culture upon mission subjects and can built upon the high points of any culture.  Such ideals would be very important if the Orthodox were to conduct any serious missionary work among the Navajos, for instance (but that's the topic for another thread). 

One thing I especially like in the book are the Chinese icons depicting events from the life of Christ.  Christ and the apostles are all depicted as Chinese and the artwork is in a definite Chinese style (I'm not nearly as conservative as some people think I am!).  The book is quite excelent because it forces one to see Christianity outside of a European context and with a completely different philosophical base - and hence indirectly highlights the danger of tieing Orthodoxy too deeply to any one culture.   
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tallitot on September 29, 2005, 01:34:11 PM
The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice
a different view of a well-known "sacred cow".
http://www.versobooks.com/books/ghij/h-titles/hitchens_mother_teresa.shtml
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Silouan on September 29, 2005, 05:39:34 PM
Quote
The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice

That title is rather disturbing... and I doubt any publisher is so naive as to miss the double meaning. 

It's an interesting read, but it is tainted too much by the author's reliance on guilt by association and his secularist axe he is grinding.  Still it makes some good points I think about the media's coverage of Mother Theresa. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tallitot on September 29, 2005, 05:46:15 PM
Yeah the title has kept it out of many libraries. The author wanted to title it "Sacred Cow", but his editors overuled him. He also produced a documentary on the same subject titled "Hell's Angel", which has aired in the UK but not in the US.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Silouan on September 29, 2005, 05:51:22 PM
That is too bad the author has to be so polemical.  His message would be much more widely recieved if he could tone it down a bit.  But I must confess I did laugh the first time I saw that title... you never know what strange titles you'll find at a used book store. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on September 29, 2005, 09:25:38 PM
Cool! Thanks Ebor. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: MaryCecilia on October 01, 2005, 12:45:28 AM
I just finished a Star Trek Deep Space Nine novel and am beginning (again) a book called Not of This World (about Fr. Seraphim Rose) I had started to read it before I had our baby girl but then things got 'crazy' and I forgot about reading it for a while. I've decided to start reading it again, from the beginning since I can't remember where I left off last.  I am also in the middle of a collection of Sherlock Holmes stories.  These are both pretty good books.  :)

Mary
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on October 08, 2005, 12:03:49 PM
Intelligent Design Creationism and Its Critics: Philosophical, Theological, and Scientific Perspectives, ed. by Robert T Pennock. The first essay in this book is the worst work I have ever read. On any subject. It was written by someone with a PhD in philosophy, and it makes you realise exactly how bankrupt the Darwinian philosophy is.

EDIT--Let me rephrase the last sentence. I had spent nearly 40 minutes writing a mini-critique of this book, which I was going to post as a seperate thread, but then I noticed that I was going to be late for work, and I got tired of the whole thing, so I just erased it and posted a comment quickly on this thread. The last sentence would have been better though had I said: It was written by someone with a PhD in philosophy, and it makes you realise who intellectually bankrupt even the most educated among the Darwinist camp can be at times. Certainly most Darwinists are far better educated and intelligent than me, I didn't mean to imply that they were all idiots and I was the smart one. I was just frustrated that such a biased, contradictory, nonsensical piece could not only get published, but would be the very first essay and would set the tone for the entire book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on October 10, 2005, 01:43:48 PM
A Woman Of Substance..Barbara Taylor Bradford.  It's an old standby for mewhen i dont want to have to think while i am reading.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Krysostomos on October 18, 2005, 07:22:22 AM
I`m just goin to start "The difference of the nature philosophy of Demoktiros and Epikuros" by Karl Marx - a work, that made him the doctor in philosophy.
The book is just published in the Finnish language: Demokriitoksen ja Epikuroksen luonnonfilosofian ero. Better late than never...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on October 21, 2005, 08:55:49 AM
I just got a Harry Turtledove alternate history from the library:  "Ruled Britannia"  The premise is "What if the Spanish Armada had succeeded?"  It has Elizabeth I a prisoner in the tower for 10 years, Phillip of Spain's daughter Isabella ruling England with her husband Albert of Austria, and William Shakespeare as the main character.

Turtledove does excellent alternate history.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Timos on October 21, 2005, 01:14:41 PM
I'm working on "Counsels from the Holy Mountain" by Elder Ephraim...its like reading the Bible...its so huge. However, its good in that it is a series of letters from E. Ephraim to his (anonyumous) spiritual children (published with consent I'm sure) and  so its divided into sections relating to subject such as prayer, ilnesses, passions...etc. It can be a hard read and theres an "orthodox dictionary of terms" such as "isichia=quietude, panagia= all holy, gr. term used to venerate the Theotokos....etc.

Its good...but takes forever to finish unless u got loads of time on your hands or are reading it for school.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: suzannes on October 21, 2005, 07:46:32 PM
Devils, or The Posessed by Dostoevsky.  This is a new translation, not Constance Garnett.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Shankar on October 21, 2005, 08:00:00 PM
Is it by any chance, the translation of Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky?

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Silouan on October 21, 2005, 08:24:07 PM
Counsels from the Holy Mountain is good.  I enjoyed that along with Monastic Wisdon which is a collection of Elder Joseph's letters.  Elder Joseph of Vatopaidi also has some similar books that very good but I think only one is out in English. ÂÂ

Right now I'm readying Way to Nicaea by Fr. John Behr which is very good.  It is taking forever though since I am also reading primary sources to go along with it.  But the end result will be good as his book gives the reader a solid patristic grounding.  His approach that patristics is mainly about the question "Who do you say I am?" makes the reader think a little outside the box. ÂÂ

Am re-reading Christ the Eternal Tao - I just love this book.  Pages 200-300 give the best short expanation of Christianity that I have ever read.  It is written towards either the secularist or non Christian - but really helped me, a struggling Orthodox Christian to better understand my own faith.  Too much matieral put out by Orthodoxy is aimed at winning converts from the RCC or Protestantism over technicalities - this rises far above that. ÂÂ

Also just finished The Science of God which an athiest slowly turning theist neighbor of mine read and wanted me to read so we could discuss it.  I think the whole premise of the book was off and had some very arbitrary arguments based on science - so in 30 years most of the science he uses to justify his view will have changed.  Also it simply has no deep theological understanding of Genesis, at all.  While Creationism is important to Genesis it is only part.  The deeper part of man falling and needing a saviour - plus the revelation of the Trinity even in the early chapters of Genesis aren't mentioned.  Still if it helped a struggling atheist/agnostic get a little firmer faith in theism then it isn't all bad.   ÃƒÆ’‚Â
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: suzannes on October 22, 2005, 07:51:16 PM
Oh, this translation in by Michael R. Katz, put out by Oxford University Press.  Translations of Dostoevsky always seem to be...problematic.  I think there's a great deal of irony, and even humour that is lost.  I'd love an opinion from someome who has read Dostoevsky in the origional Russian.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on October 23, 2005, 06:54:44 PM
That's why I rather wish that I could read Japanese for my studies in that culture, Suzannes.  Even with good translators, how much is missed.

For my college class we've just read Marlowe's "Dr. Faustus" and 2 of John Donne's poems. 

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on October 23, 2005, 07:16:38 PM
right now:

daily readings from the desert fathers

On God and Man, theological poetry by St. Gregory the Theologian

finally embarking on a long-overdue rereading of the Lord of the Rings

and, Inkspell by Cornelia Funke, a German young adult writer along the fantasy vein - this is the sequal to the book Inkheart...both are wonderful, I recommend them for anyone w/ similar reading tastes to mine (I lean towards fantasy and/or children's-young adult literature as my reading of choice).

Ebor - although I loved my English major days which ended fairly recently, I don't envy you your Marlowe and Donne, because I was never left w/ any time to read my kiddie fantasy books - now that's all I do. Blessed freedom from school! :) someday I'm sure I'll hear my brick-sized Norton Anthologies of Literature calling to me to read the canonical stuff again, and they are on my book shelf waiting for just such a time, but for now I doubt it'll happen any time soon :)

D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on October 23, 2005, 07:34:09 PM
Norton Anthologies as "brick sized"?  Not "cinder block"?   ;D  An advantage to them is that they have such a selection of great works all in one volume for easy of reading again. 

This course is a bit of a "easy one" for me I suppose as I've read a good number of the things we're studying years ago; it isn't all new to me.  I've actually read "Faustus" aloud in a group that met to read plays and was Mephistophiles.  We got into the ending in a big way and the guy reading Faustus got dragged off a short way.  (When we were working our way through Shakespeare we voted to NOT do "Titus Andronicus".)  and I've seen the movie that Richard Burton made.  Then again, I'm only taking one course to start out, so I am able to have other reading too.  ;)

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: suzannes on October 23, 2005, 09:56:54 PM
I so so LOVE Marlowe's Faust!  I've never read Goethe's, and I know I should, but I Marlowe's is SO great!!

"He who loves pleasure for pleasure must burn."

"Cut is the branch that might have grown full straight."

If you liked Dr. Faustus, Webster's The Duchess of Malfi is also really good.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on October 24, 2005, 01:45:41 PM
Christopher Marlowe had a great talent for putting words together, didn't he?

I've never read all of Goethe either.

Have you read any of Marlowe's other work?

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: suzannes on October 24, 2005, 08:14:14 PM
I'd like to read Tamburlaine, and also The Jew of Malta.  I've got to get around to it, one of these days.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on October 26, 2005, 06:10:09 PM
To pack such talent and writing that survived into such a short life.

For something *completely* different, we just read the children a couple portions of "The Cyberiad" by Stanislaw Lem: "Trurl's Electronic Bard" the section about the Steelypips and most of the early part where an incredibly stupid and stubbon computer is built.  Part of the gift is Lem's and part is the genius of the translator from Polish to English, Michael Kandel.  In the "Bard" one of the poems that the machine composes a poem about a haircut with all the words beginning with "S".  it's about Samson.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on November 07, 2005, 05:30:00 PM
Last week it was large portions of "Paradise Lost" by Milton.  This week (among other things) it's "Oroonoko" by Aphra Behn.  Considered by some to be the first English novel.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on November 08, 2005, 01:08:20 PM
Ebor,

Oroonoko....that's the one that is structured largely like a romance right? between an African princess and prince, iirc? i read it 2 summers ago i think...there was something troubling about the ending though, i cant clearly recall what. sparked lots of discussion in class. let me know your thoughts on it when you finish?

right now for me: yet another reread of the HP series (on Chamber of Secrets currently), planning to have Goblet of Fire read by Nov. 18 in time for the movie (but will still reread Order of the Pheonix and HBP to get all that detail better instilled in my memory bank for future reference)...and still plugging my way through LOTR - and enjoying it more than i think i did last time i read it, which is always a treat. it helps that i havent seen the films in a while - they are brilliant, but there are some details that dont match with the descriptions of Tolkien as i interpret them, the most important being the whole physique of Frodo (age and build)...so it's nice to reread w/ the films not as strong in my mind as they have been in the past.

D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: observer on November 08, 2005, 10:30:47 PM
I am reading Living Theology by Pokrov Press.  It is interesting to read about lives of ascetics during Communism - rather dampens the anti MP opponents.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on December 29, 2005, 02:16:07 PM
I'm set to start reading Radical Monotheism and Western Culture (With Supplementary Essays), by H. Richard Niebuhr. I very much enjoyed it the first time I read it, but that was over 5 years ago, and a lot has happend during that time. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on December 29, 2005, 03:57:35 PM
Ebor,

Oroonoko....that's the one that is structured largely like a romance right? between an African princess and prince, iirc? i read it 2 summers ago i think...there was something troubling about the ending though, i cant clearly recall what. sparked lots of discussion in class. let me know your thoughts on it when you finish?

My apologies for not getting back here in a while.  Yes, "Oroonoko" by Aphra Behn is part romance, part social commentary on both slavery and life in what is now called Suriname, part travelogue.  It all ends in tragedy: Imoinda and Oroonoko try to run away so their child is not born into slavery, but in the end Oroonoko kills her, is recaptured, and tortured/dismembered until he dies.  It lead to some lively discussion in my class as well about slavery, the fact that Oroonoko took others as slaves and sold them when he was a prince, "Is Behn decrying slavery?" and more.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on December 30, 2005, 11:05:45 AM
Just finished "Eragon" and loved it...have to get my hands on book 2 now.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ania on December 30, 2005, 11:06:57 AM
For research reading, currently eating up "On the Beaten Path, an Appalachian Pilgrimage," by Robert Rubin, and any other books I can find on the Appalachian Trail (planning to hike at least part of it come May). 
For entertainment purposes, reading "American Gods" by Neil Gaiman.
For spiritual enrichment "The Orthodox Church," Timothy Ware.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. George on December 30, 2005, 11:07:47 AM
Taking my first plunge into Tolkien... hobbit, then trilogy, then maybe more?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BJohnD on December 30, 2005, 01:13:45 PM
I'd start with The Hobbit, because it's a an easy intro (being primarily a children's book) and because it sets the stage so nicely for the LOTR trilogy.ÂÂ  I was very glad I'd read about Bilbo's "There and Back Again" adventure before launching into the trilogy, as wonderful as the latter is.ÂÂ  (Wonderful enough, IMHO, to merit several full re-readings over the years.)

Neat little piece of trivia:ÂÂ  In the original 1930s version of The Hobbit, the ring Bilbo finds is a neat little thing, but not terribly sinister.ÂÂ  It turns him invisible and all that, but it doesn't have the same corrupting power.ÂÂ  When Tolkien started writing the continuation of TH, he realized the ring would be The Ring of Power, the focus of the story.ÂÂ  So he went back and rewrote part of TH, having honest little Bilbo trick Gollum rather meanly to acquire the Ring, and lie to Gandalf about how he got it, to show its corrupting influence.ÂÂ  This is the version one finds in bookstores today.

As for me, I'm enjoying The Paul Evdokimov Reader.ÂÂ  Most impressive.ÂÂ  But I've taken a brief timeout to re-read The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. George on December 30, 2005, 01:47:55 PM
I'd start with The Hobbit, because it's a an easy intro (being primarily a children's book) and because it sets the stage so nicely for the LOTR trilogy.  I was very glad I'd read about Bilbo's "There and Back Again" adventure before launching into the trilogy, as wonderful as the latter is.  (Wonderful enough, IMHO, to merit several full re-readings over the years.)   

This was the advice my friend gave me: Go Hobbit, Trilogy, then The Simarilion, then the Unfinished tales and whatnot.  Thanks for the trivia point, too!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BJohnD on December 30, 2005, 03:05:07 PM
You're welcome.  "Trivial" is my middle name. 

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on December 30, 2005, 03:14:20 PM
Eragon and Eldest are so great, aurelia - you'll enjoy the 2nd book! go to your local library, it'll be in the kid's/young adult section. and cleveland - makes me so happy you're makin your first foray into Tolkien! you wont be disappointed!

as for me, i am kinda nuts right now w/ my books....i am still rereading LOTR (i'm in Two Towers now), Chronicles of Narnia (Prince Caspian), Harry Potter (Half-Blood Prince), and now I have moved onto the next book I am up to in the Redwall series (Salamandastron)...and finally, at last i got my hands on the sequal to Gregory Maguire's book Wicked, called Son of a Witch, which i just started last night and I am so excited about because Wicked was wonderful. anyone who is into fairy-tales or kid's stories at all, I recommend his work - he rewrites common fairy-tales w/ an adult sensibility (Wicked is the Oz story from the perspective of the Wicked Witch of the West, starting from when she is a little green-colored baby - others include Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister and Mirror Mirror, the 1st a retelling of Cinderella and the 2nd a retelling of, i think, snow white).

so, yea, im in fantasy land - best place to be when it comes to books :)

D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on December 30, 2005, 06:24:39 PM
Son of a Witch,

I LOVED Wicked, I so want to read the sequel.  ave to pay off some library fines first though...bad me... :o
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 01, 2006, 11:27:07 PM
C.S. Lewis and the Catholic Church by Joseph Pearce.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Juggler on February 02, 2006, 05:18:02 AM
The Orthodox Way
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Timos on February 03, 2006, 03:21:48 PM
Starting on The Secret of the Rosary by St. Louis De Montfort (130 pgs, TAN books) and Baudolino by Umberto Eco- its gonna take me forever to get through this one- its small type and its like 520 pgs.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: NicholasOhio on February 03, 2006, 04:32:25 PM
This was the advice my friend gave me: Go Hobbit, Trilogy, then The Simarilion, then the Unfinished tales and whatnot.  Thanks for the trivia point, too!

Fantastic choices all!  I tend to read LoTR about once every year or so, and have done so since ca. 1982.  During my time at CSU I took part in two marathon readings (for both The Two Towers and The Return of The King) held at Mather Mansion.  I got to read a lot of the Gollum sequences, and was nowhere near as good as what was in the last two films.  Good times nonetheless.

Right now I'm reading At The Corner or East and Now by Frederica Mathewes-Green, and am about to start The Living Bread by Thomas Merton.

N

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Elisha on February 03, 2006, 06:13:02 PM
Right now I'm reading At The Corner or East and Now by Frederica Mathewes-Green....

So am I!  I'm on pg.103 at the moment.  I think she does a great job of weaving theology/praxis (and explaining it) with her narrative, but fails to really keep in mind that the actual praxis/ability of those in her own parish are beginners/amateurs wrt Orthodoxy and just doing their best - considering that she only has a few "cradle" Orthodox in her parish.  I'm enjoying the book - it is very light in reading and reads quickly.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Bizzlebin on February 03, 2006, 06:19:51 PM
I just re-read "The Great Divorce" by C.S. Lewis. Great peice.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BJohnD on February 03, 2006, 07:15:12 PM
The Spiritual Counsels of Father John of Kronstadt, a 230-page "Reader's Digest" version of My Life in Christ.  I came across this book, a 1960s paperback in British-English translation, one evening before Vespers when I decided to take a peek at our parish's humble little library.  As soon as I opened it I became aware that it was exactly the book I needed to be reading right then, if you know what I mean.  It's an amazing work -- I highly recommend it or any similar distillations of MLIC.

(The book is old enough for the translator to have noted that while the "political situation" in the USSR had not permitted the MP to glorify St. John, the Church in Exile had done so.)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. David on February 03, 2006, 08:33:58 PM
Recently finished:

Caramelo by Sandra Cisneros (English Version)
Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier
Memoria de mis putas tristes by Gabriel García Márquez

Currently reading:

Apologia Against Those Who Decry Holy Images by St. John of Damascus
Christ in the Psalms by Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon
Mountain of Silence: A Search for Orthodox Spirituality by Kyriacos C. Markides
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: NicholasOhio on February 03, 2006, 08:47:54 PM
So am I!  I'm on pg.103 at the moment.  - it is very light in reading and reads quickly.

I'm only on pg. 40 or so.  Just picked up a copy of Facing East as well, but I'm at least a week from being able to start on it.  My list is too long...I'll never get around to everything.

N
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 04, 2006, 12:43:06 AM
Finished the book on C.S. Lewis. I had read the Chronicles of Narnia and a few of his other books, but I must admit that I had a bit of an idealized notion of the man. It was insightful reading not just about his good points, but also his faults. Especially interesting was the way that Tolkien and others sometimes spoke of/to him. Anyway, got some new books from B&N:

A Brief History of the Paradox: Philosophy and the Labyrinths of the Mind, by Roy Sorensen
Whose Bible Is It? A Short History of the Scriptures, by Jaroslav Pelikan
The Problems of Philosophy, by Bertrand Russell
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: DavidH on February 04, 2006, 02:12:27 AM
I just re-read "The Great Divorce" by C.S. Lewis. Great peice.

 Me too- VERY thought-provoking.
 On another note- can't wait for someone to put the Silmarillion on the Big Screen.....it should cure insomnia as we know it!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Thomas on February 04, 2006, 05:27:42 AM
Just finished the entire series of the Chronicles of Narnia and now paraphrasing the stories for my young grandchildren ages 4 to 7. My ten year old grandson and I are reading the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe aloud and discussingthe theological basis of the book.  He is really doing well at it.  I am looking for a good spiritual study  and meditation for Great Lent---any suggestions.

In Christ,
Thomas
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Bizzlebin on February 04, 2006, 05:30:12 AM
Me too- VERY thought-provoking.

Indeed. It's very Orthodox as well. There are some disagreements I have with it, but I wonder how many of those are due to his actual theology as opposed to the inherent limitations of the metaphor.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Marat on February 04, 2006, 01:21:48 PM
The Orthodox Way

I just bought that yesterday to read after my priest recommended it. I've heard so many great things about it.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TomS on February 04, 2006, 06:02:49 PM
Listening to:

http://www.live365.com/stations/tobit
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on February 22, 2006, 03:46:12 PM
Indeed. It's very Orthodox as well. There are some disagreements I have with it, but I wonder how many of those are due to his actual theology as opposed to the inherent limitations of the metaphor.

If you have time or inclination, would you please explain your thoughts here a bit?

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 22, 2006, 05:30:19 PM
Recently read "The Sword of the Prophet" by Serge Trifkovic

Next I'm probably going to read "The Crusades Through Arab eyes" by Amin Maalouf.

Sort of picking my way through "Dock in the Dock" C.S. Lewis.

Re-read the Chronicles of Narnia after seeing "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe"

Just finished "Till We Have Faces" - by Lewis. What a wonderful book!

"The Inner Kingdom" by Bishop Ware - another wonderful book!

Read a couple of Roman mystery novels and some Jane Austen in between. I like diversification :)

Have a huge and rather daunting pile of reading for Lent. :o
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Zoe on February 22, 2006, 06:37:50 PM
Wisdom from Mount Athos: The Writings of Staretz Silouan
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 22, 2006, 08:23:51 PM
A Brief History of Time, by Stephen Hawking
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Bizzlebin on February 23, 2006, 06:47:04 PM
If you have time or inclination, would you please explain your thoughts here a bit?

Sure. Some of the major things were the destruction of people, the fact that only some people in Heaven were "close enough" to help others, and there was one more, the biggest I think, but I can't recall what it was. Anyways, for the first, I am referring especially to the main with the mime on a chain, where he completely "poofs." I understand the point of the sin completely taking over, but it seems to be teaching that the sin "replaces" the person, whereas what actually happens is that the person is just controlled by the sin, but never gone. Also, the fact that only the "lower" citizens of Heaven were allowed/able to help newcomers, and that the holier ones couldn't even see them, was wrong; it is very backwards. Jesus Himself came to help that very type of people, and as we see in Orthodoxy, the more saintly peopel are in fact the ones that make most of an impact. (Again, sorry I can't remmeber the other problem.) But as I mentioned before, I am not sure if these are due to his actual theology of Heaven/Hell, or simply the limitations of the analogy he used.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TomS on February 27, 2006, 08:47:46 PM
I am reading this book now:

The Lost Christianities: The Battles for Scripture and the Faiths We Never Knew

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195141830/103-7720416-3448648?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n=283155

It is very interesting.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GiC on February 27, 2006, 09:09:00 PM
Stonewall in the Valley: Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's Shenandoah Valley Campaign, Spring 1862

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0811720640/sr=8-1/qid=1141088829/ref=pd_bbs_1/103-0037260-7689425?%5Fencoding=UTF8
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: QuoVadis on March 01, 2006, 07:49:01 PM
I'm now reading "Consoler of Suffering Hearts - The Life, Counsels and Miracles of Eldress Rachel, Visionary of Russia" by Archpriest Sergei Levedev.  I haven't been able to put this book down since I received it in the mail.  It is a beautiful witness of a beautiful Christian - one whom we can emulate.  Eldress Rachel's absolute faith in God has really encouraged me and touched my heart.  Has anyone else ever read this book?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on March 02, 2006, 12:35:03 PM
I am not sure if these are due to his actual theology of Heaven/Hell, or simply the limitations of the analogy he used.

Thank you for explaining. I think that it was due to the limits of the analogy.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Krysostomos on March 08, 2006, 09:22:14 AM
Reading just now HH Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler: The Art of Happines. A handbook for living.
I find Dalai a very exaiting personality. Once he said beeing a marxist as much as a buddist.
His Holiness is visiting next summer even the little country of Finland...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on April 11, 2006, 12:48:50 AM
Bone Wars: The Excavation and Celebrity of Andrew Carnegie's Dinosaur, by Tom Rea
Lost Christianities: The Battle for Scripture and Faiths We Never Knew, by Bart D. Ehrman
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on April 11, 2006, 08:50:25 AM
"Heart of Darkness" by Joseph Conrad for my class.
Just finished "Pretender" by Cherryh, the lastest in her "Foriegner" series (It's SF)

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SouthSerb99 on April 11, 2006, 09:38:19 AM
"Living the Liturgy" by Father Harakas.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EkhristosAnesti on April 11, 2006, 10:02:25 AM
To Believe or Not to Believe: Readings in the Philosophy of Religion, E.D. Klemke
The Suffering Servant: Isaiah 53 in Christian and Jewish Sources, ed. B. Junowski, P. Stuhl Macher
Greek in a Nutshell: An Outline of Greek Grammar with Brief Reading Lessons, J. Strong
Australian Federal Constitutional Law: Commentary and Materials, G. Winterton, inter alia.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: The Wolf on April 11, 2006, 02:58:07 PM
"Heart of Darkness" by Joseph Conrad for my class.
Just finished "Pretender" by Cherryh, the lastest in her "Foriegner" series (It's SF)

Ebor


Conrad is one of the greats I love his work.
The Ni**er of the Narssisus is my favourite.
I also  love Thomas Hardy and am currently reading "The Trumpet Major".
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on April 11, 2006, 11:20:31 PM
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech, What is Goodbye? by Nikki Grimes, Simon and Garfunkel: The Biography by Victoria Kingston, and still workin my way slowly through LOTR (Tolkien) and the Time Quartet by Madeline L'Engle (I'm on A Wind in the Door).

I just read Holes by Louis Sacher in 2 very fast sittings this weekend...I highly recommend this Newberry Award Winner.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: bergschlawiner on April 12, 2006, 12:09:47 PM
 Ordered this book from my local library which they purchased:
Author Stamatis, Steven P.  
Title The Janissary factor-- in the name of God : a novel / by Steven P. Stamatis.  
Publication info. Baltimore : Publish America, c2004. http://catalog.kcls.org/search/Kstamatis&searchscope=1&SORT=D/Kstamatis&searchscope=1&SORT=D/1%2C2%2C2%2CB/frameset&FF=Kstamatis&searchscope=1&SORT=D&1%2C1%2C (http://catalog.kcls.org/search/Kstamatis&searchscope=1&SORT=D/Kstamatis&searchscope=1&SORT=D/1%2C2%2C2%2CB/frameset&FF=Kstamatis&searchscope=1&SORT=D&1%2C1%2C)
This fiction novel is very pooly written but does have an interesting plot where a Janissary rebellion 200 years ago in Turkey ressulted in the Sultan eliminating the Janissaries as a guard force, however some were spared and organized a secret organiation with the goal of ethnic Greeks and others in the units assuming the identity of their Christian ancestors and working secretely to infiltrate the Partiarchy of Constanitinople with bishops who are secret Muslims trained in both faiths with the gol of having one of them become patriarch as a Turkish secret agent.  Of course the hero uncovers the plot and saves the Patriach who is obviously Bartholomew with the name of Timothy.  Not very well written and could have been done better.
 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Amdetsion on April 12, 2006, 02:01:27 PM
Krysostomos

I did not know that the dalai lama was any interest to an Orthodox Christian; since of Orthodox Christians are followers of Christ.

And you used the prefix HH in your description of this man. You can not mean 'His Holiness'...right?

I am assuming that either you were joking or I misunderstood what you posted. I pray that either situation is the case.

If you are truly reading with interest the thoughts of this man than I suggest that you speak with your Priest on this.

I was taught that the Orthodox church teaches reading books, watching videos or listening to people which are teaching ideas that are not consistent with the teachings of the Orthodox church are to be avoided; especially when they are teaching alternative means of procuring spiritual peace and relevance; and that during the great fast reading, watching TV an all other forms of entertainment should be avoided including listening to music or other oratory that is not particularly intended to enrich the growth of the Orthodox Christian spirit.
I do not know many people who follow this but it is still taught and kept strongly in Ethiopia and I find it good stewartship from the Fathers to help keep people focused on the fast so that the fast is not merely a 'vegan diet'. The point is that the EYES, EARS, STOMACH and all other parts of the body is to be subject to the fast...not just the stomach. Even the mind should not imagine profane things or silliness but focus on righteous thoughts and ideas.


Just a little advise to you and all (as well as myself).

On the subject I am reading 'God or nothing else' by HH (His Holiness) Pope Shenouda III; Patriarch of Alexandria and the the See of St. Mark. I just finished 'the seven words of Christ of the cross' also by HH Pope Shenouda III. This was an amazing book which like all of his books rings clear and enriches your faith in Christ and His Church.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PeterTheAleut on April 12, 2006, 02:17:39 PM
Whew, this thread is too long for me to read all your responses in one sitting.  I guess I'll just chime in with my response.  I'm currently reading--for the fifth time--The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien.  Excellent story! :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Keble on April 12, 2006, 02:27:37 PM
I read Holes some years back when I got it for my eldest, not long before the movie. I think it's wonderful (the movie isn't bad either, but the book is better).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on April 12, 2006, 11:29:26 PM
Yea I haven't gotten around to the movie Holes yet, but I am wary of the fact that Stanley is not overweight in the movie...I am a fan of the actor playing Stanley, and I think he has the right personality for it, so it may be okay. But I'll hafta wait and see...I suspect the book will have my heart on this one though, if it's between the book and the movie.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Krysostomos on April 13, 2006, 07:17:21 AM
Krysostomos

I did not know that the dalai lama was any interest to an Orthodox Christian; since of Orthodox Christians are followers of Christ.



I am rc, who reads all kind of books - even orthodox ones...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: montalban on April 13, 2006, 07:40:42 AM
This is just a thread to ask what everyone is reading.
At the moment I'm reading this thread.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PeterTheAleut on April 13, 2006, 12:17:10 PM
At the moment I'm reading this thread.

SMARTASS!!!  ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: montalban on April 13, 2006, 07:43:02 PM
SMARTASS!!!  ;)
This little black duck thinks sometimes I do act a smartarse (maybe too many times).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Amdetsion on April 13, 2006, 08:06:27 PM
Kryssotomos

Oh! you are RC. Now I understand.

I find that all the RC's I have ever met to date (now including you) are very, very liberal about the faith in Christ and fasting is non-existent.

I find it unfortunate that so many RC's believe in all kinds of things. Things which are not even related to the teachings of the RCC. Observing this I can understand why the Orthodox fathers stress care in what the faithful read and experience.

I hope one day you will understand that it is not good to read, listen to, or watch anything you want if you are trying to be committed to a faithful life in Christ. As one Holy Father noted 'some things are not worth knowing.....avoid glib and profane curiosity'.

As I know you have heard 'curiosity killed the cat'.

Enjoy your reading.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on April 13, 2006, 08:16:08 PM
Got three more books today (for my B-day), which I'll probably start tonight:

Basic Writings of Kant
Critique of Religion and Philosophy, Walter Kaufmann
Atheism: A Reader, S.T. Joshi
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: montalban on April 13, 2006, 10:04:21 PM
Got three more books today (for my B-day), which I'll probably start tonight:

Basic Writings of Kant
Critique of Religion and Philosophy, Walter Kaufmann
Atheism: A Reader, S.T. Joshi
I think I'd rather wait till the film came out. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: The Wolf on April 14, 2006, 02:55:37 AM
Kryssotomos

Oh! you are RC. Now I understand.

I find that all the RC's I have ever met to date (now including you) are very, very liberal about the faith in Christ and fasting is non-existent.

I find it unfortunate that so many RC's believe in all kinds of things. Things which are not even related to the teachings of the RCC. Observing this I can understand why the Orthodox fathers stress care in what the faithful read and experience.

I hope one day you will understand that it is not good to read, listen to, or watch anything you want if you are trying to be committed to a faithful life in Christ. As one Holy Father noted 'some things are not worth knowing.....avoid glib and profane curiosity'.

As I know you have heard 'curiosity killed the cat'.

Enjoy your reading.

Well that all sound very negative, judgmental, and closed minded, if you don't mind me saying so.
However I will say "if you keep your mind too open your brain is in danger of falling out!"
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Amdetsion on April 15, 2006, 01:08:13 AM
Kryssotomos

You are right on two points.

First my mind is "closed" to Christ.
The teachings of Christ are pure truth to me. I will not (intentionally) read, listen, or watch anything I believe is designed to challenge the truth of God and His Holy Church such as Di Vinci Code and other types of pseudo spiritual an new age type propaganda.

Second I was a rather harsh but only because I am so disappointed when I experience the behavior I described from people. I was speaking out of frustration...my apologies. I can not understand why Christian people can not See that the faith in Christ is under attack. The biggest enemy is complacency, boredom then curiosity...soon Christ was the only truth then out of nowhere...Buddha is also truth. Remember Our God says he is a jealous God. His truth is the final truth with His true believers.

I thus agree that its too much openness of mind that has caused people to loose much.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on April 15, 2006, 12:26:14 PM
Quote
I think I'd rather wait till the film came out.

Yeah, I can see it now...  The Life and Times of Kant! He lived his life in the clouds of a towering intellect, until one day it all came crashing down around him in skepticism. But then--aha!--he found the path to enlightenment, and his skepticism vanished before a philosophical argumentation in favor of theism that was to influence the western world forevermore. Starring Michael Richards (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Richards) as Immanuel Kant.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: DavidH on April 16, 2006, 09:37:40 AM
I have just begun "Three Views on Eastern Orthodoxy and Evangelicalism" published by Zondervan. It is written in  a point-counterpoint format by both Orthodox and Evangelicals trying to explore how close/ different the two essentially are. Very interesting read as both sides are respectful to each other without watering down their own convictions.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on April 17, 2006, 08:40:28 AM
did not know that the dalai lama was any interest to an Orthodox Christian; since of Orthodox Christians are followers of Christ.

I am not going to start a debate but I have found over the years that HH the Dalai Lama has some very wise observations on life to share. So does Thich Nhat Hanh.  If you want specifics, I can recommend any book that you may find in the library. ÂÂ

Oh, and I believer that His Holiness is the man's title, so it is proper to use it.  Or do yuou not call the Pope "Pope so and so the X?"
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EkhristosAnesti on April 17, 2006, 08:51:34 AM
I am not going to start a debate but I have found over the years that HH the Dalai Lama has some very wise observations on life to share. So does Thich Nhat Hanh.  If you want specifics, I can recommend any book that you may find in the library. ÂÂ

Oh, and I believer that His Holiness is the man's title, so it is proper to use it.  Or do yuou not call the Pope "Pope so and so the X?"

So what if it's his self-attributed title? What if he wanted to call himself God?

I remember on the Dr. Phil show a couple of years ago, Dr. Phil was interviewing the leader of the Railean (sp?) cult (he's the guy who believes Jesus and Muhammed etc. were aliens and that he met them on some spaceship or some crap like that). He also attributed the title "His Holiness" to himself, and demanded that Dr. Phil address him in that way. After a minor dispute Dr. Phil gave in just for the sake of allowing the discussion to continue.

Would you address that guy as His Holiness? How about Muhammed, would you grant him the title "The Prophet Muhammed"? Seriously, where do you draw the line?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on April 17, 2006, 08:58:53 AM
He didn't give himself the title, he inherited it.

You may want to read this since you seem to be confused.  You still didnt say whether you call the Pope the Pope.

His Holiness The Dalai Lama
From the official site of the Government Of Tibet In Exile. Provides a biography, bibliography, list of awards won, prayers, lectures and statements.

http://www.tibet.com/DL/index.html  (http://www.tibet.com/DL/index.html)

Anyway, back to the topic, I'm reading The Sims2 OFB guide. Not exactly deep reading, but this pack has some really funky stuff!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EkhristosAnesti on April 17, 2006, 09:07:34 AM
Quote
He didn't give himself the title, he inherited it.

That's really quite irrelevant. Whether he personally attributes it to himself, or whether his followers attribute it to him by virtue of his position within that cult, the fact remains that he is not worthy of such a title. Christ alone is Holy and He imparts that Holiness to His Church, hence the worthiness of Saints and Heirarchs of the Church bearing such a title.

Quote
You still didnt say whether you call the Pope the Pope.

Well putting aside the fact that the RC Church stole the title Pope from the Alexandrians, I woul probably say "RC Pope", which is alot more objective. Tell me, would you attribute the title "His Holiness" to the Pope? Don't all the Apostolic Churches, whether they be RC, OO, or EO qualify their Patriarchs/Popes with "His Holiness" and their Bishops with "His Grace" or "His Eminence"?

Would you call our Coptic Pope "His Holiness Pope Shenouda III"? No, and I wouldn't really expect you to. Yet somehow Mr. Lama earns that title?

And you didn't answer my question as to whether you would address Muhammed as "The Prophet Muhammed".
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on April 17, 2006, 09:29:57 AM
I'm currently reading my two shelves of cookbooks desperately trying to find recipes for marinades for lamb on the spit, cheese and spinach pie, tsoureki, taramosalata etc etc. I have close to a 60 people arriving next weekend for "an authentic mountain Greek Pascha" (as the invitation said) and I haven't even started cleaning yet. Had all good intentions though.......
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on April 17, 2006, 11:26:14 AM
Have you checked online? There are quite a few sites with tons of traditional Greek recipies, just sifting through the variations is the hard part! ("my yia yia used this, my auntie used that, my mother swears that you shoudld add a pinch of the other" that sort of thing, lol!)  I love to read cookbooks, except it makes me hungry!  Here's a link for you if you like, though I only just found it and haven't tried any yet.

http://www.enostos.net/recipes/ (http://www.enostos.net/recipes/)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on April 17, 2006, 11:34:38 AM
Have you checked online? There are quite a few sites with tons of traditional Greek recipies, just sifting through the variations is the hard part! ("my yia yia used this, my auntie used that, my mother swears that you shoudld add a pinch of the other" that sort of thing, lol!)  I love to read cookbooks, except it makes me hungry!  Here's a link for you if you like, though I only just found it and haven't tried any yet.

http://www.enostos.net/recipes/ (http://www.enostos.net/recipes/)

Thanks for that! There's also a very kind experienced lamb-roasting poster who pm'ed me with a marinade suggestion. And if I tell you what it is, you'll probably work out who sent it.....
hint: the marinade is beer.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Amdetsion on April 17, 2006, 12:26:09 PM
EkristosAnesti

Very good!

Considering the views you have been posting...I suggest not to continue trying the matter with Aurelia (I hope I spelled that right). She has a right to her own view and how she sees and respects other.

You have however defended and made an excellent and unarguable case for Christ' Church which is Holy, Universal and Orthodox.

"mr. lama" (perfect for him) has NO spiritual authority or power; he is a pagan and a heathen and thus regardless of what he has as an "official" title he is not worthy of HH particular from an Orthodox Christian. The HH would make him equal with our Church fathers...AND HE IS NOT!!!

Orthodox Christians do not use this title with anyone or for anyone unless he is an appropriately elevated "Christian"  Orthodox father of the Holy Universal Church. This still  includes the Roman See.

I am only repeating what you have already said (I know). I just wanted to add some emphasis.

I do not mean to offend but it is hard for people who are outside of sound Orthodox up bringing to understand certain issues. We must give people a chance to learn.

May The Lord Bless HH Pope Shenouda III, Patriarch of Alexandria and the the See or St. Mark and all the Orthodox Bishops, Priest and Deacons.

So what are you reading or have read during the great lent?

I am on my second book written by HH Pope Shenouda

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on April 17, 2006, 12:28:33 PM
Last week, I was reading Joyce's "Araby" and Woolf's "A Room of One's Own" for my college class.  I'll have to check what this week's assignment is.  (Not that *that* was all I was reading.  ;D)

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: The Wolf on April 17, 2006, 05:54:41 PM
I've finished the last few books I was reading and have now gone onto.
Joseph Conrad's "Nostromo" and Roger Scruton's "The meaning of Conservatism"
Have you read them?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Krysostomos on April 18, 2006, 06:18:16 AM
Kryssotomos

Oh! you are RC. Now I understand.


As I know you have heard 'curiosity killed the cat'.


.
Well, one catholic nun here in Finland once read a book by metropolitan Anthony. He discussed the book with her parish priest, who warned her: "Remember it´s orthodox theology!" The sister still dares to read orthodox books. So do I - and many others, too.
Back to the topic ! Now I´m reading "The difference of the nature philosophy of Demoktitos and Epikuros" by Dr. Karl Marx, that was tranlated to Finnish last year about 150 years after Mr. Marx wrote it...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on April 25, 2006, 09:58:31 PM
Just picked up An Essay Concerning Human Understanding by John Locke. It was less than $10 at Barnes and Noble... that has to be a first (for things not on the bargain shelves) :)  Also got the third season of News Radio... not that one would read News Radio, but hey, I'm just sayin'...

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GiC on April 25, 2006, 11:02:46 PM
I just got my copy of Thomas Cutler's The Battle of Leyte Gulf supposed to be an excellent objective history of the battle, accompanied by an in depth tactical analysis...can't wait to dig in. Though I'm only about half way through my copy of Robert Tanner's Stonewall in the Valley, which, while being THE definitive work on the '62 Shenandoah Campaign, is an amazingly engaging and entertaining read with excellent and insightful strategic, tactical, logistic, and operational analysis...highly recommended.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on April 26, 2006, 06:05:05 AM
I must be the only 39 year old modern Christian who hadn't read "The Screwtape Letters". My copy arrived and I couldn't put it down! Had an "Agripnia" ("All-night Vigil") of reading it last night! Excellent!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on April 26, 2006, 02:58:18 PM
I must be the only 39 year old modern Christian who hadn't read "The Screwtape Letters". My copy arrived and I couldn't put it down! Had an "Agripnia" ("All-night Vigil") of reading it last night! Excellent!

I'm shocked I tell you, SHOCKED!!!

 ;D

I"m glad you found it and like it.  Lewis has some very good and insightful things to say.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on April 26, 2006, 03:01:23 PM
Last week for class I read 2 short stories by D. H. Lawrence ("Odour of Chrysanthemums" and "Horse Dealer's Daughter") and Eliot's "Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock".  This week it's one by V. S. Naipaul and 2 by Katherine Mansfield.  

I also got an interesting paperback on the Australian guerilla warfare against the Japanese in WWII "Ring of Fire"  

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on April 28, 2006, 09:00:22 AM
Today I picked up "Debrett's New Guide to Etiquette & Modern Manners" (which, by the way, I've never opened before) to settle an argument with a friend about the etiquette of breastfeeding in public. The relevant paragraph began:
"It is bad manners to expel any liquid from any orifice in public, and breast-feeding is no different."
When I finally stopped laughing and wiped the tears from my eyes, I decided to start reading it from cover to cover- if for nothing else but the entertainment value!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on April 28, 2006, 02:35:43 PM
Today I picked up "Debrett's New Guide to Etiquette & Modern Manners" (which, by the way, I've never opened before) to settle an argument with a friend about the etiquette of breastfeeding in public. The relevant paragraph began:
"It is bad manners to expel any liquid from any orifice in public, and breast-feeding is no different."
When I finally stopped laughing and wiped the tears from my eyes, I decided to start reading it from cover to cover- if for nothing else but the entertainment value!

 :D :D

That *is* an interesting way of phrasing things....

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tsarina on April 28, 2006, 02:38:11 PM
I recently just finished reading a book about Papa Nicholas Planas [a Greek saint from Athens]. I'm planning on starting a book called "Elder Ambrose of Optina" By Fr. Sergius Chetveriskov.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: cradle east on April 28, 2006, 03:14:18 PM
I recently started reading Orthodox Synthesis: The Unity of Theological Thought from SVS Press.  A great read thus far.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PeterTheAleut on May 09, 2006, 02:15:25 AM
I just finished The Lord of the Rings during Bright Week, so now I've started reading The Arena by St. Ignatius Brianchaninov.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on May 09, 2006, 08:48:55 AM
Mrs Piggle Wiggle. I needed something light.  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on May 09, 2006, 10:46:39 AM
Good old Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle and her cures.  :)

We finished the two Katherine Mansfield stories and one by V. S. Naipaul for class.  Both very good writers.  Now I have to finish my last essay and a short piece looking at the class and the semester.


Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: orth_christian2000 on May 09, 2006, 12:15:30 PM
I just finished reading Sotos Chondropoulos' book on St. Nektarios, and I am just now delving into Jonathan Phillips' historical read, "The Fourth Crusade and the Sack of Constantinople". 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ωραία ελληνίς on May 23, 2006, 04:41:25 AM
Ο Αόρατος Πόλεμος-The Invisible War of Saint Nicodemus the Athonite
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tsarina on May 24, 2006, 06:58:20 PM
I am now reading the book called "The Orthodox Way" by Bishop Kallistos Ware, again.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on June 01, 2006, 05:00:34 PM
I was clearing out a box and found "Montana- The Gold Frontier" by Dan Cushman.  So that's one of my reading books now, along with "Lud in the Mist" by Mirrlees, and the Waley translation of "The Tale of Genji" and biographies of George IV of England and George Burns the comedian and a Neil Gaiman book. (Can you tell I went to the library this week?  ;D )

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on June 01, 2006, 05:11:25 PM
Oh yes, and "The Reluctant Admiral" about Admiral Yamamoto in WWII

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: chrisc on June 09, 2006, 08:51:11 PM
The Imitation of Christ, The Way of a Pilgrim and The Philokalia, Volume 2 - for the second time.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on June 10, 2006, 05:58:33 PM
"The Last Shogun" by Ryotaro Shiba.  A biography/study of the last of the Tokugawa shoguns who *peacefully* gave way to the Meiji Restoration (and ending up living to a quiet old age)

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on June 12, 2006, 04:56:55 PM
oooh, that sounds right up my alley, Ebor, I'll have to try and find a copy.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Carpatho Russian on June 12, 2006, 09:00:48 PM
I just finished reading N.T. Wright's The New Testament and the People of God.  I'm looking forward to reading Vol. 2, Jesus and the Victory of God.  I'm slowly making my way through Pavel Florensky's The Pillar and Ground of the Truth.  And for fun, I'm reading Donna Leon's Commissario Giudo Brunetti's detective mysteries.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on June 13, 2006, 10:19:02 PM
oooh, that sounds right up my alley, Ebor, I'll have to try and find a copy.

If you are interested in Japan, I can recommend some excellent books.  What interests you in particular?  History?  Modern?  Social?

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: grov on July 07, 2006, 05:10:27 PM
Sorry if this has already been discussed... but what about AudioBooks?

Any recommendations that are relevant to the Faith?  I have a 2 hour commute every day.

I already grabbed the Tolstoy and Dostoevsky books on tape that I've found.

Thanks,
George
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tsarina on July 07, 2006, 07:27:39 PM
I'm currently reading a book called called "Shepherd of Souls"- The Life and Teachings of Elder Celopa. Elder Celopa is said to be the master of Inner Prayer and Spiritual Father of Romania (1912-1998). This book is by Archimandrite Ioanichie Balan, awesome stuff in this book! I reccomend it to everyone. ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on August 03, 2006, 08:26:45 PM
Currently reading "Ambassador Morgenthau's Story" by Henry Morgenthau. Henry Morganthau was the US Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire from 1913-1916. His book is a harrowing first hand account of the Armenian genocide.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on August 03, 2006, 09:44:30 PM
Currently reading "Ambassador Morgenthau's Story" by Henry Morgenthau. Henry Morganthau was the US Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire from 1913-1916. His book is a harrowing first hand account of the Armenian genocide.

What genocide??? Turks say we Greeks and Armenians made it up...hmmm...Morgenthau doesn't sound like an Armenian name.  ;) Could it be true  :o.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on August 04, 2006, 07:16:39 AM
[quote author=Αριστοκλής link=topic=3406.msg130285#msg130285 date=1154655870]
Morgenthau doesn't sound like an Armenian name.  ;) Could it be true  :o.
[/quote]

It actually gets worse. Ambassador Morgenthau was a German-born Jewish American!
At any rate, the book is available to read online as well: http://www.cilicia.com/morgenthau/MorgenTC.htm (http://www.cilicia.com/morgenthau/MorgenTC.htm)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. David on August 04, 2006, 10:04:53 AM
How Few Remain (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&isbn=0345406141&itm=1), by Harry Turtledove.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EkhristosAnesti on August 04, 2006, 09:34:44 PM
Mounce, Basics of Biblical Greek
Plato, The Trial and Death of Socrates
Ross, Y., Ethics in Law
Warraq, I., The Origins of the Koran
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Carpatho Russian on August 05, 2006, 09:36:30 AM
The Dante Club by Matthew Pearl
On the Dormition of Mary - Early Patristic Homilies SVS Press
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: suzannes on August 05, 2006, 10:55:51 AM
Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo.  For a church book-group.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Cephas on August 05, 2006, 12:29:05 PM
+ Irini nem ehmot,

Finishing up the Gospel of St. John and I'll be starting the Epistle to the Romans afterwards.  Does anyone know of any good commentaries on Romans?  Any recommendations would be great.

Please pray for me.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on August 05, 2006, 11:44:29 PM
Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo.  For a church book-group.

I REALLY got bogged down on that book. Strange because I thought Toilers of the Sea was one of the best books I have ever read (in translation, of course).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tsarina on August 13, 2006, 05:02:14 PM
I'm currently reading, "St. John Chrysostom- Six Books On the Priesthood."

I've only read some of the book, and it's amazing! Looking forward to the next chapter.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on August 13, 2006, 05:41:04 PM
That was an interesting text by St. John, though I think it's sort of funny how he rationalizes his deception of his friend. Not that I think he's wrong or did anything immoral, it's just that if someone did the same today and tried to excuse it away, the traditionalists (and even most moderate Orthodox) would be all over him as having sinned, and yet here is one of the most celebrated saints of the Orthodox Church doing that kind of thing. Anyway, the widespread and accepted use of deception in Church history is another topic altogether... maybe I'll make a thread on that, since it's not really fair for me to just let that hanging out there :)

As far as what I've been reading, it's mostly been articles here and there on the internet, with the only book that I've been giving any real time to being Critiques of God: Making the Case Against Belief in God (Ed. by Peter A Angeles). It's been a bit dry, so far. There are a couple essays by Freud and Dewey coming up though... those should be entertaining, if not totally agreeable.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Dismus on August 13, 2006, 06:59:06 PM
Mounce, Basics of Biblical Greek
Plato, The Trial and Death of Socrates
Ross, Y., Ethics in Law
Warraq, I., The Origins of the Koran

How do you like the Koran book so far?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: kansas city on August 13, 2006, 09:25:47 PM
Angelina Jolie - Notes from My Travels
(not kidding  :) )
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on August 14, 2006, 12:24:48 AM
Angelina Jolie - Notes from My Travels
(not kidding  :) )

I actually bought that book when it came out...I started reading it, but for some reason never got drawn in. I was very into all she had done and all the personal changes it seemed to cause in her, but the book just didn't do it for me...I'd be curious as to what you think of it once you finish.

As for what I'm currently reading: I'm perpetually rereading Lord of the Rings, also rereading a fantasy series by Robert Jordan called The Wheel of Time (I'm on Crown of Swords), then there's The Mystery of Christ: Life in Death by Fr. John Behr (very good, this, if challenging at points, but worth the work it takes to get through, definitely), and Into the Wild by John Krakauer.

D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Panagiotis on August 14, 2006, 01:58:30 AM
Quote
On the Dormition of Mary - Early Patristic Homilies SVS Press
On the Dormition of Mary what did you think of the introduction and what did you think of the first writing in the text?
I had some issues though I greatly enjoyed the work.

Christ is in our midst,
Panagiotis
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Carpatho Russian on August 14, 2006, 09:29:43 PM
On the Dormition of Mary what did you think of the introduction and what did you think of the first writing in the text?
I had some issues though I greatly enjoyed the work.
Panagiotis,
Greeting you on the Feast of Our Blessed Mother's Dormition (and thinking of the roast turkey sandwich I'm having for lunch tomorrow!)
I also enjoyed the collection of homilies.  If I may ask, what are some of the issues you had?
As far as the first text of John of Thessalonica, it is very similar to the pious legends of the holy day I was taught in my youth.
CR
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Panagiotis on August 16, 2006, 12:26:52 AM
Quote
As far as the first text of John of Thessalonica, it is very similar to the pious legends of the holy day I was taught in my youth.
The issue I had was not with the legends, its was with the Primacy of Peter and his being chosen to be the "leader of the Apostles" as was stated. Whereas it was never mentioned among the others from what I remembered. Other than that, it touched my heart greatly and gave me great strength in my devotion and intercessory prayer life.

Quote
Greeting you on the Feast of Our Blessed Mother's Dormition
Thank you, good sir and may Her intercessions grant us grace from our Lord of Heaven!

Christ is in our midst,
Panagiotis
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Krysostomos on August 16, 2006, 12:53:42 PM
At the moment I´m reading The Cronicles vol I by Bob Dylan. Last year it was published in Finnish translation, but I try to manage with the authors´ own words...
Bob writes, that he´s not a profet of the young/ old generation - but "the poet singer."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aserb on August 16, 2006, 03:52:39 PM
"Autobiography of Malcolm X" with Alex Haley.

Reads like a novel, the man had a fascinating life. He is one of my heroes.Strange coming from a white, ethnic working class background turned white collar professional dude, but I admire his guts not only to change himself but to try to effect change on a larger sphere. Guts to stand up to hypocrisy even at a cost to himself, his pride, his finances.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: kansas city on August 16, 2006, 05:48:21 PM
As for the Angelina Jolie book..  I feel bad saying that it feels superficial and naive but... it's Angelina Jolie writing a diary on her first impressions of refugee camps, demining campaigns, generally adverse conditions and hostile environments.

 Lots of redundant definitions and general statistics. 
 
She also keeps saying, "I feel bad complaining, these people have nothing, but..."

  I guess i'm still reading hoping for a change toward an insightful, less emotive Angelina to come out with some real commentary, more interesting cameos and an interesting travelogue... She's only got a couple of chapters left though.

In other news I heard she moved out and took the kids... I really thought they'd work.  I should repost that in other topics and get a real all american thread goin
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Carpatho Russian on August 17, 2006, 07:52:06 PM
The issue I had was not with the legends, its was with the Primacy of Peter and his being chosen to be the "leader of the Apostles" as was stated.
I didn't pick up on that when reading John of Thessalonica's account of the Dormition.  However, I don't see an issue with it as the Church has no issue with the "primacy" of Peter among the Apostles.  To quote a stichera from the feast (Glory verse of the Aposticha, tone 4), "At Your departing, O Virgin Theotokos, to Him who was ineffably born of You, James the first bishop and brother of the Lord was there, as so was Peter, the honored leader and chief of the disciples, and the whole sacred fellowship of the apostles."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EkhristosAnesti on November 22, 2006, 07:07:05 AM
I'm finally onto a new batch of books for study:

1) Lambdin, T.O., Introduction to Sahidic Coptic

2) Varipatis, Fr. C., Marriage and the Freedom of the Human Person: Based on the Poetry of ArchBishop Stylianos of Australia

3) Breck, J., Scripture in Tradition

4) A range of commentaries on the Coptic Liturgy of St. Basil by Fr. Abram Sleman, Fr. Athanasius Iskander and Fr. James Soliman.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: lubeltri on November 22, 2006, 04:20:58 PM
I'm reading The Decline of the Secular University, a new book by my former professor, C. John Sommerville.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on November 23, 2006, 12:00:09 AM
Sociology for my class.

"Tales of the Otori" volume 3 by Lian Hearn: "Brilliance of the Moon". The first two books are "Across the Nightingale Floor" and "Grass for His Pillow".  These are novels sent in an imagined period of Japanese history that has elements of several centuries.  One interesting aspect is a group of people called "The Hidden" which while not explicitly Christian, have some relation to the "Kakure Kirishitan" the "Hidden Christians" who were groups of believers who kept the faith as best as they could with limited resources and a danger of death if discovered following the "Closing" of Japan and the explusion of Christianity.

A biography of Tokugawa Ieyesu

and more of course.  ;)

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BlakeMichael on November 29, 2006, 08:25:57 AM
The Law of God by Archpriest Seraphim Slobodskoy. It's a blessing.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on November 29, 2006, 01:12:14 PM
Just finished Hillybilly Gothic:a memoir of madness and motherhood by A. Martini.  Excellent book, especially for those of us who suffered a bout of PPD...even if not to this iextent.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on December 02, 2006, 06:01:25 AM
Just got done reading Religions of Star Trek. It was a lot more superficial in dealing with the material than I expected, especially considering that there were three professors writing it. There was no examination of Picard's lines from Who Watches the Watchers, where he basically condemns religion as delusions and instead endorses a version of scientism. There is no examination of the fact that the Bajoran "Emissary" (and starfleet officer) Sisko is willing to commit mass-murder and/or genocide more than once, and how the Bajorans might feel about such morality. It's just your normal "Ardra represents the Devil" sort of stuff.

Just started reading Babylonian Life and History by Budge.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GiC on December 02, 2006, 09:13:36 AM
Just got done reading Religions of Star Trek. It was a lot more superficial in dealing with the material than I expected, especially considering that there were three professors writing it. There was no examination of Picard's lines from Who Watches the Watchers, where he basically condemns religion as delusions and instead endorses a version of scientism. There is no examination of the fact that the Bajoran "Emissary" (and starfleet officer) Sisko is willing to commit mass-murder and/or genocide more than once, and how the Bajorans might feel about such morality. It's just your normal "Ardra represents the Devil" sort of stuff.

I made the mistake of reading The Physics of Star Trek once, now I realize it's pop science, but considering the type of people actually likely to buy such a book I thought that they might at least present the basics of the theory and a few fundamental equations...not an equation throughout the book and such a basic overview of the science that many things that were said were wrong...oh, and the guy who wrote it had a Ph.D. in physics, if I recall properly...I resolved then to never read any more popular science or 'of Star Trek' books again...I'd rather read a good Journal Article any day :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on January 04, 2007, 08:21:12 AM
Started Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon by Daniel Dennett yesterday. I've never read a book of his before, though I've seen a couple lengthy interviews. (also, fwiw, Dennett was recently in the hospital, which spurred him on to write a short letter titled Thank Goodness! (http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/dennett06/dennett06_index.html))
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Sloga on January 04, 2007, 08:26:36 PM
Started a few days ago reading The Fourth Crusade and the Sack of Constantinople by Nathan Phillips. I've only read the intro so far but it's one of those descriptive and thought provoking books you think about all the time  ;).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on January 04, 2007, 08:37:08 PM
Sloga

We should maybe start a thread on that some time. I think you're the second or third person to mention that book on this thread, and I've read that one as well. 


PS. To whom it may concern, is there some reason that my name is a tag?  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Veniamin on January 04, 2007, 08:55:06 PM
I just finished The Mighty and the Almighty by Madeline Albright, which was rather disappointing.  Right now, I'm reading Active Liberty by Justice Stephen Breyer.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Carpatho Russian on January 04, 2007, 09:05:06 PM
I've just started reading The Plainchant Tradition of Southwestern Rus by Joan Roccasalvo.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: AMM on January 04, 2007, 10:25:33 PM
I've just started reading The Plainchant Tradition of Southwestern Rus by Joan Roccasalvo.

I'm going to have to get that.

I'm getting ready to start "Overthrow: America's Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq".  I just finished "Homestead: The Glory and Tragedy of an American Steel Town". 

I also read Diego Saves the Treefrogs tonight.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GiC on January 05, 2007, 12:08:54 AM
J. F. C. Fuller's The Second World War, 1939-1945: a strategical and tactical history

Very interesting guy, Major-General during WWI serving with distinction in His Majesty's Army, celebrated inter-war theorist, friend of Hart and Guderian not to mention close friend and ally of Sir Oswald Mosley and leading member of the British Union of Fascists, even an acquaintance to Hitler, on top of that he was an occultist and one of the earlier western authors on pagan and far-eastern mysticism...but most of all he was a brilliant military theorist and prolific historian. It's unfortunate that the liberal pc crowd dismiss him because of his political ideology, his objectivity and intelligence far surpasses his peers and as a result his insights are magnificent and unique. Some of the best analysis of latter wars, including Vietnam, out there are little more than a plagiarism of Fuller's military theory, a theory developed in the inter-war era at that (he is to military history what Goebbels is to rhetoric, the Master that everyone reads, and every aspires towards, but no one will admit to).

I'm about half way through this book and I've already come to the conclusion that an understanding of the principles presented is essential to being capable of competently discussing the second world war...it certainly forced me to re-evaluate many deeply held convictions about the war that simply wern't true.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: AMM on January 05, 2007, 01:10:50 AM
Diego saves the treefrogs had a similar effect on me.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aserb on January 05, 2007, 04:22:38 AM
"Homestead: The Glory and Tragedy of an American Steel Town"

I grew up near Homestead, PA and as a result this book has become personal to me having seen, heard and smelled first hand the steel industry.

I am also on an extended run re-reading Hansel and Gretel.  What a violent and mean spirited book, that step-mother and the old witch.  :o
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GiC on January 05, 2007, 08:56:31 AM
Diego saves the treefrogs had a similar effect on me.

It sounds like a profound literary work. ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: AMM on January 05, 2007, 12:58:59 PM
Baby Jaguar is an amazingly complex character.  Not everybody realizes that.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on January 06, 2007, 09:28:44 PM
For complex you should count Swiper.... After all, he will gleefully take things but is stopped cold by the triple "Swiper!  No Swiping!"  Just why would that work?

 :D

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: The young fogey on January 08, 2007, 11:36:47 AM
At the same time: Peter Anson, Bishops at Large (cautionary tales for high churchmen) and Paul Hendrickson, Seminary: A Search (pre-Vatican II RC as it really was; maybe high-school seminaries weren't such a good idea). Next: The Apostolic Fathers edited by Fr Jack Sparks.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Matthew777 on January 10, 2007, 11:57:38 AM
Right now, I'm reading The Varieties of Religious Experience by William James for my philosophy class (or I'm at least pretending well enough to pass my exams).

Peace.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: cholmes on January 10, 2007, 04:51:07 PM
Heading down the home stretch of "The Brothers Karamazov."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: AncientFaith on January 10, 2007, 04:56:25 PM
Heading down the home stretch of "The Brothers Karamazov."

Too many different books on my count :)

1.  Just downloaded Brothers Karamazov to my new Sony Reader - cool toy that my boss gave out to his leadership team - nice boss!

2.  The Road to Serfdom

3.  St. Cyril of Jerusalem

4.  Orthodox Psychotherapy (wonderful book, but I have to take it in small doses).

5.  Thinking about starting "Storming the Barricades" (Chess book)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on January 13, 2007, 04:49:05 PM
Last week, I read Disraeli, by Andre Maurois. This week I have opted for a most profound literary work; Artemis Fowl and the Lost Colony.  ;D

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Νεκτάριος on January 13, 2007, 06:00:09 PM
What I worked on/ am finishing over break:
Conversations with Czeslaw Milosz
The Power of the Powerless and other Essays by Vaclav Havel et al
Dead Souls by Gogol
Fathers and Sons by Turgenev
Fear and Trembling by Kierkegaard
The Sickness unto Death by Kierkegaard

I'm taking a class on Dostoevsky next semester with this reading list:
Crime and Punishment
The Idiots
The Possed/The Demons
The Brothers Karamazov
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EkhristosAnesti on January 13, 2007, 06:10:43 PM
Kamil, J., Christianity in the Land of the Pharoahs: The Coptic Orthodox Church.
Pelikan, J., Acts
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on January 13, 2007, 06:18:02 PM
Quote
I'm taking a class on Dostoevsky next semester with this reading list

No Notes From Underground? Is outrage!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: dantxny on January 13, 2007, 07:00:00 PM
Currently Reading,
Confederates in the Attic by Tony Horwitz

It's a very interesting book.  Although, I think the author sometimes underines the viewpoint of some of the pro-Southern people (which I am sympathetic to) it is an entertaining book and interesting to read how people remember the War between the States.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Νεκτάριος on January 13, 2007, 07:10:31 PM
Quote
No Notes From Underground?

I don't get all the fuss over Notes from the Underground.  I enjoyed reading it, but I much preferred what I've read of the mentioned novels.  I understand its importance as one of the founding documents of existentialism...but still. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on January 13, 2007, 07:18:06 PM
I dunno, it's one of my favorite books (not just by Dostoevsky, but generally). I thought The Idiot was a bit of a soap opera, and didn't really get the attraction of the Brothers K either (even though I was Orthodox when I read it). Besides, Notes is a small book (the online version I found was less than 45,000 words, which could be finished in one night's reading), so you get a lot of Dostoevsky bang in a short period. Ok, I guess I'm biased  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GiC on January 13, 2007, 08:12:38 PM
Currently Reading,
Confederates in the Attic by Tony Horwitz

It's a very interesting book.  Although, I think the author sometimes underines the viewpoint of some of the pro-Southern people (which I am sympathetic to) it is an entertaining book and interesting to read how people remember the War between the States.

It was a great book, and I thought Tony Horwitz to be more fair that I had initially expected. He generally keept the perspective as that of an outsider looking in, rarely being openly hostile to southern and confederate culture. Well, that's at least how I remember the book, though it's been years since I read it.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: dantxny on January 14, 2007, 12:52:52 PM
It was a great book, and I thought Tony Horwitz to be more fair that I had initially expected. He generally keept the perspective as that of an outsider looking in, rarely being openly hostile to southern and confederate culture. Well, that's at least how I remember the book, though it's been years since I read it.

No you are definitly right, and it's hard to put it down.  I mean it is obvious he is a Unionist with said perspective, but he at least tries to understand.  I also found it interesting how he took the comparison to the Irish, Sebia, Palestine, etc.  Of course, I don't totally buy his conclusion, but he is afterall a Yank. ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on January 18, 2007, 09:58:06 AM
Several things that I hadn't in a long time since we put up some more shelving and some stacks and boxes of books could be put on them. (and there's still more space and some standards and brackets to put up *more* so I'm hoping to get all the books shelved  mwa-ha-ha). Bridge of Birds by Barry Hughart was one (an excellent story set in "A China that Never Was"), Isabella Bird's book on travelling in Japan in the late 1800's (as a lone English woman with guides) are among them.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aserb on January 22, 2007, 10:38:53 AM
Just picked up Rasputin's Daughter
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on January 22, 2007, 04:50:21 PM
Just picked up Rasputin's Daughter

Just finished "Artemis Fowl and the Lost Colony"; an enjoyable read.

Now, I'm reading "Evolution" by Edward J. Larson. Only 41 pages into the book, but it's very interesting so far.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on February 21, 2007, 09:24:06 AM
In the last week I have re-read Eragon and Eldest, as well as Shogun
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on February 21, 2007, 10:56:39 AM
In the last week I have re-read Eragon and Eldest, as well as Shogun

You read all 3 in one week!  I am having feelings of book envy right now.  What a luxury to have the time to read that much.  I am usually reading 4 or 5 books at one time but never seem to make much headway.  That's the problem with working - it just seems to get in the way of my personal life.   Reading bit-by-bit right now - The 2006 Best American Non-Required Reading Series; Here, Bullet (poetry); Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire (rereading the series before Book 7); City Lights Pocket Poets Anthology; and The Mountain of Silence.

A book I have been recommending to everyone I can is Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susannah Clarke.  Absolutely fabulous.  Magical realism/alternate history set during the Napoleonic Wars when two wizards try to revive the practice of English Magic. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on February 21, 2007, 11:14:05 AM
Let's see.

I'm about halfway through "VampireSlayer: a Gotrek and Felix novel" by William King.  On deck from the public library are "The Prestige" by Christopher Priest (I never got to see the movie, so I'll read the book instead!), "Sharpe's Fury" by Bernard Cornwell, and "The Seventh Storey Mountain" by Thomas Merton.

Those are all on the backburner, though, as I read through the Ladder of Divine Ascent during Lent.  For the time being, they'll probably end up as "bathroom reading".

And I definitely have to get that Jonathan Strange novel, Tina.  You're the fourth or fifth person who has recommended it!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on February 21, 2007, 03:33:25 PM
You read all 3 in one week!  I am having feelings of book envy right now.  What a luxury to have the time to read that much. 

I was really sick with the flu... :-[

I will probably do the HP books again right before the release, I already have my copies on order.  I think I'll see if the library has that J Strange book too, sounds very interesting.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on February 21, 2007, 04:57:41 PM
Sisterhood of Spies: the Women of the OSS which a cousin gave me because her father is mentioned in it.  A fascinating book at a quite remarkable set of people.  (I need to look for a biography of Donovan who formed the OSS.); Modern poetry for a class I'm taking (Ferlinghetti is much better then Ginsberg imho); I just got a book on faith in Tolkien's works.  Now that I have more shelves put up, I'm able to get more books shelved so there's easy viewing and access. (heheheh)

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on February 21, 2007, 06:12:54 PM
I will probably do the HP books again right before the release, I already have my copies on order. 

I don't want to sound like a total geek, but I have never been so excited about a book release - ever.  I have this total plan already mapped out for the weekend that Harry Potter Book 7 is released.  Pick up book at midnight July 21st.  Do not begin reading it.  Wake up Saturday and drive 1 1/2 hours north of San Antonio to the little Hill Country German town of Fredericksburg (aka the Bed & Breakfast capital of Texas).  Check into the Hoffman Haus Inn, lock myself into the beautiful Ivy Cottage w/ sunken tub and private patio and read for 2 1/2 days, only emerging for  meals at a few local upscale restaurants and massages at a day spa.  No husband, no kids.  I repeat - no husband and no kids.  Just a good book.  Ahhhh, heaven on earth. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on February 22, 2007, 12:32:51 AM
WOW Tina, that does sound like a kind of heaven-on-earth set-up for the HP7 release. :) I'm not exactly sure where I'll be when it comes out, except that I'll have a copy of it in my hands either at midnight or early the next morning, and I will devote my every free moment to it...HP6 I read from about 10am that Saturday until maybe midnight Saturday evening, taking breaks only for a little eating, Vigil, and bathroom. I was in a summer semester of undergrad at the time though, so I don't think I'll have that kinda free time this time around! My priest was at the All American Council in Canada that weekend, and had HP6 in his possession but purposefully didn't start reading until after the week-long event because he knew if he did he wouldn't have left his hotel room for any of the meetings or workshops! :-D

As for what I'm reading now: Orthodox Lent: Journey to Pascha by Fr. Alexander Shmemann, Crossroads of Twilight by Robert Jordan (rereading, trying to get to Knife of Dreams)...that's actually it at the moment, surprisingly enough. :)

Donna
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aserb on February 22, 2007, 05:11:20 PM
Finished Rasputin's Daughter  It was a gripping mystery novel which although fiction based on fact helped shed light on the last days of Rasputin as seen through his eldest daughter's eyes. At the end of the book it has an historical timeline of the last days of Czarist Russia and of Rasputin. COuld not put his one down.

I am moving on to The Collaborator of Bethlehem. Another fiction based on fact novel by Matt Benyon Rees.  Bought it after listening to an interview with the author on NPR.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Krysostomos on April 05, 2007, 05:18:15 AM
Still reading The Orthodox Way by Kallistos Ware. Pretty heavy stuff - but interesting.
Someone once said, that this book was the final reason for him to join the orthodox church...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on April 05, 2007, 06:09:24 AM
The Blind Watchmaker: Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe Without Design, by Richard Dawkins
Why Darwin Matters: The Case Against Intelligent Design, by Michael Shermer

Just a coincidence that I'm reading two books on the same subject. We have sort of a small library here, so you take what you can get.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on April 05, 2007, 11:05:37 AM
Oh can I please come with you Tina?  That sounds fantastic.

Last release my kids and I went to pick it up at the mall, where they were having some fun things for the kids.  We got home, my oldest and I got our copies out and camped out reading until we couldn't keep our eyes open anymore.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aserb on April 17, 2007, 12:11:27 PM
Quotations From Chairman Mao TseTung


"Every Communist must grasp the truth, "Political power grows out of the barrel of a gun.""
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Justinian on April 19, 2007, 04:28:32 PM
I am currently trying to complete the Radcliffe List so I may become a *new orleans accent* "literary man of the upmost refinement." :D

I just finshed "Lolita" by Nabokov,*shudders*, and now I am working through "The Great Gatsby" by Fitzgerald.

Radcliffe List: http://www.cnn.com/books/news/9807/22/radcliffe.list/list.html (http://www.cnn.com/books/news/9807/22/radcliffe.list/list.html)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on April 19, 2007, 05:45:20 PM
Oh can I please come with you Tina?  That sounds fantastic.

It's kinda funny because my mother is almost scandalized - she can't understand why I would want to go off for a weekend away and she keeps asking what my husband thinks of this.  I know it's not the right Christian attitude towards marriage, but after 23 years and never a girl's weekend away, I really don't care what he thinks of it!  I wish I'd started this tradition with the first Harry Potter book instead of the last. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Trudy on April 19, 2007, 06:19:15 PM
This is a great thread!   ;D I can see I'll have to read all 26 pages to pick out some new things to read...after I read the pile that is beside my chair!

Currently I am reading We Shall See Him As He Is by Blessed Fr. Sophrony.  I just finished reading Herbert Hoover's The Challenge to Liberty.  I'm a history major.  (7 page paper is due tomorrow morning!)

On deck is St. Silouan the Athonite, also by Blessed Fr. Sophrony.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Justinian on May 05, 2007, 01:10:55 AM
This is a great thread!   ;D I can see I'll have to read all 26 pages to pick out some new things to read...after I read the pile that is beside my chair!

Currently I am reading We Shall See Him As He Is by Blessed Fr. Sophrony.  I just finished reading Herbert Hoover's The Challenge to Liberty.  I'm a history major.  (7 page paper is due tomorrow morning!)

On deck is St. Silouan the Athonite, also by Blessed Fr. Sophrony.

History major eh? Moi aussi! What are your research interests?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: dantxny on May 05, 2007, 01:45:59 AM
Well, I just finished a book on current French culture, but the title has slipped my mind.

Now, I am jumping across the Channel and reading Persuasion by Jane Austen.  Very good so far.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on May 05, 2007, 01:51:43 AM
I'm reading Christ the Eternal Tao.
I thought it was about time I read it.
It seems to be one of those "everyone's read it" books in contemporary Orthodoxy.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Justinian on May 05, 2007, 01:55:38 AM
I'm reading Christ the Eternal Tao.
I thought it was about time I read it.
It seems to be one of those "everyone's read it" books in contemporary Orthodoxy.

George, that book is sooooooooooooo 1990's, you gotta get with the program...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PeterTheAleut on May 05, 2007, 01:55:55 AM
Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0:  Application Development Foundation Self-Paced Training Kit

What can I say?  I'm a GEEK!  :D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on May 05, 2007, 02:03:43 AM
George, that book is sooooooooooooo 1990's, you gotta get with the program...

LOL :D
The publishing info says: "First edition 1999"....Goodness! I'm reading a book from last century! It almost qualifies as an ancient Patristic work! :D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Justinian on May 05, 2007, 02:06:56 AM
LOL :D
The publishing info says: "First edition 1999"....Goodness! I'm reading a book from last century! It almost qualifies as an ancient Patristic work! :D


I correct myself.
SOOOOOO LATE 1990's, you gotta get with the program!

Actually I read it in 2005, but I'm allowed to be inconsistent... :D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Elisha on May 05, 2007, 03:00:11 AM
Defeating Jihad by Serge Trifkovic.  Great book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: JSOrthodoxy on May 08, 2007, 02:19:09 PM
I just finished reading Dostoevsky's "Brothers Karamozov."  Now, I am reading Dostoevsky's "Crime and Punishment" and Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World."

In my amateur opinion, the Brothers K. is the greatest novel that I have ever read.

Joe
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: AMM on May 08, 2007, 02:26:21 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Civilization-Europe-Renaissance-John-Rigby/dp/0684803526
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on May 08, 2007, 02:49:05 PM
Norman Cantor's In the Wake of the Plague: The Black Death and the World It Made
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on May 08, 2007, 02:54:00 PM
"Get in the Van" by Henry Rollins
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BJohnD on May 10, 2007, 05:09:07 PM
The Historical Road of Eastern Orthodoxy, by Fr. Schmemann.  I recently re-read Crime and Punishment, which I enjoyed much, much more than I did when I read it for the first time about 15 years ago.  My priest opined that it's because I now get the "Orthodox liturgical mindset."

I have Gogol's Dead Souls next in the queue.  The little bio blurb at the front of my Penguin edition says he "came under the influence" of a Spiritual Father at the end of his life who told him to burn his works, as they were sinful.  He did so, including the second part of Dead Souls.  According to the same blurb, he died as the result of "severe fasting."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Trudy on May 14, 2007, 11:29:15 PM
History major eh? Moi aussi! What are your research interests?

Hi Justinian,

My research interests are primarily church history centered.  If I had nothing but free time on my hands, I would spend my time tracing the timeline and practical development of the Early Church in the first 200 years.  I also have an interest in the development of monasticism but have done no reading or research in that area.  My time has been spent just getting the required history courses for the BA completed.  I have thoroughly enjoyed all the European history courses I've taken, as well as the history of the Reformation.  The best course I've taken was "History and Theology of Eastern Orthodoxy."

I have not decided whether I shall pursue an MA once I'm done the undergrad.  I am pushing 50, so don't know if it would be worth it.  One of my profs suggested I push through to the Ph.D.  I mean...what in the world would I do with them?! 

I love learning for the sake of learning and have no agenda for the degree.  I hope to move onto a place where I can study Greek so that I might read the early texts in the original language.

Thanks for asking. 

What are your interests?

Athanasia
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on May 17, 2007, 12:20:10 PM
Just finished C.J. Cherryh's "Deliverer" an SF book.

I have an interesting volume from the library on over 100 books that have been banned or challenged and some of the reasons why. 

"Sisterhood of Spies" - a look at the OSS and some of the woman who were vital to it's functioning in WWII.  Julia Child was one; there's a photo of her in the book.

"Brilliance of the Moon" by Lian Hearne an Alt-history in medieval Japan

and others.  ;D

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 18, 2007, 11:30:19 AM
Fr. Schmemann's "Eucharist: The Sacrament of the Kingdom."

Before that, I re-read Flaubert's "Madame Bovary." What an amazing book, I almost literally cry every time I get to the end.

BJohnD, good luck in reading Gogol (actually, the correct spelling should be Hohol, soft "breathing" vocal "h," like in English "down the *H*ill," etc., like the sound transliterated by the Greek "gamma" - he was Ukrainian... Aggggggh, Russians perverted both the sound and the spelling of our Ukrainian names!!!! :)). I never read him in English, can't even imagine reading him in any language other than Russian, same thing as Tolstoy. Dostoevskiy is a different story, his Russian is so weird that he might actually be received even better in translations. :)

George
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: coptic orthodox boy on May 19, 2007, 07:27:01 PM
Currently reading

Chiang Kai-Shek: China's Generalissimo and the Nation He Lost by Jonathon Fenby

Various works for my Chinese 311 class in The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature by Joseph S. M. Lau and Howard Goldblatt

Also, Matthew the Poor's Orthodox Prayer Life: The Interior Way

Shawn
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on May 20, 2007, 01:28:07 AM

 I'm fixin' to start 'The Path to Salvation' by St. Theophan the Recluse. I hear it's really good but kind of difficult.

 I enjoyed 'Life After Death' by Metropolitan of Nafpaktos, Hierotheos Vlakos. It's really good but also scary. He has a whole chapter devoted to the Latins' teaching on Purgatory and the Orthodox refutation of it.

 My favorite Orthodox book thus far is 'Mountain of Silence' by Kyriacos Markides. This is the book that helped me become Orthodox.

 My all time favorite fictional book is 'Canary Row' by John Steinbeck. He can really tell a story. I love this little book so much that, for me, it transcends mere words.

 I enjoyed 'The Brothers Karamazov' by Dostoyevsky, but it is really long.

 I also enjoy anything on the Balkans; particularly Croatia, Serbia, Albania, Bulgaria, and Romania. I am at once in love with and scared to death of those folks.

 Gabriel
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on May 20, 2007, 01:51:15 AM
I also enjoy anything on the Balkans; particularly Croatia, Serbia, Albania, Bulgaria, and Romania. I am at once in love with and scared to death of those folks.

With good reason.   :P  My fiancee's mother is a Bosnian Serb and I am still scared to death of her.   :D ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. David on May 20, 2007, 02:21:50 AM
Flannery O'Connor's Everything That Rises Must Converge (http://www.amazon.com/Everything-That-Rises-Must-Converge/dp/0374504644)

The Art of Prayer (http://www.amazon.com/Art-Prayer-Orthodox-Anthology/dp/0571191657/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-9324786-4769724?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1179642020&sr=1-1)

Unseen Warfare (http://www.amazon.com/Unseen-Warfare-Spiritual-Paradise-Lorenzo/dp/0913836524/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-9324786-4769724?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1179642052&sr=1-1)

Michael Shaara's Killer Angels (http://www.amazon.com/Killer-Angels-Michael-Shaara/dp/0345348109/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-9324786-4769724?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1179642079&sr=1-2)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on May 20, 2007, 02:37:47 AM
With good reason.   :P  My fiancee's mother is a Bosnian Serb and I am still scared to death of her.   :D ;)

 Say no more.  ;) I'm getting used to the fact that everyone from the Balkans has a built-in microphone w/ two buttons; Loud and LOUDER. :'( ;) It used to be that almost everyone of our conversations started out with her saying, "Sweet-heart, you weel know whayn I am yelleeng...." :o

 Gabriel
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on May 20, 2007, 08:18:35 AM
Quote
Unseen Warfare

I am reading this as well. I just got through the section on prayer -- I found it most enlightening and practical in many ways, which is something I often need when being instructed on prayer.

Also reading:

Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
Saint Innocent Apostle to America by Paul D. Garrett
Children of Hurin by J.R.R. Tolkien

And in case I haven't mentioned it here yet, I have begun the Great Reread of the Harry Potter series in time for the release of the 5th movie on July 13th and the 7th book on July 21st. :) :) :) So also:

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on May 20, 2007, 11:38:29 AM
Say no more.  ;) I'm getting used to the fact that everyone from the Balkans has a built-in microphone w/ two buttons; Loud and LOUDER. :'( ;) It used to be that almost everyone of our conversations started out with her saying, "Sweet-heart, you weel know whayn I am yelleeng...." :o

LoL!   :D

So true.  When people are naturally louder than Italians, I take notice.   :P ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on May 22, 2007, 01:07:56 AM

 Italians have to talk loud because they're usually having to talk over their Balkan neighbors :D I forgot to mention that I'm dating a girl from Romania :o

 Gabriel
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on May 22, 2007, 10:09:35 AM
Also reading:
Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
Saint Innocent Apostle to America by Paul D. Garrett
Children of Hurin by J.R.R. Tolkien
And in case I haven't mentioned it here yet, I have begun the Great Reread of the Harry Potter series in time for the release of the 5th movie on July 13th and the 7th book on July 21st. :) :) :) So also:

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling.


Donna Rose - How is the Children of Hurin going?  It was out of stock at Barnes & Noble for a while and I haven't picked it up yet.  More readable than the Silmarillion?

As for Harry Potter Book 7, I did it.  I booked a fabulous B & B for 2 nights at the gorgeous Rose Hill Manor.  My fantasy escape from whining kids, obligations and never-ending laundry has been set in motion.   Just me reading on a chaise lounge watching the sunset.  Now the only thing I'm wondering, how much of a total geek/loser am I going to look like in the highly romantic dining room surrounded by smoochy couples feeding each other tidbits like courting birds.  While I try and look casual drinking wine by myself, reading a book.  At least it's not a romance novel.    http://www.rose-hill.com/ (http://www.rose-hill.com/)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on May 22, 2007, 10:16:09 AM
Donna Rose - How is the Children of Hurin going?  It was out of stock at Barnes & Noble for a while and I haven't picked it up yet.  More readable than the Silmarillion?

Ack! You remind me that I need to try to get a copy of "The Children of Hurin".  I knew I'd forgotten something with class and kids and all.   What parts of the Silmarillion did you find difficult to read?

Quote
As for Harry Potter Book 7, I did it.  I booked a fabulous B & B for 2 nights at the gorgeous Rose Hill Manor.  My fantasy escape from whining kids, obligations and never-ending laundry has been set in motion.   Just me reading on a chaise lounge watching the sunset.  Now the only thing I'm wondering, how much of a total geek/loser am I going to look like in the highly romantic dining room surrounded by smoochy couples feeding each other tidbits like courting birds.  While I try and look casual drinking wine by myself, reading a book.  At least it's not a romance novel.    http://www.rose-hill.com/ (http://www.rose-hill.com/)

Cow-a-bunga!!  Congratulations to you on getting this plan to work.  :)  Drinking wine and reading a book sounds like a fine idea to me.   

That reminds me.. I need to make a pre-order at my little local bookstore for Volume 7...

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on May 22, 2007, 11:37:32 AM
 What parts of the Silmarillion did you find difficult to read?

Ebor

Actually the whole thing.  While I've reread the LOTR many many times, I have made several unsuccesful attempts to read The Silmarillion.  I think it's a book that requires a lot of undivided attention in order to slog through the names and history with a cross reference book.  As you might have figured out, there's not a lot of distraction free time in my house.  I think that's why I read & write so much poetry and short stories.  In fact, right now I'm reading a collection of the complete short novels of Chekhov.  (For an agnostic, he has always seemed more religious than he's given credit for.)

Tina
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 22, 2007, 11:52:28 AM
****now I'm reading a collection of the complete short novels of Chekhov.  (For an agnostic, he has always seemed more religious than he's given credit for.)

(GP) I agree with you, Tina. Chekhov is one of my all-time favorite writers. His plays are also wonderful.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: AMM on May 22, 2007, 12:31:26 PM
The Huntsman is an interesting story.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Donna Rose on May 22, 2007, 12:47:59 PM
Donna Rose - How is the Children of Hurin going?  It was out of stock at Barnes & Noble for a while and I haven't picked it up yet.  More readable than the Silmarillion?

As for Harry Potter Book 7, I did it.  I booked a fabulous B & B for 2 nights at the gorgeous Rose Hill Manor.  My fantasy escape from whining kids, obligations and never-ending laundry has been set in motion.   Just me reading on a chaise lounge watching the sunset.  Now the only thing I'm wondering, how much of a total geek/loser am I going to look like in the highly romantic dining room surrounded by smoochy couples feeding each other tidbits like courting birds.  While I try and look casual drinking wine by myself, reading a book.  At least it's not a romance novel.    http://www.rose-hill.com/ (http://www.rose-hill.com/)

The Children of Hurin is going quite well. :) I'm working my way through it slowly, however it *is* more readable than the Silmarillion, in that it focuses on one single tale with a small handful of main characters, and so is more localized in that respect. I love the Silmarillion, but my favorite parts are the chapters or sections that really come together as tales of their own that could be excerpted from the work as a whole -- and The Children of Hurin is a novel-length version of this. There are definitely many names and history still in the book, however a manageable amount (and there is a relatively short appendix of names and descriptions as well as a fold out map of Beleriand, both of which I use frequently). Anyway, thus far I highly recommend it as a great addition to your Tolkien library. :)

As for your 2 night B & B Harry Potter 7 getaway...I think I said this when you first told us about this tradition of yours, but WOW I wish I were you and could afford to do that! As it stands, I am actually working all day on Saturday, July 21st :::sigh::: however I'll be on the Bookmobile where I'm allowed to read if I want, and you can guess what it is I'll be reading... :)

Donna
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: The young fogey on May 22, 2007, 12:53:52 PM
Starting with what I'm reading now and going backwards:

Departures by Harry Turtledove: Good science fiction, alternative history that teaches much real history while it entertains:

    * What if Athens lost to the Persians? (Democracy? What’s that?)
    * What if Muhammad had converted as a young man and ended up a charismatic Orthodox monk composing hymns?
    * Or what if Constantinople and the rest of the eastern Roman Empire fell early on to the Muslims and Bulgaria (and thus the rest of the Slavonic world) ended up Muslim and not Christian?

And more!  ;D

Changing Places by David Lodge. Novel about two literature professors, one English from Birmingham, the other American from San Francisco, in a teacher exchange during the swinging spring of 1969.

The Liar. Stephen 'Jeeves' Fry's first novel, about a roguish public schoolboy and Cambridge student in a spy plot. Very English, camp and gay like its author.

Angela's Ashes. Frank McCourt's Pulitzer-winning first book, an autobiography about growing up in the slums of Limerick, Ireland in the 1930s and 1940s.

The Sum of All Fears, a Tom Clancy number from 1991. Entertaining yarn: Black Sunday with nukes. An advantage of not seeing the movies: my Jack Ryan doesn't look like Harrison Ford or Ben Affleck.

An advantage of taking commuter trains to work instead of driving is I make time to read books again.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 22, 2007, 01:28:06 PM
Welkodox - do you mean a short story about the village hunter (Yegor) who meets his wife (Pelageya) with whom he does not live, and she begs him to return? In the Russian original, it's called "Yeger'"... Yes, it's a gem, one of the shortest short novels by Chekhov, tremendously deep in fact, very humble, very humane...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: AMM on May 22, 2007, 01:31:54 PM
Welkodox - do you mean a short story about the village hunter (Yegor) who meets his wife (Pelageya) with whom he does not live, and she begs him to return? In the Russian original, it's called "Yeger'"... Yes, it's a gem, one of the shortest short novels by Chekhov, tremendously deep in fact, very humble, very humane...

Yes.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 22, 2007, 01:41:21 PM
My favorite short novels by Chekhov are "The House with a Mezzanine" (what an indictment of cruelty of human beings involved in "charity" "projects," among other things), "Lady with a Dog," "Ionych," "Van'ka" (or "Van'ka Zhukov" - this one is perhaps not conveyed well in translations, it needs to be read in Russian), "Gooseberries," and a number of others (I'll recall their titles and plots if I just glance at their first paragraph). But I really do admire his plays, "Sea Gull," "Uncle Vanya," and "Cherry Orchard."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: recent convert on May 22, 2007, 02:07:16 PM
Mary Queen of Scots by Antonia Fraser and Centuries writings of St Maximos the confessor (Philokalia vol. II).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on May 22, 2007, 02:24:55 PM
As for your 2 night B & B Harry Potter 7 getaway...I think I said this when you first told us about this tradition of yours, but WOW I wish I were you and could afford to do that! As it stands, I am actually working all day on Saturday, July 21st :::sigh::: however I'll be on the Bookmobile where I'm allowed to read if I want, and you can guess what it is I'll be reading... :)

Donna

Working on a Bookmobile sounds like a dream job.  I have very fond memories of Bookmobiles.  If you want to read a totally amazing short story, try searching for The Night Bookmobile by Audrey Niffenegger.  It was published through Zoetrope's All Story, or read on Symphony Space's Selected Shorts program on NPR.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on May 22, 2007, 02:53:16 PM
Actually the whole thing.  While I've reread the LOTR many many times, I have made several unsuccesful attempts to read The Silmarillion.  I think it's a book that requires a lot of undivided attention in order to slog through the names and history with a cross reference book. 

Been a while since I've posted...of course, there's nothing to get me back posting than a conversation about Middle-Earth/Tolkien! :)

When reading the Silmarillion, it really pays to take into account that it is an entirely different kind of story than LOTR in a number of ways.  LOTR is more of a chronicle while the Silmarillion (and the rest of the Tolkien Middle-Earth corpus in general) are more "legendary" in nature.  The events in LOTR were written in a style that is far more accessible to most readers of novels (particularly novels in the English language) than the Silmarillion, whose style harkens back to the legend tales of, say, the Kalevala. 

It also pays to take into account that LOTR was, for the most part, a product finished and finalized by Tolkien himself, while the Silmarillion was never truly finished.  The good Professor was, it is true, never fully satisfied with the final edits of LOTR, but the Silmarillion was a work in progress up to his death.  His son and editor Christopher will be the first to tell you that the published Silmarillion is his interpretation of where his father was headed based upon the boxes and boxes of manuscripts left behind in the wake of the author's passing.  However, it is almost fitting that there is no real final, set-in-stone draft of the stories of the Silmarillion.  As the legends of our own "real" ancestors were never static, nor are the stories of the ancestors of the Eldar and Edain as told by Tolkien.

I have also found that it really helps to either read the Silmarillion aloud the first time or invest in the excellent unabridged audiobook version and just sit and listen to the stories.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on May 22, 2007, 05:55:53 PM

I have also found that it really helps to either read the Silmarillion aloud the first time or invest in the excellent unabridged audiobook version and just sit and listen to the stories.


Good suggestion on listening through the Silmarillion as an audiobook.  I think I get weighed down flipping back and forth with an appendix trying to get names and history down in my head as I go.  If I could just listen to the whole thing at one time it would be easier to go back and read it.  Thanks for the tip Schultz
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on May 22, 2007, 06:34:18 PM
Italians have to talk loud because they're usually having to talk over their Balkan neighbors :D I forgot to mention that I'm dating a girl from Romania :o

LoL!  We are just jovial and enthusiastic in the South, that is all.    ;) :D

Back on topic, I just started Edward Muir's Mad Blood Stirring: Vendetta And Factions In Friuli During The Renaissance.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BJohnD on May 22, 2007, 08:12:21 PM
BJohnD, good luck in reading Gogol (actually, the correct spelling should be Hohol, soft "breathing" vocal "h," like in English "down the *H*ill," etc., like the sound transliterated by the Greek "gamma" - he was Ukrainian... Aggggggh, Russians perverted both the sound and the spelling of our Ukrainian names!!!! :)). I never read him in English, can't even imagine reading him in any language other than Russian, same thing as Tolstoy. Dostoevskiy is a different story, his Russian is so weird that he might actually be received even better in translations. :)

George

Thanks -- If it's really good, I suppose (as the saying goes) that will mean it's a bad translation.  ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Νεκτάριος on May 22, 2007, 10:34:20 PM
Quote
(actually, the correct spelling should be Hohol, soft "breathing" vocal "h," like in English "down the *H*ill," etc., like the sound transliterated by the Greek "gamma" - he was Ukrainian... Aggggggh, Russians perverted both the sound and the spelling of our Ukrainian names!!!! ).

Would somebody like Гоголь, (I'll avoid creating a transliteration altogether!) who was very russified used the Muscovite pronunciation in favor of a lower prestige pronunciation? 

I'm having my own problems with Russians butchering my Polish name on my visa for this summer's travels - is it that hard to realize that io = ё not ио or that zi = ж and not зи !  And when I go through Ukraine who knows what trouble I'll run into speaking Russian and no Ukrainian! 

To keep this on topic, I just finished up Eugene Onegin (James Falen translation) and am working through An Anthology of Russian Literature compiled by Nicholas Rzhevsky.  Both of which are good as far as translations go.     

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 23, 2007, 09:31:45 AM
Hi Nektarios (sorry, I don't know how to use the Greek alphabet in this forum format!),

"Eugene Onegin" is such a bliss... Again, I, having grown up in the former USSR, read it in its original Russian and cannot even imagine reading it in any translation. "Blazhen, kto s molodu byl molod, blazhen, kto voremya sozrel, kto postepenno zhizni kholod s godami vyterpet' sumel, kto sladkim snam ne predavalsya, kto cherni svetskoj ne chuzhdalsya, kto v dvadtsat' let byl frant il' khvat, a v tridtsat' - vygodno zhenat, kto v pyatdesyat osvobodilsya ot chastnykh i drugikh dolgov, kto slavy, deneg i chinov spokojno v ochered' dobilsya; o kom tverdili tselyj vek: "NN - prekrasnyj chelovek!"" How CAN this even be translated??? :) :) :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: AMM on May 23, 2007, 09:36:49 AM
There are people who say it cannot be properly.

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/12829
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 23, 2007, 09:51:43 AM
I have a feeling that Lev Tolstoy also simply cannot be translated... I have an English translation of "War and Peace" at home - it's so useless, such a gibberish... sorry. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. David on May 24, 2007, 12:20:02 AM
Departures by Harry Turtledove: Good science fiction, alternative history that teaches much real history while it entertains:

I.  Love.  Turtledove.  Primarily the USA/CSA series, but the fact that he's into Byzantine history, BIG time, is also wonderful for me!  That book sounds incredible!  Will have to see if I can check it out from the library system here...

Good suggestion on listening through the Silmarillion as an audiobook.

Speaking of these--my wife and I have already put ourselves on the library waiting list (and it's a LONG one already) for the audiobook of HP7.  Yes, we're going to wait.  A toddler and a soon-coming newborn (God willing) necessitate it...

I have a feeling that Lev Tolstoy also simply cannot be translated... I have an English translation of "War and Peace" at home - it's so useless, such a gibberish... sorry. :)

If y'all'll pardon the culture shift here, another person whose work I absolutely cannot stand to read in English is Pablo Neruda.  His poetry, imo, loses ALL passion, ALL beauty when it is taken out of the original Spanish.  When left in and breathed through in the original language, it is breathtaking.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Νεκτάριος on May 24, 2007, 01:22:02 AM
Quote
Blazhen, kto s molodu byl molod, blazhen, kto voremya sozrel, kto postepenno zhizni kholod s godami vyterpet' sumel, kto sladkim snam ne predavalsya, kto cherni svetskoj ne chuzhdalsya, kto v dvadtsat' let byl frant il' khvat, a v tridtsat' - vygodno zhenat, kto v pyatdesyat osvobodilsya ot chastnykh i drugikh dolgov, kto slavy, deneg i chinov spokojno v ochered' dobilsya; o kom tverdili tselyj vek: "NN - prekrasnyj chelovek!

This is what I love about Eastern Europeans, they can all bust out into poetry (and stanza after stanza after stanza) from memory.  Most American school kids probably coudn't even name five poets.

Quote
There are people who say it cannot be properly.

If you really want to get a Russian professor going all you have to do ask which translation of Pushkin is the best.  Even better is getting a few together who disagree. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 24, 2007, 09:14:23 AM
Thank you, Nektarios... yes, that's our habit, instilled in childhood... Most people who grew up in the former USSR and in the so-called Eastern Block, when asked about their favorite poetry, indeed can almost always recite stanza after stanza, non-stop, from memory. For many of my friends and myself, it's enough to "trigger" the opening, "Moj dyadya samykh chestnykh pravil, kogda ne v shutku zanemog..." - and we will continue the entire first chapter of Eugene Onegin by heart. I can probably recite about 1/4 of the entire novel (Pushkin insisted that "Onegin" is a NOVEL in verse, not a "poem"), or maybe even 1/3.

To me, Pushkin is a shining example of true humility. In "Onegin" and in many other works, he shows such a wonderful, soft, kind irony of the human nature (albeit sometimes a "peppered" kind of irony, too). Like in these two stanzas that directly follow the one I quoted yesterday,

"No grustno dumat', chto naprasno byla nam molodost' dana; chto izmenyali ej vsechasno; chto izmenila nam ona; chto pylkikh let neostorozhnost' samolyubivuju nichtozhnost' il' oskorblyaet, il' smeshit; chto um, lyubya prostor, tesnit; chto slishkom chasto razgovory my prinyat' rady za dela; chto glupost' vetrena i zla; chto vazhnym lyudyam vazhny vzdory, i chto posredstvennost' odna nam po plechu i ne stranna?

Kogo zh lyubit'? komu zhe verit'? kto ne izmenit nam odin? kto vse dela, vse rechi merit usluzhlivo na nash arshin? kto suety sred' nas ne seet? kto nas zabotlivo leleet? komu porok nash ne beda? kto ne naskuchit nikogda? Prizraka suetnyj iskatel'! trudov naprasno ne gubya, lyubite samogo sebya, dostopochtennyj moj chitatel'! Predmet dostojnyj: nikogo milee, pravo, net ego..."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on May 29, 2007, 10:16:20 AM
This is what I love about Eastern Europeans, they can all bust out into poetry (and stanza after stanza after stanza) from memory.  

Stop me before I recite "The Highwayman"  or Robert Frost or Lewis Carroll!  ;D :D

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on May 29, 2007, 10:21:41 AM
I've been reading "120 Banned Books: Censorship Histories of World Literature" - by Nicholas J. Karolides, Margaret Bald and Dawn B. Sova.  It's fascinating finding out why some works have been suppressed, burned, or the authors persecuted.  It has sections on books banned for Political, Religious, Sexual and Social Grounds and includes books from a number of countries. 

My 14 y.o. picked it up after finding out that "Harry Potter" was listed and started going through it. He was astounded and shocked at some of the reasons and cases and books that were suppressed.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 29, 2007, 01:05:06 PM
Stop me before I recite "The Highwayman"  or Robert Frost or Lewis Carroll!  ;D :D

Ebor

You know, I could never really "feel" poetry written by English-speaking authors. Not one single Brit "gets" me except Shakespeare. Poe maybe. Emily Dickinson - I "rationally" realize that she is a great master of poetry, but I do not "feel" her the way I feel Pushkin or Shevchenko. Edwin Arlington Robinson. Frost - some. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on May 29, 2007, 01:26:22 PM
You know, I could never really "feel" poetry written by English-speaking authors. Not one single Brit "gets" me except Shakespeare. Poe maybe. Emily Dickinson - I "rationally" realize that she is a great master of poetry, but I do not "feel" her the way I feel Pushkin or Shevchenko. Edwin Arlington Robinson. Frost - some. 

My fiancee loved John Keats works, have you looked much into him?  Personally, I find the works of Count Giacomo Leopardi to be absolutely amazing, though some find him too pessemistic for their tastes.   :P
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 29, 2007, 01:31:36 PM
My fiancee loved John Keats works, have you looked much into him?  Personally, I find the works of Count Giacomo Leopardi to be absolutely amazing, though some find him too pessemistic for their tastes.   :P

No, Friul, not much... tried a little (when my daughter studied Keats in high school and then in college), but his poetry did not "get" me in the slightest, sorry, I just yawned... maybe I should try more. As for Leopardi, no, I do not know him at all.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on May 29, 2007, 01:43:36 PM
As for Leopardi, no, I do not know him at all.

He and Evgeny Baratynsky are often compared to each other for their style of Poetry.

Leopardi's works are obviously all in Italian, but they have some translations out there.  Changing the language you lose a bit (sometimes a lot), but you can get a general feel to his style and outlook.  English (http://www.tonykline.co.uk/klineasleopardi.htm)  Italian (http://www.leopardi.it/canti.php)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 29, 2007, 02:07:23 PM
Thank you so much for the links, Friul. Oh yes, of course I know Baratynsky. --G.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on June 01, 2007, 10:01:17 AM
You know, I could never really "feel" poetry written by English-speaking authors. Not one single Brit "gets" me except Shakespeare. Poe maybe. Emily Dickinson - I "rationally" realize that she is a great master of poetry, but I do not "feel" her the way I feel Pushkin or Shevchenko. Edwin Arlington Robinson. Frost - some. 

That's very interesting that you like Robinson.  I don't think he's as much read as he once was, though "Richard Corey" and "Miniver Cheevy" show up in anthologies sometimes still.  What are your favourites of his works, if one may ask?

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on June 01, 2007, 10:02:51 AM
It's also probably ummm naughty to say, but while Emily Dickinson has some fine images in her poems, it's been stuck in my brain that most of her works can be sung to the tune of "The Yellow Rose of Texas"  ;D :D 

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on June 01, 2007, 12:16:43 PM
Greetings Ebor,

I like "John Evereldown," "Richard Cory," "Her Eyes." I never actually read a book by Robinson; the poems by him that I read are in the "Anthology of American Poetry," a large book we have at home.

G.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on June 03, 2007, 06:53:38 AM
It's been a while since I posted here. It seems like the reading has really slowed down for me this year. I've finally started on some new books in the past couple weeks, though...

Criticism and the Growth of Knowledge - Basically a book of critical lectures/essays examining Thomas Khun's ideas as expressed in the philosophy of science book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

The Uses of Argument, by Stephen Toulmin - Logic, rhetoric, all that good stuff.

Monkey Girl: Evolution, Education, Religion, and the Battle for America's Soul, by Edward Hume - About the recent Kitzmiller vs. Dover evolution/creationism court case.

The Unofficial Lego Builder's Guide, by Allan Bedford
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on June 03, 2007, 06:54:43 PM
My daughter visited us last week and, as usual, scolded me that I am behind in my reading. When she left yesterday, I tired to read "Flounder" by Gunter Grass, and... could not. Just too tired, cannot concentrate. Reading fiction becomes so difficult as I age, working... On the other hand, I became addicted to reading encyclopaedias. Recently, was reading an old USSR-printed "Literary Encyclopaedia" in Russian, esp. articles about the great mediaeval and early Rennaissance humanists (Pico della Mirandola, Ficcini).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on June 07, 2007, 11:09:36 AM
I got one of the Jim Butcher/ "Harry Dresden" mysteries at the library.  Not bad at all.  Good characterizations and plots.  Apparently there's not a serious on the SF Channel, but we don't have cable so I know nothing of it. 

I loved reading the encyclopedia when I was a kid/teenager George and I still do when I get the chance.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Eleos on June 07, 2007, 12:26:39 PM
I recently finished "Heart of Darkness" by Joseph Conrad, written about a century ago, was the original novel used as the model for the movie Apocalypse Now.  Its a very short book, but very heavy and put me in a strange mood for days after reading it (much like the movie does).  It is the same basic story as AN, but it is set in colonial Africa and centers on a british ivory trading company boat trip to the interior to solve a company problem (a mad megalomaniac of course).  Not light reading, but worthwhile.

Also recently finished "Diamond Age" by Neal Stephenson, entertaining sci-fi set in a future where internet commerce caused the breakdown of taxation systems and consequently large central governments.  Society is organized into self-governing Phyles - basically neo-tribes.  Online entertainment includes story books with virtual characters controlled remotely by work-for-hire actors.  Set in Shanghai, a fun read for sure.

Also just finished "Night" by Elie Wiesel, amazing memoirs of his experience in multiple Nazi concentration camps.  Excellent.

Also going through my St Maximos the Confessor writings as well, and patristic commentary on the Psalter.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on June 08, 2007, 11:24:46 AM
I recently finished "Heart of Darkness" by Joseph Conrad, written about a century ago, was the original novel used as the model for the movie Apocalypse Now. 

It was based on real experiences and the brutal treatment of African people under the Belgian control of the Congo.  There's some horrible, ugly history there.

I saw "Apocalypse Whenever" once in a theater with a huge screen.  Never need to see it again.  And the last part made no sense at all, but I'm not inclined to rent the new cut that I heard about. 

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on June 08, 2007, 07:38:48 PM
Prince Caspian by C.S. Lewis. Second in the Narnia series, despite what publishers seem to think. Not that I expect them to understand a series that was written in theological order. I expect they don't get too many bestsellers of that persuasion.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on June 11, 2007, 08:58:05 AM
"Sons and Lovers" by D.H. Lawrence. Heard a lot about this author but never read him. Very strong first impression. The style is somewhat nervous, but I feel his great compassion to women and men.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aserb on June 12, 2007, 10:21:38 PM
THis book if I remember "Sons & Lovers" is very anguishing. Isn't it the one were he's diggin' on this chick and every time he tries to hook up with her it is thwarted by his old man or something.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on June 13, 2007, 09:01:24 AM
THis book if I remember "Sons & Lovers" is very anguishing. Isn't it the one were he's diggin' on this chick and every time he tries to hook up with her it is thwarted by his old man or something.

Yes, sort of... It's more complex than that, of course, but you do convey the main idea. It's about one very unhappy family, where the mother is deeply frustrated and trapped in her marriage to a man who is way too primitive and incapable of loving her, and she becomes obsessed with one of her sons, and one of the sons becomes terribly hateful to his father, and a young lad dies of skin disease, etc. Not an easy reading, but one of those books that make you think, oh my God, what in the world is happening to people, why can't they just live their lives and be happy. In a way, it's like Flaubert's "Madame Bovary," but much more complicated and less "Victorian."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on June 14, 2007, 10:08:01 AM
I had two D.H. Lawrence short stories as assignments in a class I took a year ago.  He was a powerful writer.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on June 14, 2007, 10:37:34 AM
I just started Not Even My Name by Thea Halo.

Personal story of surviving the non-existent (according to the Turks) death march and genocide of Armenians and Greeks in Anatolia in the 1910-20s.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jonas Suender on June 15, 2007, 12:35:03 PM
I'm rereading "A Canticle for Leibowitz" by Walter Miller Jr. and "The Martian Chronicles" by Ray Bradbury. 

I'm also reading, from time to time at the bedside, Fr. Alexander Schmeman's "The Historical Road of Eastern Orthodoxy."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on June 15, 2007, 11:43:00 PM
I just started Not Even My Name by Thea Halo.
I loved it. Not only for being a firsthand account of the events, but also the very human way the story is told, and the very human level "micro-reconcilliation" which occurs towards the end.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Despina on June 16, 2007, 11:02:17 AM
A Short History of Byzantium by John Julius Norwich.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on June 16, 2007, 06:23:47 PM
Byzantine Rome and the Greek Popes by Dr. Andrew Ekonomou
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Despina on June 16, 2007, 07:36:19 PM
Byzantine Rome and the Greek Popes by Dr. Andrew Ekonomou


Is that discussing Greek Popes in the west or East (present-day patriarchs)?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on June 16, 2007, 09:50:44 PM

Is that discussing Greek Popes in the west or East (present-day patriarchs)?

It actually discuss the Eastern influences on the Papacy after the reconquest of Italy by St. Justinian until the collapse of the Exarchate of Ravenna.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: catechumen07 on June 23, 2007, 10:43:52 PM
I'm reading Quo Vadis by Henryk Sienkiewicz (sp?) and my catechism books (the Living God volumes).  And last week I read The Orthodox Way.  Praise the Lord for Bishop Ware!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on June 24, 2007, 09:43:28 AM
Praise the Lord for Bishop Ware!

Agreed. Everything I've read by him is fantastic writing, and very profound.

I'm reading Teacher Man by Frank McCourt. Apparently, I can't stay out of a classroom for more than a month without sorely missing it. Can't wait for August.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on June 24, 2007, 03:46:52 PM
Catechumen07, your spelling is correct! I love "Quo Vadis." My other favorite book by Sienkiewicz is "Knights of the Sword" (although it might have a different title in English translations - in the Russian translation that I read when I was young, the title was "Miechenostsy," literally "They who carry swords"). It's about the events surrounding the famous battle of Grunwald in the 15th century.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jonas Suender on June 24, 2007, 06:34:59 PM
I love "Quo Vadis."

So do I.  That was a good one !   :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Krysostomos on July 16, 2007, 02:01:00 PM
Reading "Marx`s Das Kapital - A Biography" by Francis Wheen. Marxin Pääoma - in Finnish.
The author writes on the back cover: "As long as the capitalistic system is ruiling the world, Das Kapital deserves to be read and understood."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on July 19, 2007, 11:50:10 AM
"Sweet Thursday" by J. Steinbeck. What a treat. Incredible humor, absolutely live characters, the main hero a total nerd like me. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on July 19, 2007, 11:57:49 AM
New book--The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C.S. Lewis.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on July 19, 2007, 12:09:50 PM
The Idiot - Dostoevsky - new translation by Prevear-Volokhonsky

To be followed by his Demons, same translators
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on July 19, 2007, 01:04:58 PM
Quote
New book--The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C.S. Lewis

Cool. That's my favorite of the Chronicles. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on July 19, 2007, 01:06:50 PM
Mine too. I've read that one more than any of the others.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on July 19, 2007, 01:56:24 PM
And last week I read The Orthodox Way.  Praise the Lord for Bishop Ware!
Amen to that! I read The Orthodox Way about three and a half years ago when I was I was looking into Orthodox Christianity but still heavily into Sufism/Hinduism. I absolutely loved it. It's one of the books that Christ used to gently 'push' me into the Church.

"Sweet Thursday" by J. Steinbeck. What a treat. Incredible humor, absolutely live characters, the main hero a total nerd like me. :)
Steinbeck is one of my favorite authors. I found Cannery Row shortly after leaving Islam and immediately loved it. For awhile there, I would take a few days every spring and read it while enjoying a nice cigar and *several* Jack n' Cokes.  :D Call it my 'secular Paskha' before becoming a Christian...

 At present time, I'm reading Christ the Eternal Tao. Several of you recommended it to me and I can say so far that I'm not disappointed. It's a very profound book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aserb on July 19, 2007, 09:05:34 PM
The City of Oranges by Anthony LeBor. It chronicles the formation of the modern state of Israel through the lives of several families both Arab and Jewish. So far it is very balanced.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: lubeltri on July 19, 2007, 09:27:24 PM
The Great Divorce by CS Lewis.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jonas Suender on July 20, 2007, 06:06:53 AM
Amen to that! I read The Orthodox Way about three and a half years ago when I was I was looking into Orthodox Christianity but still heavily into Sufism/Hinduism. I absolutely loved it. It's one of the books that Christ used to gently 'push' me into the Church.

I love that book, The Orthodox way by Bishop Kallistos Ware !


Quote
Steinbeck is one of my favorite authors.

 :)  I really enjoyed Steinbeck's writings when I was in high school and college.  A few years ago, I read East of Eden which was also quite good.


Quote
At present time, I'm reading Christ the Eternal Tao. Several of you recommended it to me and I can say so far that I'm not disappointed. It's a very profound book.

I will have to read Christ the Eternal Tao one of these days; I too have noticed that it is widely recommended.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jonas Suender on July 20, 2007, 06:07:25 AM
Currently, I'm forcing myself to finish a very unsatisfying work: Why Angels Fall by Victoria Clark.  She is a secularist (specifically, a non-practicing Catholic) from Britain who lived in Eastern Europe for several years; and she decided to write a book about Orthodoxy.  However, she neither believes in the religion nor does she treat Orthodoxy as a religion.  Instead of treating Orthodoxy as a spiritual system, she treats it as a political and cultural milieu.  Unsurprisingly, the book is fairly good at delivering the dirt about Orthodoxy in Eastern Europe  -- religious nationalism and anti-semitism--  but she utterly fails to communicate why people practice Orthodoxy:  because they believe in it, because it brings them into closer union with God!  The most she can say along those lines is "I wish I could believe like they do," which is actually rather poignant and sad.  So, I would not recommend this book: not because it is critical of Orthodoxy but because it fails to meaningfully consider and analyze Orthodoxy as a spiritual system for living one's life.   
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Punch on July 20, 2007, 08:51:25 AM
Currently reading "Windscale 1957".  Part of the research that I am doing for a book that I am working on.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Keble on July 21, 2007, 10:15:18 PM
HP VII, of course.

Actually,I finished about 6:15.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on July 22, 2007, 01:23:09 PM
I started on the first O'Brien "Aubrey/Maturin" book Master and Commanderearlier this week. 

But that was put aside for HP VII which I have finished.  What a ride!  No commentary or reviews for a few days until others have a chance to read it. 

I'm not going to do a "spoiler" like some of the persons who got the book early, including the New York Times and the Baltimore Sun.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on July 23, 2007, 09:27:03 AM
I got HP VII  delivered at about 9 am Saturday, and finished it by 3 or so.  Yes, I completely ignored my kids for six straight hours.  ;D

awesome wasnt it? And I also refuse to divulge anything, though I would love to once those who are reading it are done.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on July 27, 2007, 02:10:06 PM
"The Great Hoax of February" by I.L. Solonevich (in Russian, full text here: http://www.hrono.info/libris/lib_s/solonev00.html). A documentary about the last days of the Romanov dynasty, where the author claims, based on a huge factual material, that there was no "revolution" whatsoever in Russia of February 1917 - what toppled the Romanovs was, actually, a coup d'etat prepared by financial-industrialist tycoons like Guchkov, Ryabushinskiy, Morozov with a blessing of a part of the incumbent royal family itself (esp. the Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolayevich).

An amazing book, very challenging... The author, Ivan Lukyanovich Solonevich, was a senior correspondent of one of Russia's biggest newspapers, "Novoye Vremya," in 1916-1917. His responsibilities included writing and editing reports about the daily routine of the Russian imperial court, the "inner circle."

The above book was written in 1951, obviously when the author was already an old man, but the style is very vivid. Contains wonderful portraits of many prominent people of the time, particularly of Guchkov, count Vitte, Stolypin, the French Ambassador Maurice Paleologue and other.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on July 27, 2007, 02:19:26 PM
On Certainty, by Ludwig Wittgenstein - Looks to be an enjoyable-yet-insightful read.

God's Funeral, by A.N. Wilson. - I actually owned this book before, but never got around to reading it, and eventually gave it away. I really enjoyed Wilson's biography of Paul the Apostle, so hopefully I'll like this one as well.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SouthSerb99 on July 27, 2007, 04:22:12 PM
"Serbs:  Guardians of the Gate"  By RGD Laffan
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: lubeltri on July 27, 2007, 07:50:55 PM
The Two Cities: Medieval Europe, 1050-1300, by Malcolm Barber. I've owned the book more than three years (I rushed and had the brand-new second edition shipped from Blackwell's in the UK as the American version was not to come out until two months later). Needless to say, after all my rushing and excitement, I never got to it! I'm going to put things to rights, now.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on July 28, 2007, 01:22:29 PM
Happens to me quite often too. In fact, it's happening right now as I'm not reading Harry Potter; I'm instead reading The First Days of School by Harry & Rosemary Wong. I read it every year right before school starts.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on August 12, 2007, 07:54:45 AM
Your book intrigues me, YA. Would you tell us why you read that? Is it specifically for teachers? Or could it be useful for parents as well?  We have 3 with 1 starting High School, one starting Middle School and the youngest in Special Ed/School Community Based Program.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on August 12, 2007, 07:57:27 AM
The Great Divorce by CS Lewis.

So what did you think of this? 

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on August 12, 2007, 09:47:34 PM
Your book intrigues me, YA. Would you tell us why you read that? Is it specifically for teachers? Or could it be useful for parents as well?  We have 3 with 1 starting High School, one starting Middle School and the youngest in Special Ed/School Community Based Program.
It's a book about classroom management. I use it as a quickie refresher course. It discusses designing seating arrangements, giving assignments, taking roll, keeping records, establishing classroom procedures, etc.

Yeah, it's designed for teachers. It's basically about how to accomplish the clerical tasks with as little resistance from the students as possible. After all, those things are the part of teaching that is specifically for the teachers. Wong's idea is that if you can get these things out of the way quickly and easily, you can have more time and energy for the actual lessons and thus increase student learning.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on August 12, 2007, 09:49:16 PM
I've finally got time for Harry Potter; I've been reading it off and on all weekend. I report to the school tomorrow, though, so it may be a while before I finish.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on August 13, 2007, 12:01:14 PM
It's a book about classroom management.

Ah. Thank you.  Sometimes with my kids, I think I could use a book on oh... herding cats management, or cattle stampede management or how to instill conditioned reflexes to pick up their shoes.  ;)

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on August 15, 2007, 08:44:35 PM
I think I could use a book on oh... herding cats management

Yeah, I could use one of those two for our two wild cats.  One is a four year old tabby who thinks he's one hundred and four and the other is a four month old Siamese.  Talk about chaos at the homestead.

I'm currently reading The Life of the Virgin Mary The Theotokos and Shusaku Endo's The Sea and Poison.  Just finished Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows last week.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on August 16, 2007, 06:57:03 PM
I'm reading Harry Potter & the Deathly Hallows.  I'm on around page 620, I think.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on August 16, 2007, 07:05:44 PM
I'm reading Harry Potter & the Deathly Hallows.  I'm on around page 620, I think.


Why do adults read this stuff, isn't it for children?

No sarcasm intended, honestly.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on August 16, 2007, 07:09:09 PM
Because it's written so well, without talking down to kids, that even adults find it appealing.

The best way to understand is to read the first book.  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on August 16, 2007, 07:27:34 PM
Yeah, who are these adults that indulge in children's things?  ;D Sorry, couldn't resist.

As far as books go... compared to previous years, I've done very little reading in 2007 for some reason. I'll probably spend most of the rest of the year finishing off books that I've started over the last year and a half but never finished. A couple months ago I was reading Monkey Girl (about the 2005 Dover Intelligent Design case) by Edward Humes, and it was pretty enjoyable, so I'll finish that one next. I've been debating whether to start the Harry Potter books. I've not read one yet, but already have them all sitting on our shelves(because my wife loves them). On the other hand, if I'm gonna go for that genre, maybe I'll just reread LOTR, as I haven't read it in probably 5 years or more.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on August 16, 2007, 07:59:22 PM
As far as reading Harry Potter, it is geared toward children but there's enough meat in the story and characters that I really enjoy it.  J.K. Rowling is a great story teller, too, so she keeps you entertained.  Beyond that, she's well versed in English literature, mythology, and the mindset of children (she's a former teacher) so she draws on all of that to present probably the world's greatest series of books for kids and those of us who are still kids at heart.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on August 16, 2007, 08:25:38 PM
Why do adults read this stuff, isn't it for children?

No sarcasm intended, honestly.

A couple of thoughts.  While they are marketed as children's literature (or maybe the later books should be YA/Young Adult) that doesn't mean bad writing or simplisting stories. Tolkien's "The Hobbit" may have been intended as a 'children's book' but there is plenty there for adults to enjoy and millions upon millions of them do.  From tha that book came the Lord of the Rings which is again enjoyed by people of many ages.

A good story is for anyone who enjoys reading/hearing it, I think.  (I've read plenty of children's books both when I was young and as an adult with kids and I can tell you that I am very glad mine out grew some like that were pedantic, predictable and dull.  The kind of book with "We're Here to TEACH You Something Important! Pay Attention to the Lesson")

Another thing is that over the course of the 7 books, which are 7 years in Harry Potter's life, the characters do not remain the same.  The children become teens and then, as per the Wizarding World custom, adults at 17.  The adults become more complicated.  There are new developements that show that something 2-3 books back has importance. There's alot of clever word play and use that shows a fine touch with the language; some of the names are as descriptive as in a Dicken's novel.  One just knows that someone named "Dolores Umbridge" is not a nice person.  Or in the case of Mundungus Fletcher, I found out that his first name is a British name/slang for cheap tobacco. 

The author, Stephen King, wrote an essay about them that I linked to, I think, in the HP: Spoilers thread.  He read and enjoys them.  If you would care to read some by a person who is EO, there is John Granger who has a blog and books.  There is a great deal of symbolism and history and philosophy in the books that is there supporting the story.

Why do you think that they are only for "children"?  While the US distributor is Scholastic, in the UK there are different covers for the children's and adult's copies. 

Just curious.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on August 17, 2007, 09:08:42 AM
Nyssa, Asteriktos, EofK, Ebor,

I see your point. Yes, maybe I should not have asked my question without reading "HP" first. I was just wondering: there are so many wonderful books that are considered classic, and the American literature, incidentally, is definitely one of the richest in the world; but it's virtually unknown un-appreciated, untouched in the US (that has been my impression for years), while millions of readers are chained to Tolkien and Rollings.

A few years ago, I was invited for a party in one of our university professors' house (he is now retired). I noticed that he had a rather large collection of books by Faulkner. But when I said something about these books, the host said, "Oh, I bought them some time ago, but I, of course, never read them and never will. They are just stupid. I tried a few pages and became convinced that Faulkner does not know the first thing about men. We are made in the image and liking of God, and in his writings, people are so ugly, so dumb."

Also, I very often hear from people who are considered intelectuals that this or that book should not be read, or that this or that movie should not be watched because they are "depressing."  :o I heard that said about, for example, Dickens's novels or Chekhov's short stories. On the other hand, people avidly read tons of the "self-help" literature, masterieces like Phil McGraw's... >:(

Younger generations seem to be so "virgin" about what every Soviet kid back in the 1950's-1980's knew by heart as classics. For example, Tom Sawyer, Becky Thatcher, Huck Finn - these names ring no bells here. Nobody seems to know, who were T. Mine Reid (sp.?), Fenimor Cooper...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: FrChris on August 17, 2007, 09:50:53 AM


I'm currently reading The Life of the Virgin Mary The Theotokos

An excellent book, highly recommended by me to most people in my parishes/study groups/etc. Definately somethig that should be re-read annually!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on August 17, 2007, 03:32:13 PM
Heorhij

Quote
I see your point. Yes, maybe I should not have asked my question without reading "HP" first. I was just wondering: there are so many wonderful books that are considered classic, and the American literature, incidentally, is definitely one of the richest in the world; but it's virtually unknown un-appreciated, untouched in the US (that has been my impression for years), while millions of readers are chained to Tolkien and Rollings.

I think your question was totally fair, no harm in asking when you're trying to understand. As far as American literature, I can only speak for myself, but generally I haven't enjoyed a lot of the fiction that I've tried to read, and it's usually a struggle squeezing a couple "classics" in every year. I agree with your point, but I just sort of redirect it in another way, focusing on the unknown and under-appreciated of non-fiction rather than fiction. Every once in a while a fiction author will catch my fancy (Dostoevsky, Tolkien), but it's not enough to pull me into the fictional literature world completely. My imagination and enjoyment of story-telling gets some exercize in other ways, I suppose.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on August 17, 2007, 05:12:14 PM
Heorhij

I think your question was totally fair, no harm in asking when you're trying to understand. As far as American literature, I can only speak for myself, but generally I haven't enjoyed a lot of the fiction that I've tried to read, and it's usually a struggle squeezing a couple "classics" in every year. I agree with your point, but I just sort of redirect it in another way, focusing on the unknown and under-appreciated of non-fiction rather than fiction. Every once in a while a fiction author will catch my fancy (Dostoevsky, Tolkien), but it's not enough to pull me into the fictional literature world completely. My imagination and enjoyment of story-telling gets some exercize in other ways, I suppose.

I understand. I guess I am undergoing an evolution in the same direction (although maybe for a different reason). My upbringing was in an environment where fiction reading was a huge thing, almost a cult. Lately, however, I am usually just too tired, having to read and write so much during my usual day at work. I just cannot focus on fiction. It's getting more and more difficult with age. Yet, reading non-fiction (particularly, biographies and history essays) is somewhat easier, I can concentrate there.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Νεκτάριος on August 17, 2007, 06:20:17 PM
Quote
Younger generations seem to be so "virgin" about what every Soviet kid back in the 1950's-1980's knew by heart as classics. For example, Tom Sawyer, Becky Thatcher, Huck Finn - these names ring no bells here. Nobody seems to know, who were T. Mine Reid (sp.?), Fenimor Cooper...

This baffled me about Russians.  Besides what you mentioned it seemed EVERYONE loved Hemingway, Fitzgerald and Poe.  Then in the next breath they go off on how Americans have no culture, no literature, no authors worth reading etc.  When I pointed out how many 20th century Soviet authors lived in the US and that Americans don't send their artists to gulags it didn't smooth things over.  I guess I'm too некультурный to understand these things.   
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on August 17, 2007, 07:48:54 PM
Dear Nektarios,

Forgive me, I am afraid I hit a nerve. No, I did not mean to imply that the culture I was growing up in was "better" than yours.

Essentially, all I wanted to say was that I personally grew up among books and books and books and more books and more books, and that those kids I socialized with were pretty much like myself. And also that I see quite often that people around me do not seem to know or care about the great American literature. That was all.

Again, please forgive me.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Νεκτάριος on August 17, 2007, 08:06:37 PM
No, no - forgive me!  I didn't make myself clear - nothing you said offended me in the least.  I was only pointing out the irony of my experiences in Russia (sorry, no experiece in Ukraine) of people that are fairly well versed in American literature (and even like it).  It's something I just can't understand - American literature is actually fairly popular (and I was really surprised to see a lot of younger people reading American and English literature - even the new Harry Potter! - in English on the metro) and then the same people turn around and say America is uncultured.  Anyway, I find it interesting how well even older Russians know American literature.  I guess it is just one of the great enigmas of Russia - right up there with why do Russians like dill so much and why don't they extinguish cigarettes before tossing them in trash cans...   
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on August 17, 2007, 08:21:36 PM
I love reading classics.  Even as a kid, I loved reading what was assigned in lit classes.  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on August 17, 2007, 09:40:57 PM
I love reading classics.  Even as a kid, I loved reading what was assigned in lit classes.  :)


Bless you for that!  Trying to get my Latin and Greek students to read the plays of Sophocles, the histories of Herodotus or Tacitus, the epic poems of Homer and Vergil is, most times, very difficult.  I can't understand why they want to take a "dead" foreign lanugage and then NOT read what the Romans and Greeks produced.  However, I have had more luck getting them to read modern novels about Ancient Rome. Robert Graves' I, Claudius works very well for that purpose.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: FrChris on August 17, 2007, 10:20:18 PM
Robert Graves' I, Claudius works very well for that purpose.

Well, it helps that I, Claudius and Claudius The God are just great works in general too!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ian Lazarus on August 17, 2007, 10:31:03 PM
The Further chronicles of Conan.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on August 18, 2007, 09:17:26 AM
No, no - forgive me!  I didn't make myself clear - nothing you said offended me in the least.  I was only pointing out the irony of my experiences in Russia (sorry, no experiece in Ukraine) of people that are fairly well versed in American literature (and even like it).  It's something I just can't understand - American literature is actually fairly popular (and I was really surprised to see a lot of younger people reading American and English literature - even the new Harry Potter! - in English on the metro) and then the same people turn around and say America is uncultured.  Anyway, I find it interesting how well even older Russians know American literature.  I guess it is just one of the great enigmas of Russia - right up there with why do Russians like dill so much and why don't they extinguish cigarettes before tossing them in trash cans...   

I believe part of it was escapism. Another part was snobism, yielding to a certain fashion (for example, quite a lot of people from the "intelligentsia" was living year after year "keeping up with the Johneses," buying certain fashionable books for their home collection - and authors like Hemingway or Faulkner or Robert Penn Warren were always fashionable). But there was also this genuine love for learning and knowledge, and this deep-rooted respect for people who know things and who read.

Thank you so much for not taking the offence! Glory be to God. (Vot i slava Bogu. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on August 18, 2007, 11:32:45 AM
A few years ago, I was invited for a party in one of our university professors' house (he is now retired). I noticed that he had a rather large collection of books by Faulkner. But when I said something about these books, the host said, "Oh, I bought them some time ago, but I, of course, never read them and never will. They are just stupid. I tried a few pages and became convinced that Faulkner does not know the first thing about men. We are made in the image and liking of God, and in his writings, people are so ugly, so dumb."

I completely agree with this man.  :)  Seriously, though, my biggest complaint about Faulkner is that the man just didn't write well.  He has interesting stories to tell, but he does it in such a way that I lose interest.  For example, the first sentence in Absalom, Absalom is about three pages long.  For one sentence.  He also employs the "stream of conciousness" style of writing, which means he writes the first thing that comes off the top of his head, so you'll have a thirty page digression that's completely unrelated to the story.  If it does happen to be related, you'll be so confused by the end of it that there's no point in him telling it.  I gave up reading that book after the first twenty pages or so.  Made my head hurt trying to follow him.

Quote
Also, I very often hear from people who are considered intelectuals that this or that book should not be read, or that this or that movie should not be watched because they are "depressing."  :o I heard that said about, for example, Dickens's novels or Chekhov's short stories. On the other hand, people avidly read tons of the "self-help" literature, masterieces like Phil McGraw's... >:(

That's so sad.  I love Dickens and Chekhov and, true, they do tend to be downtrodden at times but they have great things to say.  Dickens especially was very vocal on the horrors of industrialism.  Then you have "Dr." Phil McGraw who couldn't "self-help" his way out of a paper bag.  I think there is more to be learned (and worth more in the eternal) from the Dickens and Chekhovs of the world than from all the self-help garbage on the shelves these days. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on August 18, 2007, 01:24:24 PM
Bless you for that!  Trying to get my Latin and Greek students to read the plays of Sophocles, the histories of Herodotus or Tacitus, the epic poems of Homer and Vergil is, most times, very difficult.  I can't understand why they want to take a "dead" foreign lanugage and then NOT read what the Romans and Greeks produced.  However, I have had more luck getting them to read modern novels about Ancient Rome. Robert Graves' I, Claudius works very well for that purpose.
It would be wonderful to get to read Sophocles in his own words. Unfortunately, I don't have time to learn a "dead" language as I'm too busy teaching a "living" one (Spanish). My drama students, though, are reading Aeschylus' Eumenides next week, translated by Robert Fagles. It's a pretty decent translation from what I've heard; I can't read the original...yet.

Consequently, I'm re-reading The Eumenides this weekend.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on August 18, 2007, 02:00:45 PM
Imy biggest complaint about Faulkner is that the man just didn't write well.  He has interesting stories to tell, but he does it in such a way that I lose interest.  For example, the first sentence in Absalom, Absalom is about three pages long.  For one sentence.  He also employs the "stream of conciousness" style of writing, which means he writes the first thing that comes off the top of his head, so you'll have a thirty page digression that's completely unrelated to the story.  If it does happen to be related, you'll be so confused by the end of it that there's no point in him telling it.  I gave up reading that book after the first twenty pages or so.  Made my head hurt trying to follow him.


Well, I guess that's just your attachment to pre-modernist, essentially 19th century (Victorian and early post-Victorian) way of artistic expression. In a similar way, one can say that Sisley and Pisarro and Monet and especially Gaugin and Sezanne and van Gogh "did not paint well." :)

I was very surprised, astonished when I first read Faulkner (it was "The Sound and the Fury"), but then, later, I sort of "communed" with him, and at the end I was almost literally crying, shedding tears. Again, same thing as your impression after viewing Monet's canvases of the Rouen cathedral. First impression - weird; is it really painting, art, or is he kidding, playing a practical joke with me? But then you get used and finally it hits you like a truckload of bricks. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Eleos on August 18, 2007, 07:06:51 PM
Is anyone else an audiobook fiend like me?  I use audible.com and listen to books while I drive, relax before bedtime, garden, cook, exercise, and do housework.  Since I started this, I read about 20x in a given year the amount than I did in years past.

Im currently listening to:
The Disappearance of Childhood - Neil Postman
Snowcrash - Neil Stephenson
Do you! - Russell Simmons
The Coming China Wars - Peter Navarro
The Destruction of Jerusalem - Josephus
The Princess and Curdie - George Macdonald

Since Dr Phil McGraw was mentioned, I should say that "self-help" non-fiction genre is something I usually avoid and have usually not been able to proceed beyond chapter one...perhaps thats why i flounder about...but I have to admit I'm really am enjoying Russell Simmons - "Do you!".  He is the cofounder of Def Jam Records, the architect of Hip Hop, a practitioner of Yoga, a fan of Eckhart Tolle,  founder of Baby Phat clothing, husband of Kimora Lee Simmons among many many many other things).  If you have lived to see american hip hop culture birthed from R&B up until now, you may enjoy hearing self-help with framed in experiences with Run Dmc, Jay Z, Beastie Boys, and many more.

I should also mention that if you love children's books make sure to read all of George Macdonald, early fantasy writer who influenced Tolkien, CS Lewis and countless others.  My family finished Princess and the Goblin unabridged audio on our summer roadtrip and the one I mentioned above is a sequel.  Both excellent.  We got to take the 1.5 hour walk to the bottom of Carlsbad Caverns with Goblins, caves and strange creatures on our minds!  I recommend the two together!  Certainly a "trippy" road trip in those caves.  Helps me understand the aesthetic of the Golem cave story in the Hobbit too.

The Disappearance of Childhood is pretty fascinating as a parent, but Im not far enough into it to give much info.  This is my first Neil Postman book and I hope to read more.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on August 21, 2007, 06:03:04 PM
I think I should stay on this forum.  I just checked out another forum a few minutes ago; there were whole threads about the evils of Harry Potter and Dungeons & Dragons, that we shouldn't even read/play them as Orthodox Christians.  I had enough of that when I was in evangelical churches.   :'(
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on August 21, 2007, 06:59:47 PM
I think I should stay on this forum.  I just checked out another forum a few minutes ago; there were whole threads about the evils of Harry Potter and Dungeons & Dragons, that we shouldn't even read/play them as Orthodox Christians.  I had enough of that when I was in evangelical churches.   :'(
Heartily agreed. Glad to see you're going to stick around.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on August 21, 2007, 10:54:38 PM
Nyssa, Asteriktos, EofK, Ebor,

I see your point. Yes, maybe I should not have asked my question without reading "HP" first. I was just wondering: there are so many wonderful books that are considered classic, and the American literature, incidentally, is definitely one of the richest in the world; but it's virtually unknown un-appreciated, untouched in the US (that has been my impression for years), while millions of readers are chained to Tolkien and Rollings.

I don't think that it's really unappreciated.  You hear about Tolkien and Rowling because of the new books, "The Children of Hurin" and "Deathly Hallows".  There aren't stories in the paper along the lines of "Kids reading E. Nesbit books"  or "Highschool book club digs into Hemingway"  ;)  Also, as a side note, I would say that "Deathly Hallows" is not a "kids book" as some would use the term (not you personally George).  It is not bland or only dealing with small things.

Meanwhile, the classics are often part of the school curricula.  Last year, our oldest in 8th grade read such things as "Midsummer Night's Dream" and another Shakespeare play, a YA (young adult) novel drawn from the Japanese "Tale of the Heike" (12th century) and, yes, "The Hobbit" (but he'd read it years before as well as we read it to him and his sister) among other books.  This year the 9th grade reading will be drawn from a list that includes "To Kill a Mockingbird", "A Farewell to Arms", "A Tale of Two Cities", "Les Miserables", "The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman", "Farewell to Manzanar", "Of Mice and Men", "My Antonia", "Antigone", "Flowers for Algernon", "Cry the Beloved Country" and more. 

Meanwhile at home (where "we collect books the way magnets draw iron filings"  :D ) our children know of "Beowulf", "Canterbury Tales" E.Nesbit stories, Edgar Eager books ("Half Magic" is great fun), "Cheaper by the Dozen", Classic children's books like "Paddle to the Sea" and "Centerburg Tales", Science Fiction and Fantasy, History (for a summer reading report the oldest is reading "Sisterhood of Spies" about women in the OSS in WWII).  So I think that American literature *is* being read, but it isn't talked about in public as much.

Quote
A few years ago, I was invited for a party in one of our university professors' house (he is now retired). I noticed that he had a rather large collection of books by Faulkner. But when I said something about these books, the host said, "Oh, I bought them some time ago, but I, of course, never read them and never will. They are just stupid. I tried a few pages and became convinced that Faulkner does not know the first thing about men. We are made in the image and liking of God, and in his writings, people are so ugly, so dumb."

Ouch!  Well, as the old Irish saying goes "If we all liked the same thing, there wouldn't be enough to go around."

My father, who grew up on a dirt-farm in Virginia, greatly esteems Faulkner and I believe he has copies of all of his works (he also likes Thomas Hardy and many other authors). I think that Faulkner wrote of aspects of life in the American South that perhaps not all readers can fully absorb or understand. And that's OK. 

Quote
Also, I very often hear from people who are considered intelectuals that this or that book should not be read, or that this or that movie should not be watched because they are "depressing."  :o I heard that said about, for example, Dickens's novels or Chekhov's short stories. On the other hand, people avidly read tons of the "self-help" literature, masterieces like Phil McGraw's... >:(

Phil McGraw is "Dr. Phil"?  I've heard the name, but I think I only saw him once when he was on Sesame Street that our youngest was watching with a muppet named "Dr. Feel" in a sketch about angry, happy and other feelings. 

Anyway, what those people say (they're really "intellectual"?!?) sounds really strange to me.  It sounds quite superficial in how they look at a book or movie.  It sounds more like they want to be insulated from real life or something.  Or that there is some kind of sense that their personal tastes should apply to all.

Quote
Younger generations seem to be so "virgin" about what every Soviet kid back in the 1950's-1980's knew by heart as classics. For example, Tom Sawyer, Becky Thatcher, Huck Finn - these names ring no bells here. Nobody seems to know, who were T. Mine Reid (sp.?), Fenimor Cooper...

A couple of things here.  In some times and places, there have been moves to get rid of books for various reasons.  "Huckleberry Finn" is one that stands out;  it has been challenged many times because for one thing, some people do not want their children or others to read a book with the "n-word".  They cannot see past the word to the message and story of how Huck *helps* Jim the slave to escape to freedom.  Twain used the word because it was the common speech of the time.  I do not write it here because it would be inappropriate, but in "Tom Sawyer" and "Huckleberry Finn" it is.

Nat Hentoff, the columnist, wrote a short YA novel on this "The Day They Came to Arrest the Book".  In it a group of parents and students try to prevent "Huckleberry Finn" from being taught because it is racist, or sexist or violent or immoral.  It's a short read; I recommend it.

There's also the kind of thing that Diane Ravitch has written of in "The Language Police: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn".  For some people, if they don't like an idea or a word, then it should not be allowed.  In other cases, people who don't understand what a writer is trying to get across or see the point of the story, try to ban it.  Some of the instances in the book are of a story about a blind mountain climber not being allowed because the review group said it is bias to say that something like blindness is a disability.  One that really annoyed me when I read the book was that stories about people who lived near mountains or the sea couldn't be allowed because children who didn't live in such areas would not be able to understand or identify with them.  I'm sorry, growing up in Montana, I read things like "Treasure Island" because it was about something different: the sea and ships.    I recommend this book too.

I apologize for the length.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on August 21, 2007, 10:56:15 PM
I think I should stay on this forum.  I just checked out another forum a few minutes ago; there were whole threads about the evils of Harry Potter and Dungeons & Dragons, that we shouldn't even read/play them as Orthodox Christians.  I had enough of that when I was in evangelical churches.   :'(

It's good that you could join us here, Nyssa.  :) 

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on August 21, 2007, 10:58:40 PM
The Further chronicles of Conan.

As in the Barbarian?  And mightily thewed he is, by Crom!

 ;)

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on August 21, 2007, 11:05:41 PM
It would be wonderful to get to read Sophocles in his own words. Unfortunately, I don't have time to learn a "dead" language as I'm too busy teaching a "living" one (Spanish). My drama students, though, are reading Aeschylus' Eumenides next week, translated by Robert Fagles. It's a pretty decent translation from what I've heard; I can't read the original...yet.

Consequently, I'm re-reading The Eumenides this weekend.

I feel the same way.  It would be nice to read some works in their original languages as well as in translation.  One such case for me would be to be able to read Japanese poetry in the original including the characters which have meaning.  This is where I wish there was such a thing as "wet-ware", an idea from SF that is knowledge that can be loaded into a human like a new software program in a computer.   :)  I recall one story about a man who makes his living by learning languages which make, as it were, programing or patterns in his brain. This can be then 'transplanted' to another person who then knows the language.  But this process takes the skill away from the protagonist and he has to learn it again for the next person.  Iirc, he's learnt Spanish several times.  In the story he's holding off the people who have come to take the 'patterns' to give to the customer who has to take an exam at gun point.  The reason he's doing that is that he wants to FINISH reading "Don Quixote" in the original language. 

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on August 22, 2007, 09:04:30 AM
Sounds like a really interesting story. I hope the library doesn't do that to me; I find myself often saying, "Oh, it's only twenty cents--I've got to finish this."  :D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on August 26, 2007, 01:17:14 PM
I think I should stay on this forum.  I just checked out another forum a few minutes ago; there were whole threads about the evils of Harry Potter and Dungeons & Dragons, that we shouldn't even read/play them as Orthodox Christians.  I had enough of that when I was in evangelical churches.   :'(

I just saw those threads yesterday.  Good grief! and also !Sigh!  There were some unfortunate examples of people not understanding what others (including J. K. Rowling) said or meant as well as some of "I haven't read them, but I *know* that what's there is evil/wrong." 

We discuss books and movies here mostly without such things, (and just to warn you, there are a number of Tolkien fans as well.  :)  As you may have noticed with my 'custom title' to the left. )

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on August 26, 2007, 09:44:32 PM
Indeed, there are way too many who judge a book without reading it.  I was told for years to avoid Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov because it's a book about a pedophile.  Granted, it is a little sickening to read since it's written from the pedophile's point of view but it's some of the most beautiful prose I've ever read.  Incredible craftmanship in those pages, despite the subject. 

I'm reading Dune again now (as evidenced by the new avatar).  I'm also reading/working through Stitch and B***h: The Knitter's Handbook and Knitters Rule! since I'm trying to get back into crafting things.  It's nearing the Christmas and birthday season (just about everyone I know has a birthday in fall or winter) so I figure I can make lots of cheap but fun gifts.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PeterTheAleut on August 27, 2007, 12:57:40 AM
I think I should stay on this forum.  I just checked out another forum a few minutes ago; there were whole threads about the evils of Harry Potter and Dungeons & Dragons, that we shouldn't even read/play them as Orthodox Christians.  I had enough of that when I was in evangelical churches.   :'(
Totally off topic, Nyssa, but I love your choice of avatar.  I remember watching Sarah Sutton when she played the role of Nyssa in the Doctor Who series during the Tom Baker/Peter Davison era.  I grew up watching Doctor Who
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on August 27, 2007, 08:04:13 PM
Thanks.  I grew up with it, too, and Nyssa was one of my favorites.  :)  When I found out there was a St. Gregory of Nyssa, I was pleasantly surprised.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GiC on August 28, 2007, 12:43:31 AM
Thanks.  I grew up with it, too, and Nyssa was one of my favorites.  :)  When I found out there was a St. Gregory of Nyssa, I was pleasantly surprised.

Wonderful Saint he is, one of my favourites...as though most here couldn't have guessed that ;) ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ian Lazarus on August 28, 2007, 12:47:38 AM
Quote
As in the Barbarian?  And mightily thewed he is, by Crom!

ANd apparantly destined to wear the jewled crown of Acquilonia upon a troubled brow.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on August 28, 2007, 07:49:00 PM
Wonderful Saint he is, one of my favourites...as though most here couldn't have guessed that ;) ;D

I'm thinking about taking on St. Gregory of Nyssa as a patron saint, along with my namesake (Queen Esther).  I even found an icon of him.  :D  No such luck with icons of Queen Esther, however....

Back on topic, I'm now reading Steven Runciman's "The Eastern Schism."  It's very enlightening.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on September 04, 2007, 01:59:06 PM
ANd apparantly destined to wear the jewled crown of Acquilonia upon a troubled brow.

after he treads the jeweled thrones of the Earth under his sandalled feet.
 ;)

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on September 04, 2007, 06:24:45 PM
In between all my textbooks (sigh), I'm reading

 The Ladder of Divine Ascent by St. John Klimakos
 
 Tales from the 1001 Nights trans. by Sir Richard Burton
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on September 05, 2007, 10:08:57 AM
Finally finished Robert Graves' I, Claudius and now I'm on to Claudius the God.  I really need to start reading more than just non-fiction.  Anyone have suggestions as to good historical fiction.  Is there anything like that for the Byzantine era?  Let me know.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on September 05, 2007, 01:39:58 PM
Finally finished Robert Graves' I, Claudius and now I'm on to Claudius the God.  I really need to start reading more than just non-fiction.  Anyone have suggestions as to good historical fiction. 

How far back and away do you want to go?   ;D  "The Tale of Genji" is fiction and written in Heian Japan around the year 1000.  The Norse Sagas are historical and and some are ripping good stories.  I'll be glad to check my shelves for recco's if you like. 

Ebor  ("So many books, so little time")
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on September 05, 2007, 01:55:57 PM
Finally finished Robert Graves' I, Claudius and now I'm on to Claudius the God.  I really need to start reading more than just non-fiction.  Anyone have suggestions as to good historical fiction.  Is there anything like that for the Byzantine era?  Let me know.

If you can read Ukrainian (unfortunately, I am not sure that there were English translations), I would very highly recommend Semen Sklyarenko's historical novels "Svyatoslav" and "Volodymyr." They were published in the original Ukrainian in the USSR, in the early- to mid-1960's. Both were my favorite historical novels when I was still a pre-teen. They are about the two powerful Eastern Slavic rulers, Svyatoslav Ihorevych (a grandson of the famous Scandinavian warrior Rurik and the son of a Slavic princess Volga a.k.a. Olga, an outstanding woman who was baptized and later canonized), and Svyatoslav's son, Volodymyr (Vladimir) Svyatoslavovych, baptized, canonized and declared "equal-to-the-Apostles" by the Orthodox Church. Both novels show a lot of history not only of Rus', but also of its neighboring countries, especially Byzantium. Of course, both of these novels are not quite "objective" (Slavs are shown as mostly heroes and Greeks mostly as constantly plotting against the good, freedom-loving Slavs), but as historical fiction, they are masterpieces.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on September 05, 2007, 03:45:28 PM
How far back and away do you want to go?   ;D  "The Tale of Genji" is fiction and written in Heian Japan around the year 1000. 

I'll second that recommendation.  I read that book last year.  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on September 05, 2007, 05:48:52 PM
I'll second that recommendation.  I read that book last year.  :)

Which translation did you read?  (or should I be envious and you can read Japanese?   :) )

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on September 05, 2007, 06:43:15 PM
How far back and away do you want to go?   ;D  "The Tale of Genji" is fiction and written in Heian Japan around the year 1000.  The Norse Sagas are historical and and some are ripping good stories.  I'll be glad to check my shelves for recco's if you like. 

Ebor  ("So many books, so little time")


Thanks for the suggestion Ebor.  No offense to Japanese Culture, but I'd prefer to stick with material about the Middle EAst or Europe.  I have read Njal's Saga though it has been a long time and I should revisit it again.  I'll have to check into the Nibelungenlied again after listening to Gotterdamerung by Wagner.  Any opera fans, out there?  I know, wrong forum.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on September 05, 2007, 08:28:11 PM
Thanks for the suggestion Ebor.  No offense to Japanese Culture, but I'd prefer to stick with material about the Middle EAst or Europe.  I have read Njal's Saga though it has been a long time and I should revisit it again.  I'll have to check into the Nibelungenlied again after listening to Gotterdamerung by Wagner.  Any opera fans, out there?  I know, wrong forum.

We found a rather fine production of the Ring Cycle last year. Some of the staging was very cool, (Fasolt and Fafnir as HUGE structures with the singers as the head and it must have been several stage hands underneath to move the body and arms and trundle it around; the Rhine defined by laser light in billows of stage smoke/fog.)  some not as much.  But Graham Clarke as Loge in "Das Rheingold" and then as Mime in "Siegfried" was riveting and John Tomlinson as Wotan was wonderful.  Back to the books

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on September 05, 2007, 08:49:03 PM
Thanks for the suggestion Ebor.  No offense to Japanese Culture, but I'd prefer to stick with material about the Middle EAst or Europe.  I have read Njal's Saga though it has been a long time and I should revisit it again.  I'll have to check into the Nibelungenlied again after listening to Gotterdamerung by Wagner.  Any opera fans, out there?  I know, wrong forum.

We were telling the kids a bit about Njal's Saga just last night, the part about the death of Gunnar and before that the man going to find out if he is home in Hlidarend whom Gunnar hears and thrusts his halberd though the roofing.  When the others ask if Gunnar is home he replies "I do not know if Gunnar is home, but his halberd is."  And with that he fell dead. 

Well, have you read "Egil's Saga"?  There are several fascinating bits related to that one.  A roommate of mine was studying for a Ph.D in English specializing in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse.  One of the Profs had been to Iceland, met descendents of Egil and they could do the quirky bit with the eyebrows that Egil is described as doing.  Also, from the descriptions of Egil's old age that quote him saying things like his extremities feel cold and he's losing his hearing as well as such things as his being described as ugly and bumpy *and* that he could be struck on the head with a weapon but his skull was so thick that it didn't kill him, a doctor some while back diagnosed Paget's Disease. 
http://www.viking.ucla.edu/Scientific_American/Egils_Bones.htm

Egil was both a fearsome warrior and a fine poet, both of which were important abilities.

Oh, how about "Gilgamesh"?  That's Middle Eastern and Old.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Veniamin on September 05, 2007, 08:56:55 PM
Right now, when I'm not busy reading cases and statutes for class, I'm working on Rick Atkinson's An Army at Dawn about the war in North Africa in 1942-43.

Mostly, though, it's the Internal Revenue Code and Texas Oil and Gas Law.  :'(
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on September 05, 2007, 09:29:37 PM
I don't recall who did the Tale of Genjii translation, but I bought it from Dover Publications.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: jlerms on September 06, 2007, 12:51:23 AM

Another amusing part in Njal's Saga is when a warrior gets his leg cut off in battle and all he says is,
"That is what I get for forgetting my shield". :P

Juliana
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jakub on September 06, 2007, 04:56:16 PM
Getting ready to start "Unseen Warfare" from St. Vladimirs Seminary Press, one needs many resources to do battle with the enemy...

james
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on September 06, 2007, 05:33:35 PM
Another amusing part in Njal's Saga is when a warrior gets his leg cut off in battle and all he says is,
"That is what I get for forgetting my shield". :P

Juliana


Ah. Nice to see another Saga reader here.  I sometimes wonder if Norsemen made a little list of "Things to say..." if my ship is sinking; if I am captured by an enemy:  If I'm about to go over a cliff...  that sort of thing.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ComingHome on September 07, 2007, 10:58:24 PM
Getting ready to start "Unseen Warfare" from St. Vladimirs Seminary Press, one needs many resources to do battle with the enemy...

I have just finished this one (last night).  It was very good and has much helpful "advice."

I am working on The Idiot by Dostoevsky.  It like Brothers is not the easiest book I have ever read but I am enjoying it anyway.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Panagiotis on September 08, 2007, 01:33:29 AM
Philokalia Vol. #4
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on September 10, 2007, 07:33:46 PM
Philokalia Vol. #4

Why am I not surprised that you're reading something that deep?  ;)  I'm too scared to touch it, myself.  :P
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Punch on September 11, 2007, 01:04:54 PM
Just finished "Canaries on the Rim".  Am part way through "Rising Tide" and "Windscale 1957".  Continuously reading "Discipline and Discharge in Arbitration".
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on September 12, 2007, 04:49:28 PM
I am working on The Idiot by Dostoevsky.  It like Brothers is not the easiest book I have ever read but I am enjoying it anyway.

Please let me know when you finish this. Which translation are you using?
I can't believe how long it has taken me to get through this one - 24 pages to go...(pant, pant)
When I finally viewed online the painting by Holbein which was the catalyst for this novel, I was not as taken with it as Dostoevsky is described to have been.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Eleos on September 13, 2007, 11:19:40 AM
FYI, there's a great public domain audiobook library here:
http://librivox.org/ (http://librivox.org/)

I listened to "Notes From the Underground" by Dostoyevsky, it was excellent.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on September 13, 2007, 01:12:34 PM
FYI, there's a great public domain audiobook library here:
http://librivox.org/ (http://librivox.org/)

I listened to "Notes From the Underground" by Dostoyevsky, it was excellent.


An excellent read, yes; incredible, in fact, especially for the period.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on September 13, 2007, 03:06:11 PM
My students' tests. Wish I had time for something deeper. I need to pick up Dostoyevsky; he's been on my shelf about two years now, untouched.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on September 13, 2007, 03:46:05 PM
My students' tests. Wish I had time for something deeper. I need to pick up Dostoyevsky; he's been on my shelf about two years now, untouched.

Which one(s), works, that is?

I just today started my second read of his The Demons.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on September 14, 2007, 12:32:25 AM
My students' tests. Wish I had time for something deeper. I need to pick up Dostoyevsky; he's been on my shelf about two years now, untouched.

Hey, Y,

I knew you were a teacher (as am I), but I don't know your subject.  Please tell.

I'm in for  long weekend of reading tests myself, mainly checking Latin verb and noun paradigms.  Are your tests covering stuff so trite and boring as this?   Wish I had the time to devote to Claudius the God, which, I am sorry to say, is not as good a read as I, Claudius.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on September 14, 2007, 07:50:24 AM
Which one(s), works, that is?
Idiot and Brothers Karamazov. I figured these were a good place to start.

Hey, Y,

I knew you were a teacher (as am I), but I don't know your subject.  Please tell.

I'm in for  long weekend of reading tests myself, mainly checking Latin verb and noun paradigms.  Are your tests covering stuff so trite and boring as this?   Wish I had the time to devote to Claudius the God, which, I am sorry to say, is not as good a read as I, Claudius.
Oh, yes, trite. I teach languages, Spanish and English. My Spanish tests are always full of Spanish verb conjugations--it's quite similar to your tests. My English tests are mostly literature, which is interesting, but I have a couple of grammar tests each year too, and those are boring indeed. Six pages of identifying parts of speech and correcting grammatical errors in sample sentences. Grading tests has to be the second worst part of my job, but it's also one of the most important parts.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on September 14, 2007, 10:30:52 AM
This is just a thread to ask what everyone is reading.  Till Wendsday I will be reading nothing other than textbooks, but after that---ooh man do I ever have a stack to get through.  As soon as I am done with my finals, I am making it top priority to finish Law of God.

Joe Zollars

Tell me how Law of God is going so far.  I've wanted to buy it for a long time, but was hesitant to drop $50.  I like the fact it's in hard cover.  I wish so many Orthodox books were bound that way.  The paperbacks get yellow and ratty with time and they are usually books you'll go back to over and over.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on September 14, 2007, 10:34:11 AM
I, Claudius.[/i]

I, Claudius.  The book was great, but I absolutely loved the Masterpiece Theatre adaptation in the 70's.  I was about 13 and it was the most amazing thing I'd ever seen.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on September 14, 2007, 10:39:42 AM
Grading tests has to be the second worst part of my job, but it's also one of the most important parts.

Now I'm curious Mr. Y.  If grading papers is the 2nd worst, what is #1?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on September 14, 2007, 09:06:32 PM
Disciplining kids. I hate it. Has to be done, but that doesn't mean it isn't painful.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on September 14, 2007, 09:38:21 PM
Disciplining kids. I hate it. Has to be done, but that doesn't mean it isn't painful.

My dad always laughs when people say how kids are disciplined now in schools then tells us a wonderful tale of Brother Augustin (Roman Catholic school, taught by monks) and his methods.   :P  How times have changed with just one generation...

Anyways, I'm enjoying a good, dry, technical read through of 'A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming'.  The joys of being back in class.   ;) :D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on September 18, 2007, 10:20:44 AM
Well,  yesterday I was reading up on the "French and Indian War" for history class.
I've also been reading a "Disc World" book or two by Terry Pratchett, and a mystery set in Japan with Inspector Otani by Melville among other things

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on October 12, 2007, 05:13:41 PM
Finally got a chance to finish Fr. Seraphim Roses's Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future.  Very interesting to see an Orthodox father's perspective on occultism and charismatics.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on October 12, 2007, 06:26:24 PM
I'm on my third reading of Clarissa by Samuel Richardson.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on October 12, 2007, 06:34:26 PM
I just finished Kite Runner by Khaled Housseini. It is a very fast and easy read, but still a very, very sad book. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on October 25, 2007, 01:20:54 PM
Started and finished J.D. Salinger's Franny and Zooey yesterday. My sister sent it to me and insisted I read it (the Jesus Prayer is central to the book, sort of).

I took a break from the 'Big D' -Dostoevsky - but am returning to him tonight.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BrotherAidan on October 25, 2007, 03:59:37 PM
Started and finished J.D. Salinger's Franny and Zooey yesterday. My sister sent it to me and insisted I read it (the Jesus Prayer is central to the book, sort of).

I took a break from the 'Big D' -Dostoevsky - but am returning to him tonight.
I just read about that book today in a book I am reading (by an author who is an English professor/poet, and orthodox layman who went to Mt. Athos - can't remember the title cause it's real long)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on October 28, 2007, 11:25:44 AM
American History in the 1815-1824 period; the latest Naomi Novak "Temeraire" book Empire of Ivory; a study of Japanese literature in the medieval period; "Usagi Yojimbo" and others depending on where I am. (doesn't everyone have books in progress in different places?  :D )

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on October 28, 2007, 04:30:52 PM
Just finished Yarn Harlot (sort of a memoir/rant from an obsessive knitter) and have started Snow Flower and the Secret Fan.  It's a story of two Chinese women using a secret language known only to Chinese women.  Pretty interested so far, though I could have done without the description of footbinding.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Carpatho Russian on October 28, 2007, 04:58:06 PM
I'm in the process of reading Being as Communion by John Zizioulas.  I've just started 1453 The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West by Roger Crowley.  And for fun, I'm reading Rumpole and the Penge Bungalow Murders by John Mortimer.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on October 29, 2007, 08:15:21 AM
Started and finished J.D. Salinger's Franny and Zooey yesterday. My sister sent it to me and insisted I read it (the Jesus Prayer is central to the book, sort of).
.

I love "Franny and Zooey." It's funny that Salinger is always associated in people's minds with his "Catcher in the Rye," while I believe his Glass saga is so much more mature and interesting.

I haven't been reading any fiction for quite a while, sorry... My last week's reading was all psychology and pedagogy - excerpts from a book by Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria, titled, "Ape. Primitive. Child."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aserb on October 29, 2007, 08:17:59 AM
"Havana - Autobiography of a City"

Fascinating and another in my run of historical novels set around cities. SO far this year I ahve done Bethlehem and Jaffa
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on November 08, 2007, 08:40:46 AM
"11th Month, 11th Day, 11th Hour- Armistice Day 1918, World War I and Its Violent Climax" by Joseph E. Persico

It's a collection of military archives, public records, private journal entries and letters dated 11/11/1918 which gives an extraordinary insight into the lives of British, French, American and German soldiers in the trenches on the first Armistice Day. For example, Adolf Hitler was in hospital on that day, and when he heard that Germany had surrendered, he went blind, and his medical record for the day shows a Berlin Psychiatrist's entry which described the patient as "a psychopath with hysterical symptoms".
What struck me the most was the private letters of the soldiers, especially when describing the senseless and pointless fighting which took place in the last few hours of the war.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on November 08, 2007, 11:24:38 AM
The Long Loneliness: the autobiography of Dorothy Day

Fascinating life of a fascinating woman. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on November 08, 2007, 11:55:40 AM
"11th Month, 11th Day, 11th Hour- Armistice Day 1918, World War I and Its Violent Climax" by Joseph E. Persico

It's a collection of military archives, public records, private journal entries and letters dated 11/11/1918 which gives an extraordinary insight into the lives of British, French, American and German soldiers in the trenches on the first Armistice Day. For example, Adolf Hitler was in hospital on that day, and when he heard that Germany had surrendered, he went blind, and his medical record for the day shows a Berlin Psychiatrist's entry which described the patient as "a psychopath with hysterical symptoms".
What struck me the most was the private letters of the soldiers, especially when describing the senseless and pointless fighting which took place in the last few hours of the war.

That sounds like a very interesting book.  I'm going to look for it.

I'm reading more of my American History class text. We're up to 1820-1840. Also "Nausicaa" by Miyazaki, a volume of ranch recollections by a Montana author.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Νεκτάριος on November 08, 2007, 02:29:40 PM
A book that I'm working on now, that I think most here would also enjoy is Nikolai Leskov's On the Edge of the World.  It is about a missionary bishop in Siberia.  It reads sort of as a cross of Jack London and Death Comes for the Archbishop

From the back cover:
Quote
The purpose behind the bishop's journey is to teach and baptize.  During the process he learns through example and suffering that Baptism without preparation is ritual devoid fo content, that in indigenous peoples of all cultures there is a striking dignity, as well as established codes of moral behavior that must be recognized and built upon as a foundation for all Christian conversion.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ziggernaut on November 09, 2007, 06:49:07 PM
Just started Not of This World-The Life and Teachings of Fr. Seraphim Rose.  Just finished a second reading of Way of the Ascetics by Tito Colliander.

Blessings,
Jeff
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ignatius on November 09, 2007, 07:08:19 PM
On The Incarnation by St. Athanasius (St. Vladimir's Seminary Press)

Eusebius: The Church History translation and commentary by Paul L. Maier

Tradition, Scripture, and Interpretation: A Source-book of the Ancient Church Edited by D.H. Williams

God Bless!  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on November 11, 2007, 06:32:57 PM
Mikhail Bakhtin's essay on Rabelais (sorry guys, in Russian: http://www.philosophy.ru/library/bahtin/rable.html - Nektarios and Young Fogey will certainly appreciate, and others, but, unfortunately, not all). What a great philosopher, thinker, wow... (I mean Bakhtin, although Rabelais is of course a great philosopher as well.)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Athanasios on November 12, 2007, 11:32:45 PM
Hello,

Primarily, I am reading textbooks right now.

I am also reading the Complete Works of Saint John of the Cross and the Holy Bible (cover to cover, on Judges now).

After the semester, I probably throw a couple other theology and/or Church Fathers on the pile (I can read 3 - 4 books at a time).

I am not much for fiction, but I'll occasionally read some Shakespeare, Dickens, poetry, etc.

I'll do that for a month, and then back to reading more textbooks.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: wynd on November 13, 2007, 12:39:07 AM
I am taking a break from theological stuff for a while. I just finished the book Forrest Gump. It's good, but completely different from the movie (in a good way).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PeterTheAleut on November 13, 2007, 12:43:01 AM
Papers and Minutes from the Unofficial Consultation Between Theologians of the Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Churches (August 11-15, 1964)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: JoeS on November 13, 2007, 03:56:26 PM


Life of Moses/ by Gregory of Nyssa/ Paulist Press

The Fathers of the Church/ St. John Chrysostom Homilies on Genesis/ Catholic University Press.

JoeS
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Andrew21091 on November 30, 2007, 11:48:50 PM
I'm currently a quarter way through Father Seraphim Rose:His Life and Works. It is a very interesting read.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on December 01, 2007, 03:14:15 PM
Fr. Seraphim Rose is indeed an interesting figure. 

I'm currently working on Bill Bryson's The Lost Continent: Travels in Small Town America
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Robert W on December 01, 2007, 03:21:04 PM
I have borrowed the first ever work on Orthodoxy in Swedish I have come across:
"Min Ortodoxa tro" (My Orthodox faith) by Johannes Seppälä.

It's a relief to read a real book instead of all the "Internet-Orthodoxy".

I'm also reading the Heraldica Fennica ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Eugenio on December 01, 2007, 03:44:45 PM
"Orality and Literacy" by Fr. Walter Ong (1982).

A fantastic read. It points out how our very consciousness has changed as a result of moving from an oral to a print culture - and the last points out how this affected Western Christendom as well.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: JoeS on December 01, 2007, 09:27:41 PM
This is just a thread to ask what everyone is reading.  Till Wendsday I will be reading nothing other than textbooks, but after that---ooh man do I ever have a stack to get through.  As soon as I am done with my finals, I am making it top priority to finish Law of God.

Joe Zollars

An Inconvenient Book, Glenn Beck
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ian Lazarus on December 01, 2007, 10:07:38 PM
Tea leaves.  This one says "Made in China".  Big surprise there. ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on December 02, 2007, 06:14:33 PM
"Orality and Literacy" by Fr. Walter Ong (1982).

A fantastic read. It points out how our very consciousness has changed as a result of moving from an oral to a print culture - and the last points out how this affected Western Christendom as well.

Wow.  I read that when I was in grad school when I was taking a bunch of courses on oral tradition.  If I may suggest, Eugenio, a few other titles you may wish to read in relation to Ong.

1)  Albert Lord, The Singer of Tales
2)  John M. Foley, The Theory of Oral Composition
3)  John M. Foley, Oral Tradition

Dr. Foley, a professor of mine at the University of MIssouri is one of the leading authorities on oral tradition in the world (he writes a new book on the subject about every 2 years) and was a student of Lord, who, in turn was a student of Milman Parry, whose doctoral dissertation back in 1928 laid the groundwork for the Iliad as an oral poem which then precipitated a number of studies on oral poetry.  Lord went to the former Yugoslavia for some practical field work in that area, but now, the study of oral composition has become almost universal.  The poetry-myths of Tibet, the near/far East, Native American Culture, Africa are now all being actively engaged for study of this wonderful phenomenon.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on December 02, 2007, 06:55:43 PM
Tea leaves.  This one says "Made in China".  Big surprise there. ;)

Watch out for lead content.  ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ian Lazarus on December 02, 2007, 06:57:23 PM
And Communist propaganda. ;) ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on December 13, 2007, 09:34:11 AM
Just discovered a new (for me) old author-historian, a Russian named Boris Bashilov. (For those who read Russian, several of his books are published online in the XRONOS library, http://www.hrono.info/literatura.html ) Most unusual experience: Bashilov makes a very thorough revision of the entire history of the Russian state, beginning from the 13-th century (St. Alexander Nevsky) all the way to almost our times (he died in emigration, in Argentina, in 1970). Through and through, he keeps bashing what he calls "inobesie," the invasion of foreign hostile forces, mostly Freemasonic, into the course of Russian history. While I do realize that Bashilov's take on history is most subjective and even bordering on weird, it was very interesting for me to read Bashilov's sharply negative evaluation of some figures that I was indoctrinated to take as positive (e.g., Nikita Zotov, Lefort, P. Gordon, count Osterman, Antioch Kantemir, Sumarokov, Emperor Alexander I), and his generous praise of those whom I have been always used to take as negative (e.g. Emperors Paul I and Nicholas I).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on December 13, 2007, 11:02:39 PM
The upheavel of a move to Australia seems to have left me thoroughly happy, but mentally exhausted. As a consequence, I have given up struggling to read anything that even hints of effort. I am presently reading "The Chronicles of Chrestomanci", Volumes 1 and 2, by Diana Wynne Jones. I've only recently discovered Jones, (a student of both C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien) who is the very imaginative author of "Howl's Moving Castle" and many, many more.

The two books of the chronicles contain a total of four stories and are set (quoting the blurb on the back cover) "In the multiple parallel universe of the Twelve Related Worlds, only an enchanter with nine lives is powerful enough to control the rampant misuse of magic - and to hold the title Chrestomanci..."

The first book is such a thoroughly enjoyable read, I have ordered more. 

God be with us all.





 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on December 16, 2007, 07:39:48 PM
Diana Wynne Jones is wonderful.  I met her once at a Science Fiction convention outside of Boston years and years ago.  She can be quite funny, too.  I recommend the "Tough Guide to Fantasy" a volume set up like a travel guide book that has entries on the various common peoples, themes and items in fantasy books.  Then there's "Dirk of Darkholm" (sp?) which is sent in a world where "tours" from our world come through a la fantasy novels and Dirk, a nice familyman wizard is chosen to be that year's "Dark Lord" and his wife is to be the "Sorceress".

Where did you move to Australia *from*?

I was reading Civil War history for the last week of my class, and now I'll be going over the text before taking the final exam.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on December 17, 2007, 08:18:12 PM
Diana Wynne Jones is wonderful.  I met her once at a Science Fiction convention outside of Boston years and years ago.  She can be quite funny, too.  I recommend the "Tough Guide to Fantasy" a volume set up like a travel guide book that has entries on the various common peoples, themes and items in fantasy books.  Then there's "Dirk of Darkholm" (sp?) which is sent in a world where "tours" from our world come through a la fantasy novels and Dirk, a nice familyman wizard is chosen to be that year's "Dark Lord" and his wife is to be the "Sorceress".

I agree, her stories are wildly imaginative and humourous. I'm obviously going to be a great fan. I've already ordered Howl's Moving Castle and Conrad's Fate. A friend has suggested the "Tough Guide to Fantasy", which sounds like an interesting read, so I will probably get that next.

Having finished the first two books in one, I'm finding more and more of Diana Wynne Jones' "influence" in the Harry Potter books. I read somewhere that DWJ has noticed this, too.   

Quote
Where did you move to Australia *from*?

I consider myself fortunate enough to be part of the "great exodus" from New Zealand; along with hubby and cat/deity, who doesn't seem to be quite over the fact that Egyptians worshipped his kind.  ;D

The really great thing is that our younger daughter, her hubby and six kids moved with us. Had they not wanted to make the move as much as we did, we would still be in the "Land of the Long Grey Cloud".

God be with you.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on December 17, 2007, 09:05:18 PM
Re-reading The Silmarillion after watching all three extended edition Lord of the Rings films. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ian Lazarus on December 17, 2007, 09:21:30 PM
"The Zombie Survival Guide" for spiritual enlightenment.

And for light reading, "Moby Dick"
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: jayjay on December 18, 2007, 12:29:43 AM
"The Great War" by Les Carlyon - Great book on WW1

"The Law of God" - Second time round.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on December 18, 2007, 05:16:31 PM
"The Zombie Survival Guide" for spiritual enlightenment.

And for light reading, "Moby Dick"

 :laugh:

Ah, yes, Moby Dick, where Ishmael cuddles with Queequeg all night long and then the seamen blissfully squeeze sperm (oil) all day.....My college class had lots of fun with that book.
 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PeterTheAleut on December 19, 2007, 12:54:06 AM
:laugh:

Ah, yes, Moby Dick, where Ishmael cuddles with Queequeg all night long and then the seamen blissfully squeeze sperm (oil) all day.....My college class had lots of fun with that book.
 
I can see how the guys would get a lot of perverse glee out of this.  YIKES! :o
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ian Lazarus on December 19, 2007, 12:56:02 AM
Well, the title alone can be shocking to the unprepared mind.  I believe in future generations, it shall be called Mobey Richard
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on December 19, 2007, 06:17:23 PM
LOL
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on December 19, 2007, 06:47:12 PM
I've been savouring Pushkin's "History of Peter I" (http://www.hrono.info/libris/lib_p/push_petr1_02.html)

Here's one excerpt that gives an idea about "theological" discourses of those times...

Вскоре после того (?) стрельцы под предводительством расстриги попа Никиты производят новый мятеж, вторгаются в соборную церковь во время служения, изгоняют патриарха и духовенство, которое скрывается в Грановитую палату. Старый Хованский представляет патриарху и царям требования мятежников о словопрении с Никитой. Стрельцы входят с налоем и свечами и с каменьями за пазухой, подают царям челобитную. Начинается словопрение. Патриарх и холмогорский архиепископ Афанасий (бывший некогда раскольником) вступают в феологический спор. Настает шум, летят каменья (сказка о Петре, будто бы усмирившем смятение). Бояре при помощи стрельцов-нераскольников изгоняют наконец бешеных феологов. Никита и главные мятежники схвачены и казнены 6 июня.

(A short summary in English: In May 1681, Old Believer "theologians" came to debate "theology" to the Patriarch and brought with them stones hidden in the folds of their garments. In the midst of the "theology" debate these stones were put to use, so that the armed guards (the loyal "strel'tsy") had to be called in and end the "debate." The "rabid theologians" (Pushkin's term) were eventually, after much fight, pushed out from the Patriarch's palace. On June 6,  the leader of the "theology" "debate" from the Old Believers' side, a priest called Nikita, and a few others were seized and executed.)  ::)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on December 23, 2007, 01:33:11 AM
I consider myself fortunate enough to be part of the "great exodus" from New Zealand; along with hubby and cat/deity, who doesn't seem to be quite over the fact that Egyptians worshipped his kind.  ;D

The really great thing is that our younger daughter, her hubby and six kids moved with us. Had they not wanted to make the move as much as we did, we would still be in the "Land of the Long Grey Cloud".

Ah.  I didn't know that there was an "exodus" from New Zealand.  I'd read some time back that there were a number of folks who wanted to move there.

"long grey cloud"?  I reckon that's  a take on Aotearoa and "white cloud" or is that a mistranslation?  I'm just curious.

I'm glad you like DWJ.  She's quite good.

I'm done with my American History Class, so I'm reading more of other books.  I'm leafing though Tales of Ise a translated Japanese work from around the earlier Heian era. 

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on December 23, 2007, 02:58:47 AM
Quote
"long grey cloud"?  I reckon that's  a take on Aotearoa and "white cloud" or is that a mistranslation?  I'm just curious.

Yes, my own take on the "white cloud", because it seems to rain incessantly. The Maoris must have sighted NZ on a good day. :)

Quote
I'm glad you like DWJ.  She's quite good.

I wonder it took so long for me to discover DWJ; now that I have, I'm rather taken with her.



Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Carpatho Russian on January 11, 2008, 10:38:37 PM
This evening, I started reading Nicholas Afanasiev, The Church of the Holy Spirit.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: AMM on January 11, 2008, 11:15:32 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Icon-Axe-Interpretive-History-Russian/dp/0394708466
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on January 12, 2008, 01:14:14 AM
Just finished reading "Howl's Moving Castle" and "Conrad's Fate" by Diana Wynne Jones. I've run out of her books to read. :( Oh well, now I'll start on "Finding Darwin's God" by Ken Miller.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on January 12, 2008, 01:49:39 AM
Along with The Eucharist by Fr. Schmemann, I'm reading The Grapes of Wrath by my favorite American author, John Steinbeck.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Órëlaurëa on January 14, 2008, 11:29:55 AM
How funny. . . I'm reading Howl's Moving Castle too! I expect to have that finished in another hour or so. Then I'll read The Ladies of Grace Adieu (collection of short stories) by Susanna Clarke. After that I need to get reading the Eucharist, and after that I've promised to read Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on January 14, 2008, 12:38:16 PM
I just finished Howl myself last week.  Currently I'm reading Your Baby's First Year and being a paranoid mom over every squeak, grunt, and cry Cait makes.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: FrChris on January 14, 2008, 12:45:56 PM
I just finished Howl myself last week.  Currently I'm reading Your Baby's First Year and being a paranoid mom over every squeak, grunt, and cry Cait makes.

Ah, yes, I remember those days! Have you ran into Cait's room in 'panic mode' the first night she slept through it yet? I know I did!

Currently I'm reading Eshbach's Handbook of Engineering Fundamentals as well as Harold Wass' Sprinkler Hydraulics, reminiscing about my pre-priest life and how simple it once was... ::)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on January 14, 2008, 01:48:22 PM
Then I'll read The Ladies of Grace Adieu (collection of short stories) by Susanna Clarke. After that I need to get reading the Eucharist, and after that I've promised to read Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. 

Do you mind telling us how you like The Ladies of Grace Adieu when you're finished?  Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell is one of my favorite books so I was thinking of picking up The Ladies...

Currently starting to read a book I picked up last year and have not gotten around to- The Stolen Child by Keith Donohue.

Is there anyone who can read Latin and translate the following please:  "There exist in this world a range of sublunary spirits that carminibus coelo possunt deducere lunam..."   (I just hate it when authors put in lines of french, latin, spanish, whatever and don't give a translation somewhere.  This is on Page 1, Chapter 1, so I hope the rest of the book isn't going to continue this trend).

Thanks

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on January 14, 2008, 01:58:42 PM
Ah, yes, I remember those days! Have you ran into Cait's room in 'panic mode' the first night she slept through it yet? I know I did!

Oh yeah.  Sneaking to her crib to hover over her and see if she's still breathing when she's been too quiet for too long is a pasttime at our house.  :P  Incidentally, she's slept through the last two nights in a row.  (WOOHOO!)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: augustin717 on January 14, 2008, 02:45:06 PM
Quote
Is there anyone who can read Latin and translate the following please:  "There exist in this world a range of sublunary spirits that carminibus coelo possunt deducere lunam..."   (I just hate it when authors put in lines of french, latin, spanish, whatever and don't give a translation somewhere.
 

"through incantations can lead the moon off the sky."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on January 14, 2008, 03:51:14 PM
  "through incantations can lead the moon off the sky."

Thank you so much Augustin!  That helps a lot. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Órëlaurëa on January 14, 2008, 05:11:20 PM
Do you mind telling us how you like The Ladies of Grace Adieu when you're finished?  Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell is one of my favorite books so I was thinking of picking up The Ladies...

I shall be happy to! I just finished Howl a little bit ago, and will be starting to read the other in a few minutes. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on January 15, 2008, 12:09:15 PM
I just finished Howl myself last week.  Currently I'm reading Your Baby's First Year and being a paranoid mom over every squeak, grunt, and cry Cait makes.

Perfectly normal.  We were like that with our 3 and yes, we had the same reaction to the sleeping through the night "Is he/she dead?!?".  Then they would have nights where they *didn't* sleep through so that we wouldn't get complacent or something like that.  :)

I quite liked the stories in The Ladies of Grace Adieu.  I read that before starting Strange/Norell

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on January 15, 2008, 01:48:59 PM
I imagine by the time I get used to her sleeping that well she's go through a growth spurt and keep me up all night for a week or so.  They know when they're slipping out of the center of attention!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on January 16, 2008, 02:19:18 PM
They know when they're slipping out of the center of attention!

You can be sure some children know exactly how to stay the center of attention, especially the second or middle ones.  My 5 yo thinks any songs with the word "poop, poopoohead, butt", you get the picture are sure to draw attention.  He did have a rather funny one he kept singing on a car trip recently we called "Udders".   

  "I love my udders, udders, udders, love my udders, udders, udders"   

Funny the first or second time, not the 25th. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on January 16, 2008, 03:21:28 PM
LOL!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on January 16, 2008, 05:14:06 PM
That's what I get for nursing him till he was almost 3 yo!  His best one - "Mommy that cow has breasts just like you".
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on January 16, 2008, 05:18:04 PM
Ouch.   :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on January 16, 2008, 07:18:23 PM
That's what I get for nursing him till he was almost 3 yo!  His best one - "Mommy that cow has breasts just like you".

LOL - Don't you wish that you could buy gags for kids? Kind of makes you long for the good old days when children were "seen and not heard". ;D

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on January 16, 2008, 07:20:11 PM
I refuse to believe there was any time when children were not heard. :o
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on January 16, 2008, 08:03:27 PM
I'm still hoping there was just one day the Mother of God had to take the Lord out of the Temple for acting up. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on January 16, 2008, 08:35:42 PM
I refuse to believe there was any time when children were not heard. :o

Over the course of history there have been some pretty draconion child-rearing techniques; where children were definitely seen and not heard unless they wished to suffer particularly nasty consquences. 

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on January 16, 2008, 08:51:20 PM
True. I meant only that my own can be rather loud when she wants to be. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on January 16, 2008, 08:58:15 PM
True. I meant only that my own can be rather loud when she wants to be. :)

ytterbiumanalyst,

And thank God that she is!  ;D Thank God we don't have to confirm to rigid social restraints where our children can't be themselves once in a while. Of course, I'm not advocating no discipline, but who would want to go back to the "good old days" really?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on January 16, 2008, 08:59:35 PM
Though to save us from embarrassment, a little duct tape would go a long way.  :D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on January 17, 2008, 03:35:15 PM
LOL!  Yep, she's got lungs for sure.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: The Iambic Pen on January 17, 2008, 05:24:52 PM
I just started reading An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, by John Henry Cardinal Newman.  After I finish, just to balance things out, I plan to read Bishop Ware's The Orthodox Church.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on January 19, 2008, 06:16:48 PM
I've split off the cat conversation to the Other Topics board under this link:  http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php?topic=14382.0.  --EofK   
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BrotherAidan on January 19, 2008, 11:43:34 PM
"Three views of Orthodoxy and Evangelicalism"; there are five or six different contributors; each writes an essay and all the others critique it and then the original writer gets a rebuttal. For former evangelicals it is an excellent clarifier of what one has left and why, free of the sometimes animosity converts sometimes have toward their past. For cradles it offers a clear view of several "flavors" of protestant evangelicals, free of the stereotyping and strawmen and just really ridiculous over-simplifying of evangelical protestant  doctrinal positions. The Orthodox contributors do quite an excellent job presenting their positions. It is an excellent book and I would recommend it to all. I think Zondervan is the publisher.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Andrew21091 on January 27, 2008, 05:19:47 PM
Just finished Father Seraphim Rose: His Life and Works and it was a fantastic book. Now I'm reading New Confessors of Russia Vol.1, Nizhny-Novgorod Province.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on January 27, 2008, 06:17:05 PM
I've decided to get my M.E. degree, so this week I've begun Classroom Management: Models, Applications, and Cases by Manning and Bucher for my first class. As far as textbooks go, it's pretty good. I've noticed that most education textbooks are easier to study from than those of other disciplines. Maybe it's because they know teachers will be reading them. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on January 28, 2008, 01:12:33 PM
If schedules go as planned I should finish a collection of Dostoyevsky's short novels this week and then begin his Poor Folks - the only major work of his I've not read at least once. After this I will take a break from the Big D.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jimmy on January 28, 2008, 02:03:40 PM
The Federalist Papers.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Athanasios on January 28, 2008, 05:27:36 PM
Hello,

The Federalist Papers.

If you like that, you'll probably also like the Anti-Federalist Papers. That is the viewpoint of the other major side of the story.  ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on February 06, 2008, 07:03:51 PM
Just received my copy of "There is a God: How the World's Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind" (http://www.crossroadbooks.com.au/index.php?products_id=1041&option=com_oscommerce&osMod=product_info&osCsid=63f92dcf5dc60bbfa97536b55338cd9) By Antony Flew.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on March 06, 2008, 03:21:41 PM
Just placed a Light & Life order for myself and hope to start reading:

Orthodox Spirituality: A Practical Guide for the Faithful and a Definitive       Guide for the Scholar by Dumitru Staniloae

Mary, The Untrodden Portal

The Incarnate God:  Feasts of Jesus and The Virgin Mary (2 vol)

and two booklets on the Jesus Prayer.

(I don't know why I do this - I still haven't finished The Eucharist, The Divine Liturgy by Wybrew and at least 2 dozen other books.  I know what I'm "giving up" for Lent - my book buying addiction.)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on March 07, 2008, 02:35:17 AM
Just placed a Light & Life order for myself and hope to start reading:

Orthodox Spirituality: A Practical Guide for the Faithful and a Definitive       Guide for the Scholar by Dumitru Staniloae

Mary, The Untrodden Portal

The Incarnate God:  Feasts of Jesus and The Virgin Mary (2 vol)

and two booklets on the Jesus Prayer.

(I don't know why I do this - I still haven't finished The Eucharist, The Divine Liturgy by Wybrew and at least 2 dozen other books.  I know what I'm "giving up" for Lent - my book buying addiction.)

Tina,

I do exactly the same thing. I have a stack of books started and disgarded (to finish at some time!) and I still buy more. Today, I received a copy of "Christ the Eternal Tao". Last week I bought three Falco books (private investigator stories set in ancient Rome) and "Power of Three"'; another Dianna Wynne Jones. This is indeed an illness!! I need help! 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on March 07, 2008, 11:57:11 AM
Class assignments for "Modern Poetry". This week it was Marianne Moore and T. S. Eliot.  I'd never read "The Waste Land" before, though I had read "Prufrock" and some others.  Last week it was Ezra Pound and H.D. and Jeffers.  and I had to write a paper and chose Wallace Stevens' "Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird"

A book on Japanese relations and ideas about Hawaii, including fiction from the early 20th century that had the islands as part of Japan, and various plans during the war for taking over, which would have been a great blow to the US by removing a naval repair/refuel depot.

and others

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on March 07, 2008, 03:19:49 PM
Tina,

I do exactly the same thing. I have a stack of books started and disgarded (to finish at some time!) and I still buy more. Today, I received a copy of "Christ the Eternal Tao". Last week I bought three Falco books (private investigator stories set in ancient Rome) and "Power of Three"'; another Dianna Wynne Jones. This is indeed an illness!! I need help! 

R- The 12 Step program for book buying addicts means simply turning around at the door of Barnes & Noble and walking 12 paces out the door.  Tell me how you like Christ the Eternal Tao. It's one I've wanted to read for a while now since I've gotten into martial arts.  If you're like me though, you end up reading the "fun" books faster and more consistently than the "serious" church books. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Veniamin on March 07, 2008, 03:24:59 PM
I've decided to get my M.E. degree,

I thought we all had one of those.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on March 07, 2008, 03:42:53 PM
Nearing the end of the Ladder of St. John.  I've got further this year than I did last year and it looks like I'll finish it. :)

I'm also reading the "A Lion's Tale", the autobiography of wrestler Chris Jericho.  Once that's finished (quick, quick read!), I'll be starting "Sword Song" by Bernard Cornwell (one of my favorite authors).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on March 07, 2008, 06:54:13 PM
I recently finished a collection of short stories by H.P. Lovecraft and have started Made in America by Bill Bryson.  Comedy's a nice relief after terrifying myself with Old Ones. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on March 07, 2008, 07:40:34 PM
R- The 12 Step program for book buying addicts means simply turning around at the door of Barnes & Noble and walking 12 paces out the door.  Tell me how you like Christ the Eternal Tao. It's one I've wanted to read for a while now since I've gotten into martial arts.  If you're like me though, you end up reading the "fun" books faster and more consistently than the "serious" church books. 

I was in Borders the other day and bought yet another Cookbook, which I need like I need a hole in my head! One positive thing about the sojourn through Border's though, I bought a disk on Tai Chi. It's so graceful and I have been meaning to incorporate it into my keeping fit programme, but darn, it's harder than it looks! Being slow to catch on, I will take awhile to learn the first few movements.

And yes, I will read all the "fun" books before the more "serious". I read the introduction of "Christ the Eternal Tao" last evening. Looks good, but now I have come upon several chapters of poetry, something I'm not really all that patient with. I'm tempted to skip it as I usually do and get to the informative stuff. :( 

God grant me patience and do it now! :P

 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on March 07, 2008, 08:51:31 PM
I was in Borders the other day and bought yet another Cookbook, which I need like I need a hole in my head! One positive thing about the sojourn through Border's though, I bought a disk on Tai Chi. It's so graceful and I have been meaning to incorporate it into my keeping fit programme, but darn, it's harder than it looks! Being slow to catch on, I will take awhile to learn the first few movements.

And yes, I will read all the "fun" books before the more "serious". I read the introduction of "Christ the Eternal Tao" last evening. Looks good, but now I have come upon several chapters of poetry, something I'm not really all that patient with. I'm tempted to skip it as I usually do and get to the informative stuff. :( 


I think tai chi is going to quickly catch up with yoga in the US.  I'm really glad you are enjoying it so much.  A caution about tai chi on video though - it's very hard to learn correctly, it's hard to keep motivated without a class to participate in and you quickly get bored doing one Yang 24 routine over and over.   I've been doing the kung fu internal arts (tai chi, pa kua, weapons etc..) for 2 years now and a well run class is the way to go.  I will test into 3rd brown sash in a few months and then 1st black sash by the end of the year or early next.  The school has been what's kept me in for so long.  The variety, the challenge of testing, the comraderie.  It's been the best exercise program I've ever done and I've met so many wonderful people.  The benefit of learning with a martial arts instructor, is that you learn tai chi and the other internal forms as a martial art not just as an exercise program.  I used to think it was just a pretty Chinese ballet type dance form but it is a serious martial art.  The Yang forms are slow (but oh so hard to master at the correct speed with proper balance),  but when you get into the Chen forms, the different animal pa kua forms and weapons they are fast and use explosive power (hua ching) for very hard hits and strikes.  An instructor will also teach you proper breathing and meditation techniques to use, which really make a difference in your ability to concentrate and increase your power.  Good luck with this, and please feel free to PM me with any questions.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on March 07, 2008, 09:19:57 PM
R- The 12 Step program for book buying addicts means simply turning around at the door of Barnes & Noble and walking 12 paces out the door. 


 :D :D :D  Only twelve paces?  Not far at all.... and close enough that the pull of fresh pages, the smell of paper or maybe that special dust that only seems to collect in used book shops to reach out and pull you back.

Somewhere around here I have a humourous book on Bibliophilia/Bibliomania... but at the moment I can't recall the exact title.  :D  I can see the cover in my mind though.  It has such useful bits as techniques for bringing books into the house undetected (under ones coat, in a backpack etc) and a question list to judge how back a case one has, that asks such things as have you bought a book and found that you already have copy/ies? 

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on March 07, 2008, 09:29:46 PM
A woman's #1 technique for sneaking anything into the house (new clothes, books, shoes) - leave it in your trunk for a day or so, and do not bring it into the house in the plastic bag from the store.  The crinkley sound of shopping bags is a dead giveaway that you have been shopping.  Sneak the item into your closet or bookshelf and do not wear or bring it out for several days.  However, in the most cases, your husband is so clueless about anything you are wearing or reading, that unless you left the tags on, (or in the case of clothing/shoes and it is so revealing or hoochey) they are very unlikely to notice anyway (and in the case of the aforementioned clothing items, they might actually not care how much you spent on them).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on March 07, 2008, 09:45:37 PM
I think tai chi is going to quickly catch up with yoga in the US.  I'm really glad you are enjoying it so much.  A caution about tai chi on video though - it's very hard to learn correctly, it's hard to keep motivated without a class to participate in and you quickly get bored doing one Yang 24 routine over and over.   I've been doing the kung fu internal arts (tai chi, pa kua, weapons etc..) for 2 years now and a well run class is the way to go.  I will test into 3rd brown sash in a few months and then 1st black sash by the end of the year or early next.  The school has been what's kept me in for so long.  The variety, the challenge of testing, the comraderie.  It's been the best exercise program I've ever done and I've met so many wonderful people.  The benefit of learning with a martial arts instructor, is that you learn tai chi and the other internal forms as a martial art not just as an exercise program.  I used to think it was just a pretty Chinese ballet type dance form but it is a serious martial art.  The Yang forms are slow (but oh so hard to master at the correct speed with proper balance),  but when you get into the Chen forms, the different animal pa kua forms and weapons they are fast and use explosive power (hua ching) for very hard hits and strikes.  An instructor will also teach you proper breathing and meditation techniques to use, which really make a difference in your ability to concentrate and increase your power.  Good luck with this, and please feel free to PM me with any questions.

Thanks Tina. I'm investigating the posibilities of a group near my home, but so far, nothing.  :(
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PeterTheAleut on March 08, 2008, 03:52:41 AM
Well, Great Lent is upon us again, so I guess I need to dust off and start rereading my copy of Lord of the Rings.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on March 08, 2008, 11:49:04 AM
Have you ever read any of the "History of Middle Earth" volumes?  or "The Silmarillion", and "The Children of Hurin" came out a few months ago, too.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PeterTheAleut on March 08, 2008, 03:41:41 PM
Have you ever read any of the "History of Middle Earth" volumes?  or "The Silmarillion", and "The Children of Hurin" came out a few months ago, too.

Ebor
I've read the Silmarillion a few times.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on March 08, 2008, 03:55:09 PM
As Great Lent is now around the corner, my books to (re)read are the following:

1)  The Way of the Pilgrim
2)  Confessions of St. Augustine
3)  Great Lent by Fr. Schmemann

If anyone has other Lenten favorites and meditations, please post them here.  Thanks.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on March 08, 2008, 08:41:52 PM
I'm going to try to finish "Christ, the Eternal Tao" (which is looking very promising so far), then I'll try to finish "My Life in Christ" and hopefully start "Light from the East: Theology, Science and the Eastern Orthodox Tradition".
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on March 08, 2008, 10:53:29 PM
As Great Lent is now around the corner, my books to (re)read are the following:

1)  The Way of the Pilgrim
2)  Confessions of St. Augustine
3)  Great Lent by Fr. Schmemann

If anyone has other Lenten favorites and meditations, please post them here.  Thanks.
Ladder of Divine Ascent St. John Klimacos
The Path of Salvation St. Theopan the Recluse
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: stanley123 on March 08, 2008, 11:51:47 PM
Just received my copy of "There is a God: How the World's Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind" (http://www.crossroadbooks.com.au/index.php?products_id=1041&option=com_oscommerce&osMod=product_info&osCsid=63f92dcf5dc60bbfa97536b55338cd9) By Antony Flew.
An interesting book, but was it actually written by Mr. Antony Flew?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on March 19, 2008, 02:27:03 PM
Found an extremely interesting book online, titled "The [life and] Activities of the Metropolitan Petro Mohyla" (unfortunately for most of you guys, in Ukrainian - http://www.apologet.kiev.ua/content/view/70/35/), by a historian and Orthodox priest, Protopresbyter Fr. Dmytro Sadovyak. It's my spring break, so I took time savoring it.

I am fascinated by Mohyla's personality. He was, of course, a true product of his age - extremely ambitious, often ruthless... Yet, it is amazing how much he has achieved, given that he lived only 50 years (1596-1647).

Mohyla was born and lived all his life with more than just a silver spoon in his mouth. He was a son of the ruling prince ("Hospodar") of Moldova. Being still very young, he also became the brother-in-law of the powerful prince Jeremiah (Yarema) Vishnevetsky of Romny (east-central Ukraine). Having chosen a monastic path, Mohyla was made the archimandrite of the most wealthy Kyiv-Pechers'k Lavra monastery when he was not yet 31. He became Metropolitan of Kyiv and the Exarch of the Eucumenical Patriarch Cyril (Lukaris) at the age of 36.

Educated in Western Europe, Latin was his "other first" language, together with his "first first" language, which was old Ukrainian ("mova Rus'ka"). Writing, speaking, acting very much like a Polish nobleman-"shlyakhtych" of his time, and yet being Orthodox to the bone, always seeking compromise with the Polish king and princes for the sake of peace and prosperity of Orthodoxy, Mohyla wrote and published books, opened new schools and academies, appointed hierarchs, and vigorously re-organized parishes. During his tenure, hundreds of parishes and dozens of "protopopias" all over Ukraine were rid of illiterate and morally un-befitting priests and deacons (all of whom, according to Mohyla's personal orders, retained their pay for life if they collaborated in the search of their more educated and fitting replacement).

As it often happens, being a strong, somewhat dominant personality, Mohyla, unfortunately, had many enemies, including (most unfortunately) a wonderful man, his predecessor on the throne of the Metropolitan of Kyiv, Vlad. Isaiah Kopyns'kyj; Bishop Ian Popel'; prince Alexander Sangushko; the mayor of Kyiv Tyshkevych, and others. At times, he had sharp collisions with clergy, monks, and with the Kossaks who (again, very unfortunately) regarded him as a foreigner, "Westerner," "Latin" and even an undercover Catholic.

To this day, the true legacy of this most extraordinary man remains controversial and perhaps often misunderstood. No doubt, though, that he was a big blessing for Ukraine and for Holy Orthodoxy.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on March 19, 2008, 03:20:33 PM
I'm reading a young adult sci-fi novel: Alas, Babylon.  I originally read it in 9th grade I've spent years searching for it without knowing the title or author and *finally* found it by accident.  Yay.  It's not as gripping as I remember, though.  :( 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Psalti Boy on March 19, 2008, 04:15:53 PM
Unread posts on OCnet since my last visit.    ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on April 10, 2008, 08:34:37 AM
Just started:
Dimitry - Tsar and Great Prince of All Russia 1605-1606 by Philip Barbour
(Alternate title: Dimitry called the Pretender)

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on April 10, 2008, 08:48:48 AM
Still slogging my way through The Eucharist by Fr. Alexander Schmemann, The Lenten Spring by Hopko, and trying to read the Psalter.  I always have big plans for Great Lent that usually go uncompleted.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on April 10, 2008, 12:20:27 PM
I finally got my hands on a copy of Christ the Eternal Tao but have had little time to read it since I've been taking care of a 5 month old with an ear infection. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on April 10, 2008, 12:27:34 PM
Still slogging my way through The Eucharist by Fr. Alexander Schmemann, The Lenten Spring by Hopko, and trying to read the Psalter.  I always have big plans for Great Lent that usually go uncompleted.

I know the feeling.  Just keep at it as best you can and don't despair like I always end up doing when my big spiritual plans fall through! :)

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on April 10, 2008, 12:29:44 PM
I'm reading the Silmarillion (for the umpteenth time) for my before sleep reading and finally delving into Pope John Paul II's "Theology of the Body" general audience reflections during the day/lunch/train ride.

I do believe I'll start on Michael Chabon's iThe Yiddish Policeman's Union once I've finished the Silmarillion.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on April 14, 2008, 06:17:21 PM
Still working on "Clarissa."  I've been speeding through it lately because it's hit the climactic sections, but I still have almost 500 pages to go.  One of these days I'll get it finished.  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on April 14, 2008, 10:20:30 PM
And still slogging through The Eucharist by Schmemann.  Am I too dense or do I sometimes fail to see the point of the book for all the wordiness?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PeterTheAleut on April 14, 2008, 11:09:39 PM
I'm reading the Silmarillion (for the umpteenth time) for my before sleep reading ...
I'm in the middle of my fifth annual spring reading of Lord of the Rings; just read the first chapter of Return of the King today.  Should be into Book VI, Chapter 3 ("Mount Doom") on the 25th before I take a break for a couple of days.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on April 14, 2008, 11:11:56 PM
And still slogging through The Eucharist by Schmemann.  Am I too dense or do I sometimes fail to see the point of the book for all the wordiness?

I don't think it's just you.  There seems to have been a lack of interest in finishing the book at the Book Club thread.  Feel free to post your thoughts there!  I've been stuck on chapter three for a month now.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 02, 2008, 01:53:39 AM
I've read everything but that I intended to read during Lent, which is usual for me. ::) Anyway, I'm in the middle of Anam Cara by John O'Donohue; Irish Catholic, philosopher and ex-priest. Parts of the book are very moving, especially Mr Donohue's chapter on death - which I skipped ahead to read, for some reason. Reading his view on death has been all the more meaningful since I have discovered that Mr Donohue suddenly passed away in his sleep earlier this year at the age of 52. Lord have mercy.

From Amazon: Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom offers an exploration of the secret universe we all carry inside us, the connections we forge with the worlds of our friends and loved ones, and the products of our worlds reflected in the things we create outside of ourselves. Anam Cara, Gaelic for "soul friend," is an ancient journey down a nearly forgotten path of wisdom into what it means to be human. Drawing on this age-old perspective, John O'Donohue helps us to see ourselves as the Celts did: we're more than just flesh, blood, and bone; we comprise individual worlds. The comprehension of the sublime architecture of the worlds we are born with will engender a new appreciation for the outside world and the way we contribute to its evolution.

http://www.amazon.com/Anam-Cara-Book-Celtic-Wisdom/dp/006092943X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209706868&sr=1-1
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on May 02, 2008, 05:43:04 PM
Carnage and Culture by Victor Davis Hanson.  Prof. Hanson is a Classics Professor at UC-Berekley (or at least was) and has authored other books as Who Killed Homer? (which earned him a lot of negative press in my profession) and The Western Way of War.  This book seeks to explain that a western way of war has created a western culture or at least quasi-western culture worldwide.  It is a very good read and I would wholeheartedly recommend it.  Contrary to what people may infer about its title, it is not a racist book nor does it degrade other non-western cultures.  Funny thing is that I have had this book for a couple of years now and I have only now gotten around to reading it.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 02, 2008, 06:23:33 PM
Sorry, lunacy struck and I misposted.  ???
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on May 15, 2008, 04:04:10 AM
I recently finished The Evil Dead Companion by Bill Warren. It was a bit of a let down for me. Evil Dead is my favorite movie trilogy, but a large chunk of the book was simply biographical info about the director Sam Raimi (and to a lesser extent Bruce Campbell and others). Right now I'm in sort of a holding pattern while I wait for some books by John Hick and Bishop Spong to arrive.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on May 15, 2008, 12:40:45 PM
I think I'll have to teach myself to read again after Caitlin's older.  The last thing I read was H.P. Lovecraft's At the Mountains of Madness a couple of months ago.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 15, 2008, 12:58:47 PM
I just finished Vladimir Lossky's "Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church" (in Russian, http://www.wco.ru/biblio/books/lossk1/Main.htm). Took me quite a while, it's not an easy reading, but I really enjoyed it. I had a very vague idea about the Chalcedon christological dogmat and absolutely no idea about the uncreated Divine energies before I read this book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on May 15, 2008, 01:36:47 PM
I have already read the Orthodox Church by Metropolitan Ware. I think I'll check out the Orthodox Way.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aurelia on May 16, 2008, 03:51:19 PM
Parenting by the Book by John Rosemond
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on May 16, 2008, 04:09:32 PM
Ron Paul's The Revolution:  A Manifesto.  If you actually care about small governemnt, non-interventionist government, sensible politics at its finest, this book is for you.  Though this man will never be elected president, this book shows why he should, at the very least, be strongly considered.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on May 16, 2008, 09:01:38 PM
I think I'll have to teach myself to read again after Caitlin's older.  The last thing I read was H.P. Lovecraft's At the Mountains of Madness a couple of months ago.

When I first read Lovecraft, I could only handle one book every few months.  Let me tell you, reading him alone in a big Philly row-house and having the phone ring waaaaay in the back where it's dark can be a bit nerve-wracking.  ;)

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on May 16, 2008, 09:04:10 PM
^Oh, definitely!  I made the mistake of reading the book I mentioned when our daughter was still waking up to eat every two hours at night and the story was so good I couldn't help read it... even at 3 am in a quiet, dark house.  I can't count the times I had to cross myself walking down our the hallway back to bed!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 16, 2008, 09:21:37 PM
^Oh, definitely!  I made the mistake of reading the book I mentioned when our daughter was still waking up to eat every two hours at night and the story was so good I couldn't help read it... even at 3 am in a quiet, dark house.  I can't count the times I had to cross myself walking down our the hallway back to bed!

I remember making the mistake of reading Bram Stoker's "Dracula" one night while on a train heading for London. At that time, station guards had a habit of pounding on a random carriage to alert the driver that all passengers had boarded and he could take off. The guard just happened to pick my carriage to pound on, where I was alone with my book. I nearly died of shock! But that book is still one of my favourites.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on May 16, 2008, 09:28:53 PM
Oh wow!  I would have had a heart attack!   :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 16, 2008, 09:56:33 PM
Let me tell you; it was a close call!  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on May 16, 2008, 10:57:32 PM
^Oh, definitely!  I made the mistake of reading the book I mentioned when our daughter was still waking up to eat every two hours at night and the story was so good I couldn't help read it... even at 3 am in a quiet, dark house.  I can't count the times I had to cross myself walking down our the hallway back to bed!

Lovecraft had a amazing way of setting up eldritch situations and nameless horrors, didn't he? 

Did you know that he was also very fond of cats?  Here is a link to an essay he wrote:
http://terror.snm-hgkz.ch/lovecraft/html/catsdogs.htm

I love the line

"I have no active dislike for dogs, any more than I have for monkeys, human beings, tradesmen, cows, sheep, or pterodactyls; but for the cat I have entertained a particular respect and affection ever since the earliest days of my infancy."

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on May 16, 2008, 11:08:36 PM
^Yay on cat fans!  The one thing I don't much like in Lovecraft's works is that he needed a thesaurus.  He kept using "nameless" way too much and after a few chapters, that feels like getting too lazy to describe things properly.  Otherwise, he's a very imaginative writer.  And much like Stephen King, I would hate to see the inside of his mind. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on May 16, 2008, 11:20:29 PM
^Yay on cat fans!  The one thing I don't much like in Lovecraft's works is that he needed a thesaurus.  He kept using "nameless" way too much and after a few chapters, that feels like getting too lazy to describe things properly.  Otherwise, he's a very imaginative writer.  And much like Stephen King, I would hate to see the inside of his mind. 

When someone is coming up with things like Nyarlathotep and Cthulhu and Yog-Sothoth (sp?) there may have been times when he couldn't bear another named horror. :D  Then again, long ago a friend described a bit of Lovecraft as "I beheld an indescribable horror... which I will now describe for 3 pages." 

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on May 17, 2008, 12:58:06 AM
Any Steinbeck fans out there?  He's probably my favorite American author.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on May 17, 2008, 02:05:57 AM
Yes
Any Steinbeck fans out there?  He's probably my favorite American author.
. Yes, here. But Hemingway is probably mine.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 17, 2008, 02:40:38 AM
Any Steinbeck fans out there?  He's probably my favorite American author.

I like Steinbeck very much, although reading his dialect ridden dialogues are a bit of a chore.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 17, 2008, 02:43:24 AM
Yes. Yes, here. But Hemingway is probably mine.

I love Hemingway's terse narrative. I loved "Fairwell to Arms"...... not quite sure why.  ???
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on May 17, 2008, 12:00:45 PM
Any Steinbeck fans out there?  He's probably my favorite American author.

Really now? I remember reading East of Eden in High School and thinking, "will this book ever end?" LOL. I am sure I would have a greater appreciation for it now if I read it.  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on May 18, 2008, 11:29:34 PM
I like Steinbeck very much, although reading his dialect ridden dialogues are a bit of a chore.
Probably one of the reasons I love his works;  It reminds me of my grandparents and older kinfolk.  People still talk like that here in the Ozarks if you know where to look.  It's the lyrical, twangy, honest, salt-of-the-earth speech of rural folks and I love it.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on May 18, 2008, 11:38:29 PM
Yes. Yes, here. But Hemingway is probably mine.

I love Hemingway's terse narrative. I loved "Fairwell to Arms"...... not quite sure why.  ???

I liked Hemingway, but his terseness and narrative style always seems anxious, uptight, and impatient.  Kinda reminds me of a big city person visiting a small town; rush, rush, rush 'cause my way's faster and better.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 18, 2008, 11:47:53 PM
Probably one of the reasons I love his works;  It reminds me of my grandparents and older kinfolk.  People still talk like that here in the Ozarks if you know where to look.  It's the lyrical, twangy, honest, salt-of-the-earth speech of rural folks and I love it.

I have to admit, it's sort of foreign to me.  :D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 18, 2008, 11:51:44 PM
I liked Hemingway, but his terseness and narrative style always seems anxious, uptight, and impatient.  Kinda reminds me of a big city person visiting a small town; rush, rush, rush 'cause my way's faster and better.

Yes, that is so true. Something funny; I once bought "For Whom the Bell Tolls" in a second-hand bookstore and when I got home I was infuriated that that particular version had replaced every expletive with "unrepeatable word" or something similar. Grrrrrrrrrrr  >:( That totally ruined the story for me and I didn't finish it. I hired the film, instead!  :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on May 19, 2008, 12:09:15 AM
I have to admit, it's sort of foreign to me.  :D
Don' worry yaself none.  Ah reckin we Ozarkians sound a might bit foreign to the rest of the country some tahms. :D  Here's a might fine article that tells about it.  Scroll on down to where it talks about the Ozarks.
 Southern American English.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_American_English)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 19, 2008, 12:13:16 AM
Don' worry yaself none.  Ah reckin we Ozarkians sound a might bit foreign to the rest of the country some tahms. :D  Here's a might fine article that tells about it.  Scroll on down to where it talks about the Ozarks.
 Southern American English.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_American_English)

And you have the nerve to call that English!!!  :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on May 19, 2008, 12:18:48 AM
And you have the nerve to call that English!!!  :laugh:
LOL! :D Not me, I proudly call it Hillbilly.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 19, 2008, 01:12:36 AM
LOL! :D Not me, I proudly call it Hillbilly.

LOL - why do I have the "banjo duel" playing in my mind?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on May 19, 2008, 01:37:36 AM
I liked Hemingway, but his terseness and narrative style always seems anxious, uptight, and impatient.  Kinda reminds me of a big city person visiting a small town; rush, rush, rush 'cause my way's faster and better.

Funny...that's the way I feel about Faulkner, not Hemingway.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on May 19, 2008, 01:47:51 AM
LOL - why do I have the "banjo duel" playing in my mind?
Ha ha. :D You're thinking of some backwoods, Georgia Appalachian boys.  (And no offense to any backwoods, Georgia Appalachian boys.) ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on May 19, 2008, 01:52:33 AM
Funny...that's the way I feel about Faulkner, not Hemingway.
Faulkner?  Impatient?  He's slower than a glass of molasses on in January.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 19, 2008, 01:57:05 AM
Ha ha. :D You're thinking of some backwoods, Georgia Appalachian boys.  (And no offense to any backwoods, Georgia Appalachian boys.) ;D

Oh dear, it's all the same to my untrained ear!  :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on May 19, 2008, 02:34:33 AM
Then there's Saul Bellow...never understood the the fascination some had with him.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on May 19, 2008, 10:23:50 AM
Faulkner?  Impatient?  He's slower than a glass of molasses on in January.

Agreed.  I attempted to read Absalom, Absalom in college and made it through the first paragraph.  Which extended into page three.   :o
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on May 19, 2008, 12:22:03 PM
My favorite Steinbeck work is Cannery Row.  His characters are described so richly and descriptively that it's easy to 'see' them.  He understands the human condition very well and I think most people can identify with at least parts of his characters or at least his narrative.   
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 19, 2008, 10:08:41 PM
Agreed.  I attempted to read Absalom, Absalom in college and made it through the first paragraph.  Which extended into page three.   :o

My goodness, that's worse than Dickens!  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on May 20, 2008, 03:55:37 AM
Hey, I like Dickens. But I thought our tangent was on American authors.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 20, 2008, 04:05:08 AM
Hey, I like Dickens. But I thought our tangent was on American authors.

OOOPS  :-[ (Of course, I could have inadvertantly ended the American author tangent and started a English author one?)
 
BTW, I love Dickens.  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on May 22, 2008, 06:25:19 PM
I just finished Why Christianity Must Change or Die by Bp. Spong. I found the book to be largely unconvincing, though that might have come partially from an unfamiliarity with the concept of God that he was trying to argue for. I think if I had read more of authors such as Paul Tillich, I would have better understood exactly where Bp. Spong was going in this book. Even then, though, there seemed to be a streak of pessimism in the book that I found off-putting. For example, Bp. Spong says that Christians use terms like "divine" and "almighty" as an attempt to flatter God and get something out of it (p. 139). Surely most Christians use such terms because they believe it proper to reverence God. I also just started another book by Bp. Spong, Resuing the Bible from Fundamentalism, though it's too early to form any opinions about this one. As to why 2 books by this particular author: I had for years heard bad things about him, and had perhaps even myself said a bad thing or two about him, so I figured I owed him a fair hearing.

I also recently started The Existence of God by John Hick. This is a book I first read 8 years ago, when I was in a similar spiritual place. I recalled it helping me then, so I figured I'd give it another shot. Basically the book gives the arguments for the existence of God, and then allows different authors to offer commentary and opposing views. Hick believes that you cannot argue someone into believing in God through these proofs (which I would agree with, eventually there must be a place for faith), but still considers it an important topic.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: stanley123 on May 22, 2008, 06:38:32 PM
I also recently started The Existence of God by John Hick.
There is a recent book on this subject which is not too bad:There Is a God: How the World's Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind by Antony Flew and Roy Abraham Varghese

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on May 22, 2008, 06:51:20 PM
Stanley

Quote
There is a recent book on this subject which is not too bad:There Is a God: How the World's Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind by Antony Flew and Roy Abraham Varghese

Yeah, I have that one on the Christmas list, though it'll probably get bought sometime this summer. I look forward to hearing what the man has to say.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on May 22, 2008, 09:22:34 PM
I'm reading The Thought War a study of Japanese Propaganda in the "Fifteen Years War/WWII" era, Empire of Ivory the fourth "Temeraire" book by Naomi Novik, Japanese Tales translated by Royall Tyler, Hogfather by Terry Pratchett.

I'm also gearing up to read the first three chapters of my text book for the Summer Session of "ENG 102" which used to be, when I was young, "Freshman Comp" but now they don't call it that.  Since I was first in college the rules have changed and everyone must take it. No testing out, no CLEPing out. I'd never had it so I'm stuck. So I decided to take it in the somewhat compressed form of a 2 month or so Summer class rather then in a regular term.  Ah well, it's more credits and another step to a degree.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on May 22, 2008, 11:54:26 PM
I'm thinking of reading The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini.  Currently, I'm reading A Hole in the Heart of the World by Jonathan Kaufman.  It's about 'the Jewish experience in Eastern Europe after WWII'.  Also, a great reference book from my library is The Blackwell Dictionary of Eastern Christianity.  Amazing book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: BrotherAidan on May 25, 2008, 12:01:27 AM
Auralia's Colors (a new Christian fantasy story)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 25, 2008, 01:40:59 AM
The Ragamuffin Gospel - Brennan Manning
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Bono Vox on May 25, 2008, 02:41:47 AM
Social Problems: Identifying and understanding problems in society 5th edition.

Yeah, its another boring school book for another sociology class.  :P
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on May 25, 2008, 06:40:54 AM
Just finished Manuel II Palaeologus 1391-1425: A Study in Late Byzantine Statesmanship  John W. Barker. Rutgers Byzantine Series; Rutgers University Press, 1969

Next up (I'd started before this):
Arab Historians of the Crusades - Francesco Gabrieli
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on May 25, 2008, 10:35:17 AM
I'm re-reading Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. I was interrupted last year by the beginning of school, and between the classes I teach and the ones I'm taking, during the school year I never get a good enough window for fiction or even any books unrelated to school. So I welcome summer fiction season and all the joy it will bring.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 25, 2008, 06:43:04 PM
"Roksolana" by a Ukrainian writer, Pavlo Zahrebel'nyj. (In Ukrainian.) It's a very well-written historical novel about a young woman from Podillya (southwestern Ukraine - then part of the Polish Kingdom), who was captured and sold into slavery by Crimean Tatars, but in 1524 became the beloved wife of the Ottoman sultan Suleyman the Magnificent. Her real name was Anastasia Lisovs'ka. The Turks called her Hurrem ("the merry one") or Hasseki. She was not a picture-perfect beauty - rather, a tomboy: very short, thin, with red hair, green eyes and a funny shaped "pig nose." However, she was enormously intelligent, strong-willed, humorous, and a great diplomat. Between 1524 and 1528 she actually prevented several wars between the Ottoman Empire and the Polish kingdom, acting through her trusted Yenicheri commander Hassan Agasi-Efendi and a Polish ambassador Jan of Trenchyn. Very intriguing story line, and a lot of most intense and educational material about the 16-th century Europe.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on May 27, 2008, 04:51:16 PM
Just started two new books recently: Adam, Eve, and the Serpent by Elaine Pagels, and The Debate About the Bible: Inerrancy Versus Infallibility by Stephen T. Davis. I read the second book years ago, when I was still a Protestant. Basically Mr. Davis argues that the Bible is infallible but not inerrant (ie. that there are errors and contradictions here and there in the Bible, but that these errors don't compromise the truthfulness of the Bible when it comes to matters of faith and practice).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Anastasios on May 27, 2008, 05:09:42 PM

Next up (I'd started before this):
Arab Historians of the Crusades - Francesco Gabrieli

You may like Byzantium Viewed by the Arabs
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on May 27, 2008, 05:17:32 PM
I'm a little more than halfway through Jesus of Nazareth by Pope Benedict and am about to start Frankenstein: a cultural history by Susan Tyler Hitchcock (http://www.wwnorton.com/catalog/fall07/006144.htm).  My wife found it very dry but I like that sort of writing.

I must say that I find Pope Benedict's writing style, even in translation, to be very engaging.  I'm learning alot from this book and look forward to reading more of his works in the future.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. George on May 27, 2008, 05:27:45 PM
Been slowly working on A Noble Task: Entry into the Clergy in the First Five Centuries
by Lewis J. Patsavos (Translated by Norman Russell)

My Canon Law professor's doctoral dissertation for the University of Athens (hence why it needed to be translated).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Andrew21091 on May 27, 2008, 06:37:24 PM
I have just started read Blessed John the Wonderworker.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on May 30, 2008, 09:35:18 AM
For a bit of lighter reading Installing Linux on a Dead Badger by Lucy Snyder  geek humour with a bit of the macabre (employing zombies as tech support for example)

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on May 30, 2008, 10:24:23 AM
geek humour with a bit of the macabre (employing zombies as tech support for example)

That's not real?    :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on May 30, 2008, 12:41:01 PM
For a bit of lighter reading Installing Linux on a Dead Badger by Lucy Snyder  geek humour with a bit of the macabre (employing zombies as tech support for example)

Ebor

LoL, I have never heard of this book before.  I am going to have to find a copy.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on June 03, 2008, 07:01:57 PM
Started two new books recently. One is Jesus: A Life by A.N. Wilson. It's hardly orthodox, but it is at least an engaging read (which sort of reminds me of his biography on Paul). The second book is Scripture and Tradition by Archbp. Chrysostomos and Bp. Auxentios. Of the Orthodox books on this subject that I've read, I remember this one being the most helpful, so I figured I'd buy it and read it again. Luckily I snatched it up for $5, as the only other copy now on Amazon is $153.97!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: MaryCecilia on June 04, 2008, 02:26:54 AM
Currently i'm finishing up reading Star Trek TNG Crossover by Michael Jan Friedman. It's alright as far as Star Trek books go. Late in May i read "7th Heaven" by James Patterson which i thought was pretty good... i have been enjoying reading murder mysteries and sci fi/star trek books lately.

mary
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on June 04, 2008, 03:13:40 AM
Still into light reading at the moment. Just finished "Ragamuffin Gospel" and thought it a little on the unbalanced side, but a pleasant read all the same. And I've just about finished three of Paul Doherty's books about political intrigue and murder in Ancient Rome set just after St Constantine has become emperor of the west.

Murder Imperial 
The Song of the Gladiator 
The Queen of the Night 

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on June 04, 2008, 03:42:37 AM
Just finished "Ragamuffin Gospel"

You might like his Abba's Child.  I say might because it's been 4 years since I've read it so I don't remember much about it.  I seem to recall that I did enjoy it at the time though.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on June 04, 2008, 03:51:43 AM
Thanks, Gabriel. I'll have a look at that. I did like the Ragamuffin, but it seemed just a little unbalanced; though I understood his need to get the point across that God is unconditional in His love and we should be, too. It was a nice read.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on June 09, 2008, 05:05:05 PM
I'm finally starting to get some Orthodox books to read! ;D I've been reading The Orthodox Way by Met. Kallistos over the past few days (also reread this critique (http://www.orthodoxinfo.com/phronema/review_tow.aspx) of it), and just today I got The Sayings of the Desert Fathers in the mail.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on June 09, 2008, 05:24:19 PM
My favorite Steinbeck work is Cannery Row.  His characters are described so richly and descriptively that it's easy to 'see' them.  He understands the human condition very well and I think most people can identify with at least parts of his characters or at least his narrative.   

Hear, hear! And also "Sweet Thursday"!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Carpatho Russian on June 09, 2008, 07:05:29 PM
I just finished Vladimir Lossky's "Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church" (in Russian, http://www.wco.ru/biblio/books/lossk1/Main.htm).
I started reading Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church (in English) this weekend.
I'm about halfway through William Rosen's Justinian's Flea.  And for fun, I'm reading Noah Charney's The Art Thief.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: AMM on June 09, 2008, 10:59:43 PM
This month's bon appetit.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on June 09, 2008, 11:49:09 PM
Hear, hear! And also "Sweet Thursday"!
Can you believe that I've never read Sweet Thursday?  And here I call myself a Steinbeck fan!  Really, though, I've read a great many of his fictional work and he's honestly, thus far, my favorite American author.  As for foreign authors, well, I'm no xenophobe, but I don't know whom to begin with.  I've read The Brothers K and liked it, but I'm having a rough time with Crime and Punishment.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on June 10, 2008, 12:58:40 AM
Quote
I've read The Brothers K and liked it, but I'm having a rough time with Crime and Punishment.

For me it was the opposite... to each his own, I suppose :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on June 10, 2008, 12:24:03 PM
Can you believe that I've never read Sweet Thursday?  And here I call myself a Steinbeck fan!  Really, though, I've read a great many of his fictional work and he's honestly, thus far, my favorite American author.  As for foreign authors, well, I'm no xenophobe, but I don't know whom to begin with.  I've read The Brothers K and liked it, but I'm having a rough time with Crime and Punishment.

"Sweet Thursday" is a sequel to "Cannery Row." Very much the same style, and many heroes are the same. Incredible sense of humor, humility, lightness...

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: _Seraphim_ on June 12, 2008, 05:38:58 PM
Quote
Let us begin to really belong to the Orthodox Church of Christ.  Our ‘membership’ is not enough.  Something must move within us that makes us different from the world around us… even if that world calls itself ‘Christian’ or even ‘Orthodox.’  Let us keep and nourish those qualities of the true Orthodox worldview – a living, normal attitude; loving and forgiving; not self-centered; preserving our innocence and un-worldliness; even with a full and humble awareness of our own sinfulness and the power of the worldly temptations which surround us.  If we truly live this Orthodox worldview our faith will survive the shocks ahead of us and be a source of inspiration and salvation for those who will still be seeking Christ even amidst the shipwreck of humanity which has already begun today.

-Seraphim Rose, Living the Orthodox Worldview, August 8, 1982
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Veniamin on June 20, 2008, 08:25:09 PM
I just wrapped up Kushiel's Scion, by Jacqueline Carey, and have moved on to its sequel, Kushiel's Justice.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on June 20, 2008, 09:15:41 PM
The Well-Crafted Argument  the text book for the ENG102 class that I *have* to take as they've changed the rules since I was young and now everyone has to have a class in what we used to call "Freshman Comp."  The present chapter is on "Toulmin Analysis" of arguments.

also today I read some Usagi Yojimbo   ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on June 27, 2008, 09:20:45 AM
After watching Disney murder Prince Caspian last weekend, I started reading the Chronicles of Narnia again.  Starting with The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, of course.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on June 27, 2008, 11:44:23 AM
I never believed anyone could turn Lewis' masterpiece of defeating prejudice and living the Christian life even when God seems far away into such a bloodbath. That movie is not for children at all. Fortunately, the books are still as fantastic as ever.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on June 27, 2008, 11:49:58 AM
I never believed anyone could turn Lewis' masterpiece of defeating prejudice and living the Christian life even when God seems far away into such a bloodbath. That movie is not for children at all. Fortunately, the books are still as fantastic as ever.

Agreed, it was all battle scenes and none of the actual storyline.  But, that's Disney and Hollywood for you.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on June 27, 2008, 11:53:27 AM
They did the first one better, but I guess redemption and defeat of evil are more Hollywood-friendly themes than tolerance and perseverance.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on June 27, 2008, 11:57:06 AM
Currently The Isaac Play by Margaret Frazer (who also wrote the Dame Frivisse series), the first in a (relatively) new series by her about a group of English play performers in the mid-15th century.  I like the way she writes but there's WAY too much backstory going on.  The main crisis (a murder, natch) doesn't occur until almost 1/3 of the way through the book.  I'll give the next one in the series a try but if it's the same, I'll be leaving this one behind.

Anne Rice's Christ the Lord is up next.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Veniamin on June 27, 2008, 12:02:15 PM
I just wrapped up Kushiel's Scion, by Jacqueline Carey, and have moved on to its sequel, Kushiel's Justice.

Finished Kushiel's Justice a few days ago and have started on the last book, Kushiel's Mercy.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on June 27, 2008, 03:45:41 PM
Finishing up reading The New Testament Documents: Are They Reliable? by F.F. Bruce, which wasn't as good as I figured it'd be. Also just started reading An Overview of Orthodox Canon Law (sorry Ozgeorge, that's the title :) ), by Prof. Dr. Panteleimon Rodopoulos.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on June 27, 2008, 04:56:00 PM
I have just read St. John Chrysostom's "Homilies on Genesis" (in a Russian translation). It took me quite a while to get used to St. John style; at first, I was irritated because it seemed to me that he is too verbose and not really focused, that his thought jumps from subject to subject. But then, eventually, I did get used to his peculiar style. After all, we are talking about someone who lived in the late 4th century A.D. (when they definitely had different idea about what's good analytical writing), and someone who was famous for being a "rhetor," a public speaker-propagandist rather than a scholar-logocian. I think I benefited a lot from reading this book. Many interesting, deep thoughts, especially about the nature of God's so-called "punishments" (which are always, as St. John emphasizes, "therapeutic" rather than vindictive). Also, I was pretty surprised that there is almost no Platonism in this work. Chrysostom does not, for example, speak about "coats of skins" as the indication that the pre-lapsarian human body was "ethereal, light," but became "stout" after the Fall. In his mind, it seems, the consequence of the Fall was not a physical, but a psychological change in the humans, the emergence of certain wild, un-quenchable desires.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on July 01, 2008, 06:45:38 PM
I'm into Gore Vidal's Julian.  It is very anti-Christian (not to mention anti-Orthodox), but it is extremely well written and I'm enjoying every page of it.  I'm also counterbalancing it with G.W. Bowersock's Julian which is an actual historical biography.  I recommend both.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Andrew21091 on July 05, 2008, 07:09:50 PM
I'm currently reading Elder Zosima, Hesychast of Siberia. Its very good; almost done with it. I think next on the list is either Talks with Father Paisios or Heavenly Realm: Lay Sermons of Fr. Seraphim Rose.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aquaticus on July 05, 2008, 11:11:40 PM
Right now I'm reading "The Shape of the Liturgy" by Gregory Dix. It is an excellent book covering the development of Christian liturgical worship from penacost to the middle ages. It is a 750 page tome in small print so it should hold me a while.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Andrew21091 on July 15, 2008, 05:23:59 PM
I've finished both Talks With Father Paisios and Elder Hadji-Georgis. I loved both of the books and strongly recommend them both. :) I'm reading Elder Joseph the Hesychast: Struggles, Experiences, Teachings which I'm about half way through it is very good. I've been looking at any books about monasticism especially stuff on Elder Paisios or Elder Joseph the Hesychast and other Athonite Fathers, I'm soon going to get Monastic Wisdom: The Letters of Elder Joseph the Hesychast along with Athonite Fathers and Athonite Matters by Elder Paisios.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on August 28, 2008, 09:21:23 PM
Currently reading "The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time" by Mark Haddon.
It's listed as "teenage fiction", but I'm finding it quite brilliant. It's a "murder mystery" written from the perspective of 15 year old "Christopher" who has Asperger Syndrome (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome). His concrete but logical thinking and inability to understand social cues and other's non-verbal communication both help and hinder his investigation of the "murder" of his neighbour's dog- and much more!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on August 28, 2008, 10:10:30 PM
^ Interesting. I had a student with Asperger's a couple of years ago. She was a sweet kid when she had a good day, but she was so easily frustrated that I had to create a deal with her that she could sit in the hall by herself when she felt she had to be alone. This agreement helped to calm her, but she still missed out on a lot of instruction.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SolEX01 on August 28, 2008, 10:42:58 PM
At the bookstore the other day, I was thumbing through Why People Die by Suicide by Thomas Joiner (http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog/JOIWHY.html).  Dr. Joiner lost his father to suicide in 1990 and the book develops a models as to why people commit suicide, one of which is the increased tolerance for pain while negating the self-preservation instinct.

I'm also waiting for the 2nd Edition of Reading People: How to Understand People and Predict Their Behavior- -Anytime, Anyplace (http://www.amazon.com/Reading-People-Understand-Behavior-Anytime/dp/0345425871) by  Jo-Ellan Dimitrius & Mark C. Mazzarella.  I read the 1st Edition until I lost the book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on August 29, 2008, 10:03:01 AM
"New Lies for Old" and "The Perestroika Deception" by Anatoliy Golitsyn. Here's a link to full text in English (PDF file):

http://www.conspiracyresearch.org/forums/index.php?s=f5bd0e72b4cee04eb3a2afe3f5e1190b&act=attach&type=post&id=452

The books are, essentially, a compillation of memoranda sent to the CIA and other Western agencies by a former KGB officer in the years 1961-1989. Overall, might seem a bit "alarmist" or even "conspirationist," but a very interesting read. Quite a thought-provoking work.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Myrrh23 on August 29, 2008, 06:17:36 PM
I'm re-reading Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore, and reading for the first time LOAMHEDGE by Brian Jacques. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on August 29, 2008, 08:04:10 PM
"Dark Lord of Derkholm", by Diana Wynne Jones.

"Emotional Vampires", by Albert J. Bernstein, Ph.D.

"Encountering the Mystery", by His All Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew.

The "Harry Potter" series for the umpteenth time; in preparation for the release of film #6; which, I hear, has been delayed.  >:(
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Myrrh23 on August 29, 2008, 09:41:45 PM
The "Harry Potter" series for the umpteenth time; in preparation for the release of film #6; which, I hear, has been delayed.  >:(

LOL, I haven't even read the first book.... :-X
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on August 29, 2008, 10:46:49 PM
LOL, I haven't even read the first book.... :-X

Well, that's very naughty of you!!!!  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Myrrh23 on August 29, 2008, 10:57:34 PM
Well, that's very naughty of you!!!!  ;D

(bows repeatedly before Riddikulus) I'm not worthy! I'm not worthy! :D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on August 29, 2008, 11:06:40 PM
(bows repeatedly before Riddikulus) I'm not worthy! I'm not worthy! :D

Glad to see that you realise it!!  :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Myrrh23 on August 29, 2008, 11:08:02 PM
Glad to see that you realise it!!  :laugh:

of course!....(sneaks glances at a Harry Potter movie on her phone) :P
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on August 29, 2008, 11:09:26 PM
of course!....(sneaks glances at a Harry Potter movie on her phone) :P

Oh no!!  :o You have to read the books first - no cheating!!!!   :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Myrrh23 on August 29, 2008, 11:16:30 PM
Would it be cheating if I got Star Trek's Data to read the book for me at his accelerated pace, and...skim it down for me? ;D
Jeez..what did my dad put in this lamb tonight? :P
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on August 29, 2008, 11:22:44 PM
Jeez..what did my dad put in this lamb tonight? :P

I don't know, but if you find out let us in on the secret!!  ;D Pray for me; I'm off out to take grandaughter for a driving lesson. Not good for the blood pressure!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on August 30, 2008, 08:33:13 PM
Currently reading "The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time" by Mark Haddon.
It's listed as "teenage fiction", but I'm finding it quite brilliant. It's a "murder mystery" written from the perspective of 15 year old "Christopher" who has Asperger Syndrome (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome). His concrete but logical thinking and inability to understand social cues and other's non-verbal communication both help and hinder his investigation of the "murder" of his neighbour's dog- and much more!

I read that book a few years ago and loved it.  I thought he was autistic?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: DanM on August 30, 2008, 09:33:18 PM
The present chapter is on "Toulmin Analysis" of arguments.

Treat yourself to Toulmin's book _The Uses of Argument_.  I have just started it; it's a gem. 
On the same Olympian peak find Sommer and Engelbretsen's _An invitation to formal reasoning:  The logic of terms_. 
DanM
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on August 30, 2008, 09:35:27 PM
I read that book a few years ago and loved it.  I thought he was autistic?

Asperger Syndrome is a form of autism, I believe.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Veniamin on August 30, 2008, 09:52:11 PM
I'm busy with We Were Soldiers Once, and Young and On War.  Yay for the Chief of Staff's recommended reading list. ::)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on August 31, 2008, 07:20:01 AM
I'm busy with We Were Soldiers Once, and Young and On War.  Yay for the Chief of Staff's recommended reading list. ::)
I understand. I've got Communicating in Groups and Ethical Communication for the new classes I'm teaching, and Curriculum Planning and Handbook of Differentiated Instruction Using Multiple Intelligences: With Lesson Plans! for my master's class. Yea.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on August 31, 2008, 06:08:03 PM
Knitting stitch dictionaries.  I have the urge to make things but not the attention span.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on September 04, 2008, 05:05:20 PM
Started Tolstoi's The Kingdom of God is Within You this morning. Found on page 1 why the Church condemned it and him...might not go further, too many books, so little time...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on September 04, 2008, 05:27:22 PM
Started Tolstoi's The Kingdom of God is Within You this morning. Found on page 1 why the Church condemned it and him...might not go further, too many books, so little time...

I am with you on this.:) He is my favorite writer, my absolute number one - but ONLY as far as his "non-religious" writings go. I love his "War and Peace," "Anna Karenina," "Resurrection" (somewhat less), his "Kreutzer's Sonate," "Sevastopol Tales," "Kossaks," many of his short stories. But whenever he begins to philosophize and to write his own Gospels, I am out. :(
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PeterTheAleut on September 04, 2008, 05:30:17 PM
About to start Gaston Leroux's The Phantom of the Opera, the novel on which Andrew Lloyd Webber based his world famous stage musical of the same name
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on September 04, 2008, 06:30:21 PM
Maria Matios, "The Nation." (In Ukrainian: Марія Матіос, "Нація.") Hard to define the genre: it's not a novel and not a collection of stories, but something "in between." A large amalgam of fiction, memoire, poetry, again fiction, and again memoire, written over a long period of time (between 1994 and 2006), focusing on a huge extended family and its friends and neighbors living in several villages in the Carpathian mountains. The story goes back to the times when it was still Austro-Hungarian Empire, and ends in the year 1990. The author's special attention is on inter-ethnic relations, particularly Ukrainian-Romanian and Ukrainian-Jewish, and on the participation of Carpathian Ukrainians (especially women and young girls) in the heroic UPA guerilla resistance to Soviets in 1944-55.

Amazing author, amazing language (very beautiful Ukrainian with lots of interesting Bukovina dialectisms), amazing style - sometimes very Marquezian, where the border between real and surreal is somewhat murky.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on September 04, 2008, 07:12:08 PM
Yevgeny Zamyatin's We.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SouthSerb99 on September 05, 2008, 12:57:27 PM
Just finished "Knife" by Vuk Draskovic.  Book was banned by the communists in 1982 when it was written.  Truly a brilliant book.  One of the best I've read. 

Book Description

"Knife," by Vuk Draskovic, created a furor when it was published in 1982, long before the beginning of the Balkan Wars of Succession. The novel was condemned by the Communist Part and subsequently banned. "Knife" is the first of his novels to appear in English.

Alija Osmanovic, the protagonist of "Knife," was orphaned during WWII as an infant. He was raised as a Bosnian Muslim and came to believe that Serbs killed his family. When, as a young medical student, he goes in search of the identity of his murdered birth parents, a sense of thwarted justice motivates him, and expresses itself as a burning passion for revenge. Alija seeks out Sikter Effendi, an eccentric and reclusive Muslim cleric, to help him interpret the clues pointing to his identity. Through his mentorship, Alija discovers the truth: that his heritage is Serbian; that he was born not far away but in a neighboring village; and that his adoptive family was guilty of murdering his birth-family. A crisis of identity ensues. Each possible course of action open to him is bad. How is he to go on?

Alija's story is counterpointed by Milan Vilenjak's. He has been training all his life to exact revenge from Atif Tanovic, an Ustashi who single-handedly murdered Milan's entire family. But once Milan has the opportunity to end his enemy's life, he recoils, having discovered that Atif is a human being, a man who exists apart from his monsterous acts, a man who is troubled by his bad conscience. Tanovic, an avowed war criminal, is a repulsive villain who is to be prosecuted and punished, but Draskovic persuades us to sympathize with him. Who cannot admire the profound transformation that occurs when Atif argues against war and the slaughter of innocents? He embodies Draskovic's underlying theme: each act of revenge is a suicide.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Carpatho Russian on September 05, 2008, 05:21:05 PM
For those of you who like detective fiction, I recommend Boris Akunin's Sister Pelagia and the White Bull Dog and Sister Pelagia and the Black Monk.  The sleuth in these two novels is a Russian Orthodox nun, Sister Pelagia and the stoies take place during the late 1800's in Russia.  Boris Akunin is a Russian (Georgian) author whose previous novels revolve around a Russian detective Erast Fandorin.  All of Akunin's novels are a good read if you like detective fiction.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on September 05, 2008, 07:23:14 PM
Knitting stitch dictionaries.
Why are you knitting stitch dictionaries? Has your word processor died? Seems to me it would be easier to write them by hand.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on September 05, 2008, 08:10:22 PM
Why are you knitting stitch dictionaries? Has your word processor died? Seems to me it would be easier to write them by hand.
Congratulations, George. You are now qualified to be a teacher. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on September 06, 2008, 06:41:55 PM
Knitting stitch dictionaries.
Why are you knitting stitch dictionaries? Has your word processor died? Seems to me it would be easier to write them by hand.

LOL... I should learn by now to be clearer.   :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on September 06, 2008, 06:58:14 PM
LOL... I should learn by now to be clearer.   :laugh:

 :D I can only imagine the joys of being married to a teacher!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on September 06, 2008, 08:20:03 PM
Ozgeorge, you smart-donkey.  LOL
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tallitot on September 07, 2008, 02:28:50 AM
A Crime So Monstrous: Face-to-Face with Modern-Day Slavery
by E. Benjamin Skinner
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: stanley123 on September 07, 2008, 08:23:10 PM
A Crime So Monstrous: Face-to-Face with Modern-Day Slavery
by E. Benjamin Skinner
thanks for the tip on this book. It looks like it covers a topic that people should know more about.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tallitot on September 07, 2008, 08:43:58 PM
He works with Kevin Bales, the author of "Disposable People"
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SouthSerb99 on September 11, 2008, 09:49:24 AM
Death and the Dervish - Mesa Selimovic
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Acolyte on September 11, 2008, 03:21:15 PM
Since it appears to be a ritual on this forum to post in this thread, I will do so before I pursue other things.

The Kingdom of God is Within You - Leo Tolstoy

The Essential Chomsky - Noam Chomsky

Objectivism, The Philosophy of Ayn Rand - Leonard Peikoff


Since I'm bored focusing on one book at a time, I like to have a good list of books during a particular time.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on September 11, 2008, 07:47:12 PM
I admit it, I'm reading the Left Behind series, now on Tribulation Force.  My reason: to find out if it's really as bad as people say it is, or if they're just making unfair attacks.  I knew the theology was bad, but then I started hearing that it said other Christian faiths besides the evangelicals were getting "left behind."  Then there was that "Left Behind: Eternal Forces" game.  I couldn't properly evaluate the criticisms here: http://www.talk2action.org/section/religious_war (http://www.talk2action.org/section/religious_war) without knowing what's really in the books.

What I've discovered so far: 1) If you don't say the right prayer, carry out the salvation "transaction," you get left behind.  2) If you don't believe the right doctrines, you get left behind.  The Pope only got raptured because he was a heretic trying to introduce Luther's doctrines.  3) If you don't believe in the premillennial dispensationalist interpretation of Revelations, you get left behind.

Of course, it's so badly written that--after reading http://slacktivist.typepad.com/slacktivist/left_behind/index.html (http://slacktivist.typepad.com/slacktivist/left_behind/index.html) and watching some old episodes of Mystery Science Theater: 3000--I can't help cracking jokes as I read.



Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SiviSokol on September 11, 2008, 09:41:51 PM
Death and the Dervish - Mesa Selimovic
That's a good one!  It's been a while since I've read it, though.  A friend (and former professor of mine) did an English translation of it.

I'm trying to plow through Boswell's Life of Johnson but haven't gotten very far.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Veniamin on September 11, 2008, 10:00:32 PM
Objectivism, The Philosophy of Ayn Rand - Leonard Peikoff

I've not read that one, but I did find Introduction to Objectivist Epistemology rather interesting.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SouthSerb99 on September 12, 2008, 08:35:40 AM
Death and the Dervish - Mesa Selimovic
That's a good one!  It's been a while since I've read it, though.  A friend (and former professor of mine) did an English translation of it.

I'm trying to plow through Boswell's Life of Johnson but haven't gotten very far.

I've got some Ivo Andric lined up right behind Selimovic (having just finished off Draskovic's Knife).

Although... I've got to tell you, I'm NOT a huge fan of Selimovic's writing style.  I find him slightly pedantic (or at least he is in this book).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on September 12, 2008, 09:23:12 AM
I admit it, I'm reading the Left Behind series, now on Tribulation Force.  My reason: to find out if it's really as bad as people say it is, or if they're just making unfair attacks.  I knew the theology was bad, but then I started hearing that it said other Christian faiths besides the evangelicals were getting "left behind."  Then there was that "Left Behind: Eternal Forces" game.  I couldn't properly evaluate the criticisms here: http://www.talk2action.org/section/religious_war (http://www.talk2action.org/section/religious_war) without knowing what's really in the books.

What I've discovered so far: 1) If you don't say the right prayer, carry out the salvation "transaction," you get left behind.  2) If you don't believe the right doctrines, you get left behind.  The Pope only got raptured because he was a heretic trying to introduce Luther's doctrines.  3) If you don't believe in the premillennial dispensationalist interpretation of Revelations, you get left behind.

Of course, it's so badly written that--after reading http://slacktivist.typepad.com/slacktivist/left_behind/index.html (http://slacktivist.typepad.com/slacktivist/left_behind/index.html) and watching some old episodes of Mystery Science Theater: 3000--I can't help cracking jokes as I read.


That's my major gripe with the series:  It's just so badly written that I can't take any of the doctrine seriously anyway.  The theology and eschatology is way off, but I couldn't even get beyond the corniness to really think about that.  I started reading the series when I was still Baptist and I admit I really liked it at first because I was interested in eschatology but once I started gravitating toward Orthodoxy I lost interest in it.  I finished out the series just to say I had, but I laughed through the entire last two books.  I also couldn't get over the irony that "God's chosen ones" were toting automatic weapons and shooting up the Antichrist's offices.  Some godly force.   ::)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: jlerms on September 12, 2008, 10:59:19 AM
St. Silouan the Athonite by Archimandrite Sophrony.  So far it is excellent and edifying!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Quinault on September 12, 2008, 03:43:18 PM
Pride and Prejudice (I have the Austen anthology)
The Quotidian Mysteries: Laundry, Liturgy and Women's work (short lecture by Kathleen Norris in print form)
Love Never Ends: Growing together in Faith and Marriage (my husband and I are reading concurrently while he is in Colorado)
Cranford Chronicles

With the above books, as well as all the homeschooling books I am going thru, it will likely be quite awhile before I finish them all.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SiviSokol on September 12, 2008, 04:13:32 PM

I've got some Ivo Andric lined up right behind Selimovic (having just finished off Draskovic's Knife).

Although... I've got to tell you, I'm NOT a huge fan of Selimovic's writing style.  I find him slightly pedantic (or at least he is in this book).

I think that was the point, as a psychological/moral study of Nuruddin.  What of Andric's will you be reading?  I really enjoyed Na Drini Cuprija, but I think I liked Travnicka Hronika better.  It's been more than 10 years since I've read either, though...maybe now I'd have a different opinion.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: SouthSerb99 on September 12, 2008, 06:44:57 PM
I think that was the point, as a psychological/moral study of Nuruddin.  What of Andric's will you be reading?  I really enjoyed Na Drini Cuprija, but I think I liked Travnicka Hronika better.  It's been more than 10 years since I've read either, though...maybe now I'd have a different opinion.

I have both (except I have the English translations - The Bridge on the Drina & The Days of Consuls), but was going to read Drina first.

As for Nuruddin and Selimovic's examination of him, I get it but I find myself not caring enough at times.  It's kind of like a very mild case of Dobrica Cosic (who I find intolerable to read).  I guess I like a bit more of a superficial read than Selimovic offers. lol
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on September 12, 2008, 08:09:13 PM
That's my major gripe with the series:  It's just so badly written that I can't take any of the doctrine seriously anyway.  The theology and eschatology is way off, but I couldn't even get beyond the corniness to really think about that.  I started reading the series when I was still Baptist and I admit I really liked it at first because I was interested in eschatology but once I started gravitating toward Orthodoxy I lost interest in it.  I finished out the series just to say I had, but I laughed through the entire last two books.  I also couldn't get over the irony that "God's chosen ones" were toting automatic weapons and shooting up the Antichrist's offices.  Some godly force.   ::)

Oooh, I can't wait to get to that part.   :D

.........

Quinault, I love Jane Austen!  I've been through all the books at least 3 times by now, and I've also read a couple of biographies.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GiC on September 13, 2008, 10:56:53 AM
I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell but Tucker Max, truly a god amongst men. My brother who never reads anything longer than a billboard recommended it to me, so I had to give it a go. Easily one of the best books I've ever read...I'm only about a third of the way through and it's already been a life-changing experience. A lot of the stories are available for free on his website, but the book's certainly worth the 10 bucks.

http://www.amazon.com/Hope-They-Serve-Beer-Hell/dp/0806527285/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1221317192&sr=8-1
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on September 16, 2008, 07:44:42 PM
The text book for my Comparative Govenments class

The Tenor Wore Tapshoes  third in a series of light murder mysteries where the main character is the Police Chief of a small town in western North Carolina, the organist and choir director at the local Episcopal Church and wannabe Raymond Chandler who writes really bad 'hard boiled detective' stores in which the protagonist is a "Liturgy Detective".  Some very funny bits for me and the other Anglicans I know who've read it.

A Walk in Kumamoto a memoir and study of the wife of Lafcadio Hearn and her life with him.

Just finished
The Hallowed Hunt by Lois McMaster Bujold alternate world fantasy set in an Europe late medieval/early Renaissance time frame that takes religion seriously as part of the people's lives and doesn't disrespect the idea of belief.  Not Christianity, but still well written and thoughtful.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on October 01, 2008, 07:35:16 PM
One Flew over the Onion Dome: American Orthodox Converts, Retreads & Reverts, by Fr. Joseph David Huneycutt
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: OrthodoxPilgrim on October 01, 2008, 08:45:03 PM
 - Grant Morrison's All Star Superman Vol. 1
 - Beyond Opinion: Living the Faith we Defend - Ravi Zacharias
 - I, Isaac take thee, Rebekkah: Moving from Romance to Lasting Love - Ravi Zacharias
 
...I read one chapter of a book one day and another chapter of another book, the next day.....and so on....  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Sophie on October 02, 2008, 04:18:56 AM
Just finished Absolution by Murder, by Peter Tremayne, a crime novel based on the actual Synod of Whitby. Before that, read The Space Between Us by Thrity Umrigar, a story about two Indian women of different social class.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on October 02, 2008, 10:26:00 AM
I've enjoyed a number of the Peter Tremayne "Sister Fidelma" mysteries.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on October 15, 2008, 06:13:50 PM
A non-fiction book, partially related to my teaching job: J. Langnan, "Ten Steps to Improving College Reading Skills." Townsend Press, 2003 (4th ed.), 612 pp., ISBN 1-59194-004-4.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Carpatho Russian on October 17, 2008, 07:37:08 PM
I am currently reading The Solzhenitsyn Reader edited by Edward Ericson and Daniel Mahoney, The Friend of the Bridegroom by Sergius Bulgakov, and Through a Glass, Darkly by Donna Leon.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on October 17, 2008, 07:44:39 PM

 - I, Isaac take thee, Rebekkah: Moving from Romance to Lasting Love - Ravi Zacharias
 
What'd you think of this book?  I really enjoyed it over the summer.  I particularly enjoyed the story with he and his brother talking about love.  He may be Protestant, but he makes a lot of great points on love and marriage; and his sincerety shows.

Edited for clarity
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on October 17, 2008, 09:49:12 PM
Just about to start Partakers of the Divine Nature: The History and Development of Deification in the Christian Traditions. It has essays on deification in the Bible, the early church, the reformers, and modern times.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: 88Devin12 on October 17, 2008, 10:04:43 PM
I am reading The Geography of Nowhere: The Rise and Decline of America's Manmade Landscape by James Howard Kunstler.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Geography_of_Nowhere
Quote
The Geography of Nowhere: The Rise and Decline of America's Man-Made Landscape is a book written in 1993 by James Howard Kunstler exploring the effects of urban sprawl, civil planning and the automobile on American society. The book is an attempt to discover how and why suburbia has ceased to be a credible human habitat, and what society might do about it. Kunstler proposes that by reviving civic art and civic life, we will rediscover public virtue and a new vision of the common good. 'The future will require us to build better places,' Kunstler says, 'or the future will belong to other people in other societies.'
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on October 18, 2008, 06:37:33 AM
Current reading:
The Loom of History, Herbert J. Muller.
This one takes some personal explanation. I remember my father slowly consuming this book back in 1965...and I do mean slowly consuming, taking weeks to digest this not overly heavy tome. In my youth I just assumed it was some elementary introduction to history in the Will Durant genre of popular digests and not a serious or deep exploration. In 1985, my father included his paperback copy in a box of books he UPS'ed me (as he does with his books a couple of times a year even now). It just sat on my shelf, gathering dust, my arrogant preconception still in force. Then a couple of weeks ago I picked it out for lunch reading at work - the book is literally falling apart now and I must read it in folio fashion with each page separated for the spine (to be repaired). What a dolt I was/am! This is a fabulous study of ancient Anatolia covering the Hittites, Trojans, Armenians, Cimmerians, Carians, Cappadocians, Lydians, Persians and nearly all the Ionian Greek colonies with special emphasis on the Greek colonies of western Asia Minor, along with my ancestral area of Trapezus/Trapezounta. Now I am the one slowly digesting this book.

The above will be followed by another book also with a "Dad story":

Francis Dvornik's The Slavs in European History and Civilization, Rutgers Byzantine Series.
The tome also sits on my father's book shelf even today. For the last 20 years I have implored him to read it so that I might then have it to continue my acquisition and reading of the entire series. He has yet to read his copy and so last week I went to biblio.com and found a new/unused copy for only $6.44 delivered; thus I now own my own copy and almost cannot wait to start it. I'm snow ready now.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on October 18, 2008, 07:55:16 AM
I am currently reading The Solzhenitsyn Reader edited by Edward Ericson and Daniel Mahoney, The Friend of the Bridegroom by Sergius Bulgakov, and Through a Glass, Darkly by Donna Leon.

Is this novel - "Through a Glass, Darkly" - the plot that Ingmar Bergman used for his early 1960's film with the same title?

It's probably my most favorite Bregman movie of all. I never read the book though.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Carpatho Russian on October 18, 2008, 10:45:22 AM
Heorhij,

No.  Donna Leon is the author of the Commissario Guido Brunetti Mysteries, which take place in Venice (of which this book is one).
If I remember correctly, the literal English translation of Ingmar Bergman's movie is "As in a Mirror" although it was translated into English as "Through a Glass Darkly".  And yes, I agree that this is my favorite Bergman film also.

CR
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on October 24, 2008, 01:05:06 AM
My wife really enjoyed this book, which I just started tonight:

Let Us Attend: A Journey Through the Orthodox Divine Liturgy, by Fr. Lawrence Farley
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on October 27, 2008, 07:37:47 PM
Current reading:
The Loom of History, Herbert J. Muller.
This one takes some personal explanation. I remember my father slowly consuming this book back in 1965...and I do mean slowly consuming, taking weeks to digest this not overly heavy tome. In my youth I just assumed it was some elementary introduction to history in the Will Durant genre of popular digests and not a serious or deep exploration. In 1985, my father included his paperback copy in a box of books he UPS'ed me (as he does with his books a couple of times a year even now). It just sat on my shelf, gathering dust, my arrogant preconception still in force. Then a couple of weeks ago I picked it out for lunch reading at work - the book is literally falling apart now and I must read it in folio fashion with each page separated for the spine (to be repaired). What a dolt I was/am! This is a fabulous study of ancient Anatolia covering the Hittites, Trojans, Armenians, Cimmerians, Carians, Cappadocians, Lydians, Persians and nearly all the Ionian Greek colonies with special emphasis on the Greek colonies of western Asia Minor, along with my ancestral area of Trapezus/Trapezounta. Now I am the one slowly digesting this book.
Thanks Aristokles. I will keep an eye out for it in second hand bookshops here (I'm limiting my online purchases until the Aussie dollar recovers a little!

Currently reading "The Emptied Soul: On the Nature of the Psychopath" (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0882143719/psychopathsorsoc) by Adolph Guggenbuhl-Craig.
I really don't recommend this as a light, bed-time read!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on November 02, 2008, 02:29:34 AM
Started The Way of a Pilgrim again tonight. I've read this twice before. The first time left a great impression on me. The second time I read it I was apathetic for some reason--must have been one of the dry times in my spiritual life. This time around it seems great again.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: DanM on November 02, 2008, 03:14:16 AM
De Bello Gallico, the Anabasis, The Right and Wrong of Compulsion by the State and Other Essays (Auberon Herbert), A Brief Greek Syntax (Louis Bevier).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on November 02, 2008, 04:26:54 AM
Xenophon, huh? OK (tipping hat). I'm starting Homer with Pharr.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: DanM on November 02, 2008, 11:56:29 AM
Xenophon, huh? OK (tipping hat). I'm starting Homer with Pharr.

I am a big fan of Pharr.  Another book I wish I had had when starting out is Seymours's Introduction to the language and verse of Homer (at Google Books), which is extremely detailed, useful and user-friendly.  I had been doing Homer for some time, but switched to Xenophon in a nostalgic fit.  I have just finished the first book with the greatest pleasure.  I will resist the urge to return to Homer until it becomes irresistible.  There simply is not time to read Homer, Xenophon, Caesar and Cicero every day.  Any time you want to compare notes on Homer, let me know.  DanM
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on November 03, 2008, 03:17:20 AM
Making God Real in the Orthodox Christian Home, by Anthony M. Coniaris. The title is pretty self-explanatory. This is sort of an older book for the subject (1977), but it's been an engaging enough read so far.

Liturgy and Tradition: Theological Reflections of Alexander Schmemann, ed. Thomas Fisch. To be honest I've never wild about Fr. Alexander, but my wife brought this book home from the Church library today, so I figured I might as well give it a shot. I also reread The Liturgical Theology of Father A. Schmemann (http://www.orthodoxinfo.com/phronema/pom_lit.aspx) by Father Michael Pomazansky tonight.

Toward an American Orthodox Church: The Establishment of an Autocephalous Orthodox Church, by Alexander Bogolepov. I've really enjoyed this book thus far. Lots of discussion of canons and ecclesiastical history in this one.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. George on November 03, 2008, 08:46:47 AM
All Cloudless Glory, a two-volume biography of George Washington.  Well written and quite engaging, I loved the story the first time I read them about 12-14 years ago.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on November 03, 2008, 01:15:55 PM
"The Well and the Shadows" - G.K. Chersteron. Any fans of Chesterton here?

"Mary and the Fathers of the Church"

"Summa Contra Gentiles" - Thomas Aquinas

Hopefully my next big read will be Aquinas' Commentary on Aristotle's Metaphysics.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: lubeltri on November 03, 2008, 01:42:26 PM
Chesterton fan here! Here in Massachusetts you can, in lieu of political party, put down your political views on your voter registration. Instead of Democratic or Republican, I planned to put down "Distributist."  :)

-

I'm currently reading A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin, Religious Vocation: An Unnecessary Mystery, The Lord of the Rings (my annual ritual, much delayed), and The Poems of the Pearl Manuscript.

After I polish off a couple of the above, I plan to begin Brideshead Revisited.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Veniamin on November 03, 2008, 01:42:27 PM
Atlas Shrugged.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on November 03, 2008, 07:24:06 PM
Chesterton fan here as well, though I've only read 4 of his books. I'd say in addition to that, though, that my favorite biography that I've read is about him as well (which contained various bits of his writings like his poetry).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on November 03, 2008, 07:32:20 PM
Still in a fantasy mood. Just read;

The Game, Castle in the Air, House of Many Ways, by Diana Wynne Jones.

Stranger in a Strange Land, by Robert Heinlein,

Interview with the Vampire, by Anne Rice,

Re-reading at present, Dracula, by Bram Stoker.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on November 05, 2008, 01:42:47 PM
The text for this semester's class which is PoliSci on Comparative Governments.  Last week was on the Russian governmental structure. This week is Hungary.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on November 05, 2008, 01:50:34 PM
The Annotated H.P. Lovecraft.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on November 05, 2008, 02:54:16 PM
Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on November 06, 2008, 01:19:43 AM
I've enjoyed some of Chesterton's more erm peculiar fiction such as The Man Who Was Thursday and The Napoleon of Notting Hill and short stories like the "Father Brown" ones, The Paradoxes of Mr. Pond and The Club of Queer Trades among others.  Then there is some of his poetry.

I read Brideshead Revisited for the first time recently.  I don't see how it is such a superior work as some say that it is, though.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on November 11, 2008, 05:02:55 AM
All three books borrowed from the parish library...

A Commentary on the Divine Liturgy, by St. Nicholas Cabasilas. My second time reading this one, and I'm glad I reread it. This has 53 "chapters" in it, and would be a good one to read once a week and reflect on on Sundays. There are some interesting liturgical issues in it as well, such as St. Nicholas mentioning how they kneel on Sunday, how they take the eucharist in their hands, etc. Overall a very good little book to read about the liturgy, and theology generally.

The Philokalia: Volume One, ed. by Palmer, Sherrard, Met. Kallistos. Also my 2nd time reading this one. I guess it needs no introduction. I was reading Way of a Pilgrim and he kept mentioning the book, so I had to get it again. My favorite work in it is probably On Those Who Think That They Are Made Righteous By Works by St. Mark the Ascetic.

Saint Gregory of Nazianzus: An Intellectual Biography, by Fr. John McGuckin. Again, maintaining the theme, this is the 2nd time I'm reading this book. This was one of my favorite books after my first read through, so I expect that I'll enjoy it this time around as well. He does get a bit too much into the psychoanalysis for my taste, but overall I find the book to be very enjoyable and engaging. Then again, I love Gregory the Theologian, so that's maybe to be expected.

A couple lengthy/complex books this time, that should do me for at least a couple weeks. Let's hope, anyway!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on November 11, 2008, 04:15:43 PM
Chesterton fan here! Here in Massachusetts you can, in lieu of political party, put down your political views on your voter registration. Instead of Democratic or Republican, I planned to put down "Distributist."  :)

 The Lord of the Rings (my annual ritual, much delayed),

After I polish off a couple of the above, I plan to begin Brideshead Revisited.
I want to be a distributist as well!!! LOL.
As for The Lord of the Rings, It is my annual ritual along with the bible. LOL
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Andrew21091 on November 11, 2008, 10:25:03 PM
Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt.

Really good book.


Right now I'm reading Elder Arsenios the Cave-Dweller - Fellow Ascetic of Elder Joseph the Hesychast. I've also recently finished reading Elder Paisios' Athonite Fathers and Athonite Matters which I have to say now ranks with one of my favorite books. If anyone hasn't read it, I highly suggest you do.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on November 11, 2008, 10:52:42 PM
More of the text for class. This week it was the governmental structure of Hungary. Tomorrow we start on China. 

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on November 12, 2008, 09:26:43 AM
Current reading:
Byzantium - Greatness and Decline, Charles Diehl. Rutgers Byzantine Series.


Also: Henry David Thoreau, "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience".
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on November 23, 2008, 06:02:55 PM
I've read The Non-Chalcedonian Heretics: A Contribution to the Dialogue Concerning the "Orthodoxy" of the Non-Chalcedonians a few times now, though I'm still not sure that I understand every charge that they are making. Most of the charges can be summed up in this paragraph on p. 17-18 though: "Severos distinguishes between essence and nature, equates nature with hypostasis, understands the hypostatic union differently from the Holy Fathers, distinguishes between hypostasis and person, ascribes will and energy to the person and not to the nature, and finally, does not have an Orthodox understanding of how the assumed Humanity of Christ is Deified." There is also an attempt to link the non-chalcedonian position with iconoclasm, that Severos is a monoenergist, to say that the Oriental Orthodox do not follow St. Cyril fully, that the Theopaschite addition to the Trisagion was a bad innovation, and so forth.

Unfortunately there isn't a lot of depth to the study, presumably because of lack of materials to be used and examined by them from the Oriental Orthodox side. Generally the charges against Severos are based on one (or perhaps two) quotes alone. These quotes are then compared with one or two quotes from Orthodox Fathers, almost always at least one by St. John of Damascus. The booklet is a very interesting read, but remains largely unconvincing, because it needs to be fleshed out more. It's definitely recommended if you're wondering what christological objections orthodox traditionalists have against the talks with Oriental Orthodox Christians.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on November 24, 2008, 02:40:35 PM
This week, I'm reading about the governmental structure of Egypt and I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell

edited to correct the book title
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on November 24, 2008, 02:54:34 PM
I'm reading "Tolkien and the Great War" by John Garth. 

Quote from: Ebor
I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell

I've started that book twice now and can't really get into it.  It's a shame because it appears to be right up my alley. :(
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on November 24, 2008, 08:44:53 PM
I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell


I loved that book!  It's a little slow-moving but the story is interesting.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Marc Hanna on November 24, 2008, 09:15:11 PM
The Council of Chalcedon and the Armenian Church - Korekin I
On Wealth and Poverty - St. John Chrysostom
On The Unity of Christ - St Cyril of Alexandria
Η ΚΑΙΝΗ ΔΙΑΘΗΚΗ - O Θεος και οι αποστολοι
The Ante-Nicene Fathers - various
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on November 25, 2008, 04:27:02 PM
Just started The City of God by St. Augustine. Absolutely amazing work.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Andrew21091 on November 25, 2008, 08:50:39 PM
I'm reading the Northern Thebaid: Monastic Saints of the Russian North. I've had the book for a while and I don't know why it took me so long to start reading it. It's a really great book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on November 25, 2008, 09:45:18 PM
Religion and Social Formation in Korea: Minjung and Millenarianism by Sang Taek Lee

Living the Liturgy by Stanley S. Harakas
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on November 26, 2008, 11:20:17 AM
I'm reading "Tolkien and the Great War" by John Garth. 

Quote from: Ebor
I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell

I've started that book twice now and can't really get into it.  It's a shame because it appears to be right up my alley. :(

I'd like to read Tolkien and the Great War some time.  This is, I think, the third time I started Strange/Norrell and I've managed to get about a third of the way in.  There's a book of shorter stories set in the same 'world' The Ladies of Grace Adieu which I'd gotten from the library after my last attempt and I enjoyed it. It might have helped ease the way in to the big novel, as it were.  It also might have been useful that I'm reading it from a 3 book set, so it's easier to carry about instead of a Tome.  ;)

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on November 26, 2008, 11:21:14 AM
I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell


I loved that book!  It's a little slow-moving but the story is interesting.

I quite agree with you on that.  Have you read the short stories that I mentioned to Schultz?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on November 26, 2008, 06:38:20 PM
I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell


I loved that book!  It's a little slow-moving but the story is interesting.

I quite agree with you on that.  Have you read the short stories that I mentioned to Schultz?

No, I didn't realize they existed.  I'll have to check them out.  FWIW, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell gets a lot more exciting in the last third of the book.  It seems like she takes a long time to build up the characters and history behind them and then she starts tying up loose ends suddenly.  Wasn't this her first novel?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: DanM on November 26, 2008, 10:58:28 PM
I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell


I loved that book!  It's a little slow-moving but the story is interesting.

I quite agree with you on that.  Have you read the short stories that I mentioned to Schultz?

No, I didn't realize they existed.  I'll have to check them out.  FWIW, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell gets a lot more exciting in the last third of the book.  It seems like she takes a long time to build up the characters and history behind them and then she starts tying up loose ends suddenly.  Wasn't this her first novel?

My father, a United Methodist man of the cloth, loves the book.  He claims it is an elaborate satire on Methodism. 
DanM
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on November 28, 2008, 11:51:03 AM
I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell


I loved that book!  It's a little slow-moving but the story is interesting.

I quite agree with you on that.  Have you read the short stories that I mentioned to Schultz?

No, I didn't realize they existed.  I'll have to check them out.  FWIW, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell gets a lot more exciting in the last third of the book.  It seems like she takes a long time to build up the characters and history behind them and then she starts tying up loose ends suddenly.  Wasn't this her first novel?

My father, a United Methodist man of the cloth, loves the book.  He claims it is an elaborate satire on Methodism. 
DanM

That sounds rather like something that would have fit in the time and setting of the book and it intrigues me.  Would you please explain a bit about your father's idea?  This could be a good literary discussion, I think.

Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: DanM on November 28, 2008, 04:16:27 PM
DIXI  My father, a United Methodist man of the cloth, loves the book.  He claims it is an elaborate satire on Methodism. 

EBOR DIXIT  That sounds rather like something that would have fit in the time and setting of the book and it intrigues me.  Would you please explain a bit about your father's idea?  This could be a good literary discussion, I think.

DICO  1st, note that the author is the daughter of a Methodist clergyman.  Then observe that you find in the beginning of the book a meeting of magicians who do no magic, but like to talk about its history:  he felt that mirrored his Methodist seminary.  The title characters were eccentric because they actually did magic:  one apparently does find the occasional believer, even in the faculty of a seminary.  This reminds me of a conversation I had with an English pastor who recalled classmates at Cambridge who would from time to time ask their seminary professors if they actually believed what they were teaching, and the retort was, "No, of course we don't."
Two comparable authors deserve mention:  Tolkien's crypto-Catholic Middle Earth and Calvinist Rowling's Harry (It's your destiny) Potter.

DanM


DanM
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on December 03, 2008, 01:12:12 PM
Truth and Tolerance, Cardinal Ratzinger/Pope Benedict

Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma, Cardinal Ratzinger/Pope Benedict
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on December 03, 2008, 02:21:05 PM
DIXI  My father, a United Methodist man of the cloth, loves the book.  He claims it is an elaborate satire on Methodism. 

EBOR DIXIT  That sounds rather like something that would have fit in the time and setting of the book and it intrigues me.  Would you please explain a bit about your father's idea?  This could be a good literary discussion, I think.

DICO  1st, note that the author is the daughter of a Methodist clergyman.  Then observe that you find in the beginning of the book a meeting of magicians who do no magic, but like to talk about its history:  he felt that mirrored his Methodist seminary.  The title characters were eccentric because they actually did magic:  one apparently does find the occasional believer, even in the faculty of a seminary.  This reminds me of a conversation I had with an English pastor who recalled classmates at Cambridge who would from time to time ask their seminary professors if they actually believed what they were teaching, and the retort was, "No, of course we don't."
Two comparable authors deserve mention:  Tolkien's crypto-Catholic Middle Earth and Calvinist Rowling's Harry (It's your destiny) Potter.

DanM


DanM

Interesting indeed!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Órëlaurëa on December 04, 2008, 06:26:52 PM
No, I didn't realize they existed.  I'll have to check them out.  FWIW, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell gets a lot more exciting in the last third of the book.  It seems like she takes a long time to build up the characters and history behind them and then she starts tying up loose ends suddenly.  Wasn't this her first novel?

Liz has the Ladies of Grace Adieu. . . but likely it's all packed away, so it does you no good whatsoever.

I tried to read Jonathan Strange, but couldn't get into it at all. I recently picked up the hardcover for $1, and it is resting upon my reading shelf as we speak. Perhaps someday I'll get back to trying it again. :D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. George on December 08, 2008, 06:49:22 PM
Working on yet another reading of Runciman's The Fall of Constantinople.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Lily on December 08, 2008, 08:56:27 PM
Currently reading :

The latest issue of Smithsonian
The Pale Horse by Agatha Christie (this is for work.  sort of.)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. George on December 08, 2008, 09:04:12 PM
The Pale Horse by Agatha Christie (this is for work.  sort of.)

That's my kind of work!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on December 09, 2008, 01:36:38 PM
DICO  1st, note that the author is the daughter of a Methodist clergyman.  Then observe that you find in the beginning of the book a meeting of magicians who do no magic, but like to talk about its history:  he felt that mirrored his Methodist seminary.  The title characters were eccentric because they actually did magic:  one apparently does find the occasional believer, even in the faculty of a seminary.  This reminds me of a conversation I had with an English pastor who recalled classmates at Cambridge who would from time to time ask their seminary professors if they actually believed what they were teaching, and the retort was, "No, of course we don't."
Two comparable authors deserve mention:  Tolkien's crypto-Catholic Middle Earth and Calvinist Rowling's Harry (It's your destiny) Potter.
DanM

Thank you, DanM.  That is indeed interesting.

I do not think that Harry Potter is all destiny, though.  The point about having choices and doing what's right is also part of the world that Rowling created.

If you have time, could you expand a bit on Tolkien and Rowling, please?

Oh yes, and my class reading is on the political structure of Nigeria.


Ebor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Andrea on December 09, 2008, 01:43:11 PM
I saw it referenced here on this website, so I picked up From the Holy Mountain: Among the Christians of the Middle East by Dalrymple. It's fascinating!

And I found a neat little book called How to Live a Holy Life by Metropolitan Gregory of Saint Petersburg, that I'm slowing working through.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Lily on December 09, 2008, 01:47:08 PM
The Pale Horse by Agatha Christie (this is for work.  sort of.)

That's my kind of work!

Less glam than it sounds, but it's certainly more palatable than plowing thru Titus Andronicus was!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on December 11, 2008, 12:10:34 PM
I'm slowly reading A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson and Alton Brown's I'm Just Here for the Food.  I think both of these should be used as textbooks... they're very informative and interesting and you don't typically get those in the same book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on December 11, 2008, 12:40:51 PM
I just began Orhan Pamuk's Snow, about (among other things) the conflict between Muslims and Christians in Istanbul. I bought in when he first wrote it about five years ago, but priorities caused me to delay reading it. I'm really glad I finally did get to, though. He's a talented writer who uses a nonchalant style that makes the story seem somewhat distant. It's quite interesting to me.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on December 11, 2008, 09:25:33 PM
Just finished "The Vampire Lestat" and "Queen of the Damned" by Anne Rice. If one likes that sort of thing, they are excellent and thrilling reading; even if they are inclined to meander in a few places. For the moment, I'm left without any vampire books to read; which is kind of sad.  :'(







Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on December 15, 2008, 08:28:27 AM
^ Have you read Twilight? All the teenagers want to read this during all their classes, so I can say with all certainty that it is more interesting to a teenager than school.

Sigh. It's a snow day.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on December 15, 2008, 01:02:45 PM
^ Have you read Twilight? All the teenagers want to read this during all their classes, so I can say with all certainty that it is more interesting to a teenager than school.

Sigh. It's a snow day.
I'm praying for a snow day tomorrow. LOL
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on December 23, 2008, 12:27:16 AM
I recently started Universalism by J.W. Hanson, after seeing it recommended as being a text which evidences early Christian belief in the doctrine of universalism. I'm about 1/5th of the way through, and so far I have been less than impressed by it. For one thing, there is quite a bit of arguing from silence; e.g. the entire chapter on the Creeds is almost a continuous argument from silence. He also quotes so many things and tries to make so many points that he sometimes seems to contradict himself. And the footnotes, at least in the version that I have, are nearly useless, though he gives references for only a small portion of the quotes that he supplies anyway. Thus far it has been a major let down for me, as I was hoping for something scholarly and well-reasoned, which is how it was portrayed.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on December 23, 2008, 05:33:15 AM
^ Have you read Twilight? All the teenagers want to read this during all their classes, so I can say with all certainty that it is more interesting to a teenager than school.


No, I haven't, but I have it on my wishlist. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on December 25, 2008, 06:32:43 AM
I had some free time tonight/this morning, so I read three small booklets by Abba Seraphim, who is "Head of the British Orthodox Church within the Coptic Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria". The first book was The Orthodox Church and Ecumenism: Present and Future (69 pp.), which was, as one might guess, about ecumenism and the Oriental Orthodox Church. I thought that it followed a nice "middle path" between extremes on either side, which is something that it set out to do. I was suprised by some of what I read, though, such as the strong (if brief) condemnation of creationism. The second book was The Importance and Contribution of the Oriental Orthodox Churches Today (36 pp.), which gave a brief overview of the history and culture of the Oriental Orthodox Churches. I found this small introduction to be an engaging read, and much enjoyed it. The third book was Scripture and Tradition (64 pp.), which, you guessed it, was about scripture and tradition and the interplay between them. The book gave fairly introductory remarks on the subject, and also went into some depth about the place of tradition in the Orthodox Church, and also discussed Orthodox/Protestant similarities and differences at (relative) length.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on December 30, 2008, 11:53:26 AM
I'm in a C.S. Lewis phase right now during my holiday break. I've been reading Perelandra, which is the sequel (sort of) to Out of the Silent Planet.  I would highly recommend Perelandra for its allegory.  Then I plan to start on Till We Have Faces.  I also just finished Sir Steven Runcimann's seminal work 1453:  The Fall of Constantinople.  I'm so glad to have these days off to catch up on my reading.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Eleos on December 30, 2008, 02:29:02 PM
^ I have 1453: The Fall of Constantinople on my shelf, hoping to read it soon.  How was it?  I just finished:
The Forgotten Man by Amity Schlaes, a fascinating history of the Great Depression,

Crash Proof by Peter Schiff, a great book about economics and especially about the current economic situation, highly recommended.

ETHIOPIA: THE CLASSIC CASE,  A biblical nation under God that survived great trials for 7490 years of its existence and ordained to invoke divine judgment and condemnation upon he world! Will the Present Generation of Humanity Hearken This Time To The Divine Warning In Order To Avert Another Imminent Universal Cataclysm?: THE MESSAGE Delivered by Ermias Kebede Wolde-Yesus, Nibure-Id.  Sometimes a very wordy book to the point of rambling, yet a very informative book about the classic and ancient Ethiopian identity as the covenantal nation of the people of God by the currently exiled high priest of Axum.  Very interesting information from Ethiopian tradition about the identity of Melchizedek and his relationship to the identity of Jesus Christ and the Theotokos, concepts of racial unity, concepts of freedom, the 7 covenants preserved by Ethiopians starting with the marriage of Adam and Eve and finalizing in the Eucharist made possible through the life of Jesus Christ and the Holy Virgin Mary.

I'm currently reading the Wisdom of Sirach in the Orthodox Study Bible
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on December 30, 2008, 05:14:27 PM
^ I have 1453: The Fall of Constantinople on my shelf, hoping to read it soon.  How was it? 

It was good.  He tells the history in a nice narrative fashion.  He has good notes on sources and two appendices.  I recommend anything he has written. Unfortunately, a lot of his works are now out of print, but if you can find them in a library, works like The Byzantine Theocracy or the Byzantine Empire are excellent and seminal works on the history of Constantinople up to the fall in 1453.  Other works that are not out of print are his histories of the crusdaes and 1280:  Sicilian Vespers.   He is the best expert on the history of Byzantium.  John Julius Norwich is adequate but no where near the calibre of Runcimann.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on December 31, 2008, 04:25:12 AM
I recently borrowed two books from the local public library (I'm starting to get quite a stack of books next to the bed!) The first one is Christainity & Paganism in the Fourth to Eighth Centuries, by Ramsay MacMullen. I must admit that his writing is quite clumsy at times, as for example in this sentence: "Quite remarkably alive to a quite remarkable date was the Nile festival celebrated on the night of January 5th to 6th at Giza, within sight of the Great Sphinx on the banks of the river, when those banks and an island in midstream were illuminated by thousands of torches." (p. 40) Not that my writing isn't also clumsy at times! Anyway, the main point he is trying to get across is that paganism wasn't stamped out in the Christian Roman Empire as quickly as most had previously thought. Overall I've enjoyed the book, though it had a slow start and is only slowly building up in speed.

The second book is When Women Were Priests: Women's Leadership in the Early Church & the Scandal of their Subordination in the Rise of Christianity, by Karen Jo Torjesen. I love my wife's reaction to these type of books, as she doesn't understand why I like to read books that I probably disagree with. The main point being put forward by this book is, you guessed it, that there were women priests (and bishops!) in early Christianity. So far--I'm about 60 pages in--the book has been less than convincing, and not a lot of evidence has been put forward to evidence the main point being made. I do have to admit, though, that if what little that has been put forward is indeed true, then I might have to reconsider my view on the female priesthood. This is definitely one of those subjects where I'm gonna end up having to do a lot more reading. Unfortunately Torjesen doesn't provide a bibliography, so I'm gonna probably end up combing through the footnotes looking for books that look promising.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on December 31, 2008, 04:32:18 AM
Fatal Purity: Robespierre and the French Revolution by Ruth Scurr
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on December 31, 2008, 11:16:34 AM
I'm in a C.S. Lewis phase right now during my holiday break. I've been reading Perelandra, which is the sequel (sort of) to Out of the Silent Planet.  I would highly recommend Perelandra for its allegory.  Then I plan to start on Till We Have Faces.  I also just finished Sir Steven Runcimann's seminal work 1453:  The Fall of Constantinople.  I'm so glad to have these days off to catch up on my reading.

Do you have That Hideous Strength the third of the "Space" books?  I'd be very interested in your thoughts on Till We Have Faces, if you'd be willing to post on that.


Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on December 31, 2008, 02:25:23 PM

Do you have That Hideous Strength the third of the "Space" books?  I'd be very interested in your thoughts on Till We Have Faces, if you'd be willing to post on that.

I'm finishing up Palendara right now but I have yet to read Out of the Silent Planet and I've not heard of The Hideous Strength until you mentioned it.  When I finish Till We Have Faces, I'd be glad to share my thoughts.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: _Seraphim_ on January 15, 2009, 11:41:03 PM
Re-appreciating the 1st volume of the Philokalia…

These words of encouragement found me at the most needful of times:

“No stain is intrinsic.  If a man has tar on his hands, he removes it with at little cleansing oil; how much more, then, can you be made clean with the oil of God’s mercy?  You find no difficulty in washing your clothes; how much easier is it for the Lord to cleanse you from every stain, although you are bound to be temped every day?  When you say to the Lord, ‘I have sinned’, He answers: ‘Your sins are forgiven you; I am He who wipes them out and I will remember them no more.’”  (sweat tears of joy emoticon)
(Matthew 9:2; Isaiah 43:25)
-St John of Karpathos
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Eleos on January 16, 2009, 02:11:33 AM
I'm currently listening to:
The Rise and Fall of Alexandria: Birthplace of the Modern World (http://www.audible.com/adbl/site/products/ProductDetail.jsp?productID=BK_TANT_000299&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes) by Justin Pollard and Howard Reid.  Outstanding listen/read so far, after only about 2 hours into the 12 hour audiobook version.  This book tells the history of the city of Alexandria and its contribution/relationship to world culture and the peoples behind it.  Now I want to go visit and see it today.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ian Lazarus on January 16, 2009, 08:40:17 AM
The back of a diet soda can....ICK
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on February 04, 2009, 10:09:29 AM
Vol 2 (A Clash of Kings) of George R.R. Martin's series, A Song of Ice and Fire.  How did I ever miss reading these books years ago?  They are fantastic.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on February 04, 2009, 12:43:28 PM
The Problem of Pain - C.S. Lewis
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on February 04, 2009, 03:38:15 PM
A (Catholic) student of mine gave me a book called O, Holy Mountain! by Fr. Basil Pennington, a Trappist monk who lived on Mt. Athos for an extended period, much longer than normally granted non-Orthodox visitors.  It is essentially is daily journal.  He records his conversations with various monks and spiritual fathers, as well as other guests to the Holy Mountain, whether Greek, Russian, American, etc.  It is a good read and really quite descriptive as to what goes on on the Holy Mountain, though this was published over 30 years ago.  Although he is quite frankly mistaken on many Orthodox beliefs and he goes to great simplistic lengths to comment on why union with Rome should no longer be an obstacle since he thinks all of our beliefs are the same, it is quite obvious that he is touched a great deal by his stay on Athos and I can only hope that what I read here prepares me for when I have the opportunity to visit the Holy Mountain for myself.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: HandmaidenofGod on February 04, 2009, 03:41:53 PM
For the Life of the World, Fr. Alexander Schmemann
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on February 04, 2009, 05:48:37 PM
A (Catholic) student of mine gave me a book called O, Holy Mountain! by Fr. Basil Pennington, a Trappist monk who lived on Mt. Athos for an extended period, much longer than normally granted non-Orthodox visitors.  It is essentially is daily journal.  He records his conversations with various monks and spiritual fathers, as well as other guests to the Holy Mountain, whether Greek, Russian, American, etc.  It is a good read and really quite descriptive as to what goes on on the Holy Mountain, though this was published over 30 years ago.  Although he is quite frankly mistaken on many Orthodox beliefs and he goes to great simplistic lengths to comment on why union with Rome should no longer be an obstacle since he thinks all of our beliefs are the same, it is quite obvious that he is touched a great deal by his stay on Athos and I can only hope that what I read here prepares me for when I have the opportunity to visit the Holy Mountain for myself.

It's got to be better than a book I read a few months ago called Paradise Besieged by Richard John Friedlander.  Think Anthony Bourdain meets Athonite monk.  So many people want to read about Mount Athos from an insider's view but it's only edifying when the person doing the chronicle has a solid, stable Orthodox faith, isn't prone to unhealthy zealotry and obsessiveness that eventually turns into cynicism, and doesn't bore you to death with his sexual stuggles and conquests.   There were a few moments of genuine insight and edification, but if you're a new convert or not too strong in Orthodoxy, this book is a soul killer.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 04, 2009, 09:40:11 PM
"Night Watch", by Sergei Lukynenko.

In the process of reading "The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief". Finding it interesting, but I have been sidetracked by "The Mummy", by Anne Rice, "The Alchemist's Daughter", by Katharine Mcmahon and "Twilight", by Stephanie Meyers (so rivetting, that I have ordered two more in the series). I had better get LOG finished before they arrive. ;D

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on February 05, 2009, 08:37:25 AM
"Night Watch", by Sergei Lukynenko.

In the process of reading "The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief". Finding it interesting, but I have been sidetracked by "The Mummy", by Anne Rice, "The Alchemist's Daughter", by Katharine Mcmahon and "Twilight", by Stephanie Meyers (so rivetting, that I have ordered two more in the series). I had better get LOG finished before they arrive. ;D


R - the slash and burn comments of Stephen King obviously didn't put you off reading Twilight did they.  He really slammed the books for their writing which I thought was a little like the pot calling the kettle black.  Who cares what someone thinks about another authors' story or writing style, you're the one who's enjoying it.  Each to his own.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 05, 2009, 08:57:30 PM
"Night Watch", by Sergei Lukynenko.

In the process of reading "The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief". Finding it interesting, but I have been sidetracked by "The Mummy", by Anne Rice, "The Alchemist's Daughter", by Katharine Mcmahon and "Twilight", by Stephanie Meyers (so rivetting, that I have ordered two more in the series). I had better get LOG finished before they arrive. ;D


R - the slash and burn comments of Stephen King obviously didn't put you off reading Twilight did they.  He really slammed the books for their writing which I thought was a little like the pot calling the kettle black.  Who cares what someone thinks about another authors' story or writing style, you're the one who's enjoying it.  Each to his own.

Nah, I don't let any critic put me off deciding what I will read. My enjoyment of a book isn't anchored on it being great prose. If I can't stop turning the pages, it was something I consider it a good read. As you say; each to his own.  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on February 06, 2009, 10:46:59 AM
Right now - my sudents' midterm exam  ;D

The Homilies on Hexaemeron of St. Basil the Great, in a Russian translation (http://www.wco.ru/biblio/books/vasilv2/Main.htm).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Νεκτάριος on February 07, 2009, 06:23:14 PM
Right now - my sudents' midterm exam  ;D

The Homilies on Hexaemeron of St. Basil the Great, in a Russian translation (http://www.wco.ru/biblio/books/vasilv2/Main.htm).

Yikes!  I just finished the third week of my semester and you're already giving midterms!? 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on February 07, 2009, 06:38:03 PM
Right now - my sudents' midterm exam  ;D

The Homilies on Hexaemeron of St. Basil the Great, in a Russian translation (http://www.wco.ru/biblio/books/vasilv2/Main.htm).

Yikes!  I just finished the third week of my semester and you're already giving midterms!? 

Ah, that's just another experiment... dividing the material into smaller portions and giving more exams during the semester...  :-\
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. George on February 08, 2009, 12:41:45 AM
I'm taking a break from Washington's bio to read Eisenhower's memoirs from the war - Crusade in Europe.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on February 08, 2009, 08:54:47 PM
(http://www.stspress.com/images/books/SP676l.jpg)

Elder Paisios of Mount Athos - Athonite Fathers and Athonite Matters
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Bono Vox on February 08, 2009, 09:26:10 PM
Introduction to statistical analysis for the behavioral sciences..................zzzzzzzzzz :(
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Νεκτάριος on February 08, 2009, 11:13:47 PM
I just read a short story by Andrei Platonov called "The River Potudan" (Река Потудань).  All I could find was this summary in English:
https://segue1community.middlebury.edu/index.php?action=site&site=dparker&section=20785&page=90984 (https://segue1community.middlebury.edu/index.php?action=site&site=dparker&section=20785&page=90984)

Unfortunately it focuses on the sex way too much (which was a minor part of the story) and misses the big picture to an extent.  The idea one of my professors put forth is that Nikita was suffering from PTSD and this is Platonov's literary presentation of it, long before psychologists began to understand it.  It is definitely worth the read, and it is quite brief. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Bogoliubtsy on February 08, 2009, 11:26:38 PM
Most recent few, from the past week:

Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory: A Journey into the Evangelical Subculture in America- Randall Balmer

American Jesus: How the Son of God Became a National Icon-  Stephen Prothero

There Goes the Hood: Views of Gentrification from the Ground Up - Lance Freeman

Prothero's was probably the most interesting. It explores America's changing understanding of Jesus from Jefferson to the present day ( It may suffer from taking too much of an emblematic approach, but still pretty good.) From amazon: From Thomas Jefferson's cut-and-paste Bible to Jesus Christ Superstar, from the feminized Christ of the Victorians to the "manly redeemer" of Teddy Roosevelt's era, from Buddhist bodhisattva to Black Moses, Prothero surveys the myriad ways Americans have remade Jesus in their own image.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on February 09, 2009, 02:41:13 AM
Persian Mirrors: The Elusive Face of Iran by Elaine Sciolino.

Cafe Europa: Life After Communism and How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed both by Slavenka Drakulic.  I'm always amazed at the enigma that is the Balkans.  Truly amazing people.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on February 18, 2009, 09:44:48 AM
Continuing my reading of the Rutgers Byzantine Series I just completed Origins of the Greek Nation, The Byzantine Period 1204-1461 by Apostolos E. Vacalopoulos.
As a recent poster in this thread made comment that there were not enough reviews in this thread, I must elaborate on the work.
First, it dispelled some preconceptions, false ones, I had about "Greeks" - both ancient and modern. I had always assumed that modern Greeks were more of a recent invention with little real connection to the ancient Hellenes. AND I had assumed, as many here also, that "Roman", referring to Byzantine (East Roman),  meant a multi-ethnic political entity. In fact this was so, but not for the entire East Roman period. Vacalopoulos points out that by 1204 the empire had in fact been reduced to an area populated alomost exclusively by Hellenes who were awakening to their ancient Hellenic roots. Previously "Hellene" connoted pagan, while "Roman" meant Christian. By 1204, this had changed and the Greek Byzantines were employing BOTH terms in self description.
Yes, there was some absorbing of Serbs, Vlachs and Albanians, but for the most part the Greeks knew they were , well, Greek. Their 'country" was the empire (in reduced area). Now I understand the "Great Idea" of reconquering Constantinople, Pontus, Ionia. The empire - now less Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Armenia - was "Greek country" by then.
The book goes further detailing the effects of the Turkish take-over of the Hellenic area - the quick apostasy of the aristocrats wishing to preserve wealth and the migrations west for those who could afford to do so. Sad stories are related of many of the Greeks and what they had to do to survive in the west, (Venice, Genoa, Spain). Most interesting were his descriptions of the Church filling the void for the ordinary Christians, now deserted by their landlords, orphaned by the emperor.

I may be a "Greek"-American but I don't think I can quite be so quick to judge a real Greek when he views the "Greek Orthodox Church" to be his church, for Greeks. Not that I agree with that sentiment (I don't) but I can understand it much better now.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on February 22, 2009, 11:19:53 AM
Just discovered for myself this book:

http://www.amazon.com/Historical-Road-Eastern-Orthodoxy/dp/0913836478

Proropresbyter Fr. Alexander Schmemann, "The Historical Road of Eastern Orthodoxy."

(I am, actually, reading it right now in its Russian original, Прот. о. Алeксандр Шмeман, "Историчeский путь Православия." http://www.wco.ru/biblio/books/shmeman1/Main.htm)

Incredibly beautiful, both content-wise and stylistically, narrative of the entire history of the Orthodox Church. Written in the form of lectures that Fr. Alexander actually gave, first at the St. Sergius Theological Institute in Paris and then at the St. Vladimir Seminary in Crestwood, N.Y., in 1945-1951.

I am not sure who translated this series of lectures into English (it could have been Fr. Alexander himself, or maybe someone else), and I actually do not even want to read it in English. For all of you who can read Russian, my very enthusiastic recommendation is to read this book in its original Russian. Fr. Alexander's language is just fantastically strong and beautiful. (Yes, that says I, the notorious Russophobe. :) )
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 22, 2009, 12:29:20 PM
Quote
Incredibly beautiful, both content-wise and stylistically, narrative of the entire history of the Orthodox Church.

We seem to have had very different reactions to this book ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on February 22, 2009, 03:12:09 PM
Quote
Incredibly beautiful, both content-wise and stylistically, narrative of the entire history of the Orthodox Church.

We seem to have had very different reactions to this book ;)

Really? What is yours? I don't remember you expressing an opinion about this book, honestly.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 22, 2009, 03:43:03 PM
Overall I guess I liked it to some extent (after all, I did go to the trouble of finishing it), though I seem to remember not liking the way he dealt with St. Justinian very much. I might have a totally different view were I to read it again though, this was probably 6 or 7 years ago that I read it.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on March 03, 2009, 05:57:58 PM
I'm about half way through Little Brother by Cory Doctorow and I think it's very good.  It's about near future San Francisco where due to a terrorist attack the DHS has taken to tracking everyone as much as possible. A high school student and three friends were arrested during the first hours after and subjected to interrogation and suspicion that they were terrorists because the main character has his phone and other files on his electronics under good passwords and the feds want to know what he has. Doctorow writes well including about such things as Bayesian math (used in spam filters among other things) and the Paradox of the False Positive as well as speaking out on the Bill of Rights and personal freedom and privacy. 

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on March 03, 2009, 07:38:18 PM
Just finished the Twilight Series; a total of four books; Twilight, Eclipse, New Moon, Breaking Dawn. Personally, I find this vampiric saga commendable, especially as it's young adult fiction. While the prose might not be the greatest in the history of literature, this romantic tale is a compelling enough read to keep those pages turning. I particularly like the way that Ms Meyers has portrayed the prominent vampires in the books as determined not the take human life and retaining the moral standards of the bygone times when they were still human.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on March 10, 2009, 12:25:36 AM
Living Gnosticism: An Ancient Way of Knowing, by Jordan Stratford
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on March 10, 2009, 01:01:48 AM
The Path To Salvation; A Manual of Spiritual Transformation by St. Theophan the Recluse.  I'm so far from being even a third of where I should be as an Orthodox Christian.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: rwprof on March 10, 2009, 03:25:50 PM
This is just a thread to ask what everyone is reading.  Till Wendsday I will be reading nothing other than textbooks, but after that---ooh man do I ever have a stack to get through.  As soon as I am done with my finals, I am making it top priority to finish Law of God.

Joe Zollars

I hate to be dull, but as a private devotion for Great Lent, I am reading the Bible (the new OT/NT Orthodox Study Bible). Oh. I also picked up a copy of the Language of God, because I didn't read it when it came out.


Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on March 10, 2009, 04:28:20 PM
All of our books are still packed away in boxes, so alas, I am reading nothing at the moment.  As soon as I find the Bill Bryson box, though, I'll report back.  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on March 10, 2009, 04:42:01 PM
All of our books are still packed away in boxes, so alas, I am reading nothing at the moment.  As soon as I find the Bill Bryson box, though, I'll report back.  :)
Yes, rub it in. I'm working on it. ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on March 10, 2009, 04:48:51 PM
All of our books are still packed away in boxes, so alas, I am reading nothing at the moment.  As soon as I find the Bill Bryson box, though, I'll report back.  :)
Yes, rub it in. I'm working on it. ;)

A little nudge never hurt!   :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on March 12, 2009, 02:45:16 AM
Gnosticism: New Light on the Ancient Tradition of Inner Knowing, by Stephan A. Hoeller.

This is my second (and final) pro-gnostic book that I'm reading. Hopefully after that comes the more neutral, academic books. I have to say that I was very let down by Living Gnosticism. It's not that I expected to be convinced or anything, but I at least expected something a bit more informative. I left the book with little other than vague impressions about how gnosticism is more about myth and art than doctrine and dogma. So far, this new book seems to be a bit closer to what I was hoping for.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jonathan Gress on March 28, 2009, 07:04:18 PM
Well I just finished the Ladder of Divine Ascent (in time for the Sunday of John Climacus!).
It's obviously way too big to absorb in one reading. Since monastics traditionally read it every Lent, it obviously a lifetime, and more than a lifetime to fully assimilate. It's written with monastics primarily in mind, but any pious Orthodox can get something out of it (for instance, I already found it useful on e.g. the subject of attention in prayer and watchfulness over thoughts). But as a layman or laywoman, you should not immediately try to emulate the kind of asceticism he takes for granted!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on March 28, 2009, 07:13:06 PM
Pamela McCorduck's Machines Who Think and H. G. Wells' The Time Machine (for the 1000000th time  :laugh:)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on March 28, 2009, 09:29:30 PM
Well I just finished the Ladder of Divine Ascent (in time for the Sunday of John Climacus!).
SNAP! So did I!
Welcome to the forum Johnathan!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Myrrh23 on March 29, 2009, 11:08:32 PM
Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets
by Sudhir Venkatesh

I've been meaning to read that Ladder book. I'll do that, after the Sociologist book and while I'm reading the writings I found on this website: http://www.orthodox.net/articles/index.html#S13
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on March 30, 2009, 03:09:49 AM
Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets
by Sudhir Venkatesh
I remember hearing an interview on NPR with the author of this book.  I was really intrigued by the author's experience and lesson's he learned.  How do you like it so far?  I might pick it up after Lent.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Myrrh23 on March 30, 2009, 12:56:45 PM
Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets
by Sudhir Venkatesh
I remember hearing an interview on NPR with the author of this book.  I was really intrigued by the author's experience and lesson's he learned.  How do you like it so far?  I might pick it up after Lent.

G, the book is very engaging and down-to-earth! I like it very much! You should read it! :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on March 30, 2009, 03:43:44 PM
Gnosticism: New Light on the Ancient Tradition of Inner Knowing, by Stephan A. Hoeller.

This is my second (and final) pro-gnostic book that I'm reading. Hopefully after that comes the more neutral, academic books. I have to say that I was very let down by Living Gnosticism. It's not that I expected to be convinced or anything, but I at least expected something a bit more informative. I left the book with little other than vague impressions about how gnosticism is more about myth and art than doctrine and dogma. So far, this new book seems to be a bit closer to what I was hoping for.
Are you considering Gnosticism as an option for your spiritual life?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: cholmes on April 02, 2009, 04:51:45 PM
Time out of Joint - Philip K. Dick
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on April 02, 2009, 06:24:57 PM
I just got through reading two booklets, written by Archimandrite George, abbot of the monastery of St. Gregorios on Mt. Athos.  The first is "The Lord's Prayer" and the second is "Theosis:  The Purpose of Man's Life."  Both are very short and are just filled with such riches.  I highly recommend "Theosis" since I can remember no other book which so succintly and clearly articulates theosis and how Orthodox praxis and belief is so opposed to Western forms of Christianity.  Pick them up if you can.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on April 02, 2009, 06:59:23 PM
The Apostolic Fathers: Greek Texts and English Translations (Hardcover)
 (http://www.amazon.com/Apostolic-Fathers-Greek-English-Translations/dp/080103468X/ref=tag_dpp_lp_edpp_ttl_ex)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51MCZu8llDL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA240_SH20_OU01_.jpg)

A fresh translation with helpful introductions.  Really great for the modern English reader, despite the secular, academic and nonspiritual perspective of the commentary throughout the collection.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Justinian on April 02, 2009, 07:15:35 PM
Violence by Slavoj Zizek
How to Read Lacan by Slavoj Zizek
Lacan for Beginners by Various

I tend on a monthly basis to find some thinker to read and then abandon for the next one. I am slowly dumping Zizek for Lacan, and then I think it shall be either David Bentley Hart (again) or someone else for May...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on April 03, 2009, 10:30:05 AM
Rather than tell everyone what I am reading today, I thought I would post it (in its entirety).

Quote
Sailing to Byzantium - William Butler Yeats

THAT is no country for old men. The young
In one another's arms, birds in the trees
- Those dying generations - at their song,
The salmon-falls, the mackerel-crowded seas,
Fish, flesh, or fowl, commend all summer long
Whatever is begotten, born, and dies.
Caught in that sensual music all neglect
Monuments of unageing intellect.

An aged man is but a paltry thing,
A tattered coat upon a stick, unless
Soul clap its hands and sing, and louder sing
For every tatter in its mortal dress,
Nor is there singing school but studying
Monuments of its own magnificence;
And therefore I have sailed the seas and come
To the holy city of Byzantium.

O sages standing in God's holy fire
As in the gold mosaic of a wall,
Come from the holy fire, perne in a gyre,
And be the singing-masters of my soul.
Consume my heart away; sick with desire
And fastened to a dying animal
It knows not what it is; and gather me
Into the artifice of eternity.

Once out of nature I shall never take
My bodily form from any natural thing,
But such a form as Grecian goldsmiths make
Of hammered gold and gold enamelling
To keep a drowsy Emperor awake;
Or set upon a golden bough to sing
To lords and ladies of Byzantium
Of what is past, or passing, or to come.

Seems Yeats was not really a Roman Catholic Celt, or a Protestant one either, but like Tolstoy sort of invented his own religion. Here he seems on to something. This poem which was required reading in my high school junior English class has always been one of my favorites.

Later today I'll probably dig out some Howard Nemerov to read (for old times sake- I got literally quite intoxicated with Nemerov once).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on April 03, 2009, 04:44:47 PM
Reality and the Good - Josef Pieper
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on April 03, 2009, 05:09:57 PM
Dr. Amit Konar's Artificial Intelligence and Soft Computing: Behavioral and Cognitive Modeling of the Human Brain
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jonathan Gress on April 03, 2009, 06:47:53 PM
Other things I'm reading:

Principles of Linguistic Change: Volume 3 by William Labov (academic reading)
Explanation of Mark's Gospel by Bl Theophylact (spiritual reading)
What is Man? by Vladimir Moss (essays on psychology, art, Shakespearean drama and much more; fun reading)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on April 04, 2009, 02:23:04 AM
The One and the Many: A Contemporary Thomistic Metaphysics - W. NOrris Clarke, S.J.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: StGeorge on April 06, 2009, 01:02:10 PM
North and South, Elizabeth Gaskell.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. George on April 06, 2009, 01:04:31 PM
Been slowly working on A Noble Task: Entry into the Clergy in the First Five Centuries
by Lewis J. Patsavos (Translated by Norman Russell)

My Canon Law professor's doctoral dissertation for the University of Athens (hence why it needed to be translated).

Reading this again...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Lily on April 12, 2009, 09:32:14 PM
Finally broke down.  I'm reading Twilight, since my girlfriends tell me I'm alot like the main character.  (Considering I am a former ballerina, I'm not so sure it's a compliment!)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on April 13, 2009, 01:13:49 AM
Finally broke down.  I'm reading Twilight, since my girlfriends tell me I'm alot like the main character.  (Considering I am a former ballerina, I'm not so sure it's a compliment!)

LOL - that is funny!

I loved all the Twilight books.

Just finished reading "The Historian". Thanks to whoever it was on OC.net who recommended the book. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading it. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: mike on April 13, 2009, 11:53:19 AM
Maths and physics exercises collections and I think nothing else for the following month.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on April 13, 2009, 06:38:33 PM
I started Alan F. Chalmers's "What Is This Thing Called Science?" (Hackett Publishing Co., 3rd edition, 1999, ISBN 0-87220-452-9). Next fall semester, I'll be teaching an Honors course called "Philosophy of Science" (first time in my life, and first time in the history of my little university!), so I thought I should read this book. It's a difficult reading, in all honesty. Chalmers is a physicist and uses a lot of examples from physics, which aren't always very easy for me to understand. But I'll get through this book, hopefully...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Carl Kraeff (Second Chance) on April 13, 2009, 10:58:14 PM
Actually, I find myself bouncing between this forum, Wikipedia and other forums. I am so blessed to have so much information and points of view made available to me almost instantly. Another reason is that my eyes growing old and my large computer screen with increased font sizes is easier for me.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Dan-Romania on April 15, 2009, 03:44:50 AM
Hi  , I`ve heard during this lent a priest quoting something beautiful from a church father Gregory , i don`t remmeber wich Gregory , about the sky and the nature being ashamed of what we did to Jesus , that is why the sky darkened .. something like that it was touching . Can someone help me?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on April 15, 2009, 02:46:11 PM
The day before everything went down with my Father, he and my Mother gave me the Summa Theologiae by Thomas Aquinas. Quite a nice gift. I suppose I will be reading this continually.
Also, I plan to read the Dark Night of the Soul by St. John of the Cross here very shortly.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: StGeorge on April 19, 2009, 12:55:44 PM
Finished Gaskell's North and South today. 

Lucan's Civil War is next. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: mersch on May 12, 2009, 11:56:59 PM
"in the Heart of the Desert, The Spirituality of the Desert Fathers and Mothers, revised" by John Chryssavgis. I can't put it down. Seriously
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EmperorConstantine on May 21, 2009, 12:19:20 PM
"Nihilism: the Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age" by Fr. Seraphim Rose.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Douglas on May 21, 2009, 01:03:28 PM
At the Corner of East and Now by Frederica Matthewes-Green. I'm enjoying it immensely. Just two chapters to go.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on May 21, 2009, 01:52:57 PM
A Kartashev, "Ecumenical Councils" (in its original Russian, http://www.agioskanon.ru/hist-kartashev/001.htm).

Very interesting reading, exciting, emotional, reads very much like a historical novel with elements of a thriller! I can only imagine how students must have liked this Orthodox theology professor as their lecturer.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ironsiderodger on May 21, 2009, 02:49:50 PM
For the Life of the World- Fr Schmemann; truly a fantastic book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Rosehip on May 21, 2009, 03:35:55 PM
Finally broke down.  I'm reading Twilight, since my girlfriends tell me I'm alot like the main character.  (Considering I am a former ballerina, I'm not so sure it's a compliment!)

LOL - that is funny!

I loved all the Twilight books.

Just finished reading "The Historian". Thanks to whoever it was on OC.net who recommended the book. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading it. 

What is it about these "Twilight" books?? My best friend just told me today she was reading them, and I had no clue what she was talking about!! For me, "Twilight" means only one thing in the literary world: Elie Wiesel! One of my favourite books!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gabriel on May 21, 2009, 04:11:53 PM
What is it about these "Twilight" books?? My best friend just told me today she was reading them, and I had no clue what she was talking about!! For me, "Twilight" means only one thing in the literary world: Elie Wiesel! One of my favourite books!

Mix Johnny Depp and the Vampire L'estat together, then turn them into a sensitive teenage heart-throb.

Yep.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on May 21, 2009, 04:20:17 PM
The Orthodox Liturgy: The Development of the Eucharistic Liturgy in the Byzantine Rite by Hugh Wybrew. 

I only made it through the first three chapters.  I absolutely hated the narrative and its poor scholarship.  I honestly can not believe that St. Vladimir Seminary Press published this book.  It is so unorthodox in its understanding to the point that it is laughable.  Everything has a strong Protestant undertone of imperial corruption over the centuries, which ultimately made it too much of a bore to deal with.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Douglas on May 21, 2009, 05:16:43 PM
What is it about these "Twilight" books?? My best friend just told me today she was reading them, and I had no clue what she was talking about!! For me, "Twilight" means only one thing in the literary world: Elie Wiesel! One of my favourite books!

Mix Johnny Depp and the Vampire L'estat together, then turn them into a sensitive teenage heart-throb.

Yep.

Good description. They're vampire chick novels for the younger set although a few older folks (especially ladies) in their 30's do occasionally purchase them. I understand they're reasonably well written but certainly not to my taste.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Rosehip on May 21, 2009, 05:40:22 PM
What is it about these "Twilight" books?? My best friend just told me today she was reading them, and I had no clue what she was talking about!! For me, "Twilight" means only one thing in the literary world: Elie Wiesel! One of my favourite books!

Mix Johnny Depp and the Vampire L'estat together, then turn them into a sensitive teenage heart-throb.

Yep.

Good description. They're vampire chick novels for the younger set although a few older folks (especially ladies) in their 30's do occasionally purchase them. I understand they're reasonably well written but certainly not to my taste.

I've never been able to understand this fascination with vampires. Very odd. I think I'll stick with Wiesel any day.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on May 21, 2009, 05:50:45 PM
Isaac Asimov's "The Last Question".  By far my favourite short story.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on May 21, 2009, 06:24:56 PM
What is it about these "Twilight" books?? My best friend just told me today she was reading them, and I had no clue what she was talking about!! For me, "Twilight" means only one thing in the literary world: Elie Wiesel! One of my favourite books!

Mix Johnny Depp and the Vampire L'estat together, then turn them into a sensitive teenage heart-throb.

Yep.

Good description. They're vampire chick novels for the younger set although a few older folks (especially ladies) in their 30's do occasionally purchase them. I understand they're reasonably well written but certainly not to my taste.

Ha! I left my 30s behind many years ago and I love the "Twilight" books. But then, perhaps I'm an incurable romantic. I certainly hope so! ;) The books are reasonably well written, but more than being great prose they are page-turners. Whereas Anne Rice's books are certainly erotic and a little disturbing at times, Meyer's tales contain quaintly old-fashioned moral values. The hero, for instance, refuses to sleep with the heroine until they are married. They might be disdained as chick novels, but I consider them a worthy addition to the fantasy genre.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Rosehip on May 21, 2009, 07:17:17 PM
Well, it sounds as if the author has good morals and integrity, which is rare these days, so maybe I'll have to give it a go...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tallitot on May 21, 2009, 08:39:26 PM
I went through a vampire phase in my 20's, but it was mostly vampires in 50's sci-fi pulp readers...very different from the romance genre. I also like old black and white horror films.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on May 23, 2009, 10:58:30 PM
Charles Stross' Accelerando (http://www.jus.uio.no/sisu/accelerando.charles_stross/portrait.pdf)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: zoarthegleaner on May 25, 2009, 03:37:03 PM
Stations of the Cross: The Russian Orthodox Church 1970-1980 by Very Reverend Dimitriy Konstantinow.,
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Catherine on July 26, 2009, 09:35:26 PM
I'm reading Wonded by Love by Elder Porphyrios
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on July 26, 2009, 09:53:01 PM
John C. Wright's The Golden Age (I)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: The Iambic Pen on July 27, 2009, 12:54:58 AM
I'm doing another Lord of the Rings reading.  The last time I read it was before the films were released.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on July 27, 2009, 01:35:55 AM
Gore Vidal's Lincoln.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Catherine on July 28, 2009, 02:25:08 AM
I'm doing another Lord of the Rings reading.  The last time I read it was before the films were released.

 As we all know (ie. the LOTR geeks like myself :)),the new film will span the timeframe before LOTR;the film will start with Bilbo Baggins finding the ring, then (here's one for the girls. .) it will show the meeting of Aragorn and Arwen!  The 'Tale of Aragorn and Arwen' is one of Tolkien's best works, in my opinion. I cannot wait to see it  (Liv Tyler and Viggo Mortensen are set to reprise their roles as Aragorn and Arwen again ).

http://www.arwenandaragorn.com/information.html
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: pensateomnia on July 28, 2009, 09:40:06 AM
Vladimir Nabokov's Podvig, which he and his son translated as Glory.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ms.hoorah on August 02, 2009, 10:43:43 PM
Funding Evil:  How Terrorism is Financed and How to Stop It by Rachel Ehrenfeld
-An interesting book about how terrorism is financed

Perennial All-Stars by Jeff Cox
-A lovely book with many beautiful photos of perennial flowers

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Douglas on August 03, 2009, 12:25:07 AM
I'm just about to start "A Beginner's Guide to Prayer" by Fr Michael Keiser. I recently joined the St Philip's Prayer Discipline and this book arrived along with a copy of their prayer manual/book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on August 03, 2009, 04:13:34 AM
Can anyone recommend a good biography of Dostoevsky, preferably with emphasis on his Orthodoxy?

Also, what would you recommend by Dostoevsky after The Brothers Karamazov? I really liked that book, and I was thinking about The Idiot or Crime and Punishment.

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Aidan on August 03, 2009, 08:22:03 AM
You might care to read a recent biography of Dostoevsky by Dr Rowan Williams the (Anglican) Archbishop of Canterbury. Haven't read it myself but will get round to it perhaps.

Nothing quite matches The Brothers Karamazovin my opinion, but the others mentioned are well worth a read.

I thought the House of the Deadwas a strange book. Although autobiographical, Dostoevsky is such a great writer that he reports Muslim more sympathetically than Christian prisoners.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Aidan on August 03, 2009, 08:23:08 AM
Sorry about the presentation! Will try harder to get it right in future.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: fleur-de-lys on August 03, 2009, 01:04:07 PM
The Master and Margarita, by Mikhail Bulgakov.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on August 03, 2009, 05:35:26 PM
It's been a summer of mystery novels, currently Five Little Pigs by Agatha Christie.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Pilgrim on August 03, 2009, 07:37:30 PM
Luck of the devil:the story of operation valkyrie

Niccolo's Smile: A biography of Niccolo Machiavelli

A Mighty Fortress: A New history of the German people

Testimony (by the French President).

Facing Athens

plus a whole list to get to

Does anyone else have a problem with picking up new books when they have quite a few they have yet to finish and are halfway through? I always do that. No amount of telling myself "wait until you've finished the other one" seems to help, and I find it harder to remember what I'm reading when i do it this way too.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ortho_cat on August 03, 2009, 11:32:01 PM
I recently read "The Orthodox Church" (Ware) and just finished "The Orthodox Way" (Kallistos). The two best intro books, so I've heard.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on August 04, 2009, 04:22:39 AM
Luck of the devil:the story of operation valkyrie

Niccolo's Smile: A biography of Niccolo Machiavelli

A Mighty Fortress: A New history of the German people

Testimony (by the French President).

Facing Athens

plus a whole list to get to

Does anyone else have a problem with picking up new books when they have quite a few they have yet to finish and are halfway through? I always do that. No amount of telling myself "wait until you've finished the other one" seems to help, and I find it harder to remember what I'm reading when i do it this way too.

I have the same problem as well. I also have two other major problems with my reading habits:

1. I avoid fiction to a fault. I feel that somehow I'm wasting time if I'm reading fiction. Even with the classics, I still feel inclined to read nonfiction. I realize this is not healthy, but I just can't break out of this mindset. This is why I'm gonna try to read another Dostoevsky novel soon.

2. I am a slow reader because I am always underlining and making notes in the margins. I could never remember all that I read, so I make copious notes in my books so I can refer back to them when I need to do so. This slows me down a lot.

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: 88Devin12 on August 04, 2009, 10:40:17 AM
Orthodox Prayer Life: The Interior Way by Matthew the Poor
published by St. Vladimir's Seminary Press

after that, I hope to move on to reading:

The Spiritual Life and How to Be Attuned To It by St. Theophan the Recluse
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on August 04, 2009, 10:55:58 AM
Celtic Myths and Legends (http://www.amazon.com/Celtic-Myths-Legends-Peter-Berresford/dp/0786711078) by Peter Berresford Ellis.  It contains 6 or so stories from each of the various Celtic traditions of the British Isles as retold by Mr. Ellis, who does a superb job in both retelling the stories and naming his sources.  I only have time to read one story or so a night before bed, but it's well worth it.  This has sat on my shelf for a very long time without being read.  It's now getting the reading it deserves.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Pilgrim on August 04, 2009, 11:45:52 PM
Luck of the devil:the story of operation valkyrie

Niccolo's Smile: A biography of Niccolo Machiavelli

A Mighty Fortress: A New history of the German people

Testimony (by the French President).

Facing Athens

plus a whole list to get to

Does anyone else have a problem with picking up new books when they have quite a few they have yet to finish and are halfway through? I always do that. No amount of telling myself "wait until you've finished the other one" seems to help, and I find it harder to remember what I'm reading when i do it this way too.

I have the same problem as well. I also have two other major problems with my reading habits:

1. I avoid fiction to a fault. I feel that somehow I'm wasting time if I'm reading fiction. Even with the classics, I still feel inclined to read nonfiction. I realize this is not healthy, but I just can't break out of this mindset. This is why I'm gonna try to read another Dostoevsky novel soon.

2. I am a slow reader because I am always underlining and making notes in the margins. I could never remember all that I read, so I make copious notes in my books so I can refer back to them when I need to do so. This slows me down a lot.

Selam

That happens to me as well. I always find it hard to retain what i read (which explains my biology grades :P). and I
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EmperorConstantine on August 05, 2009, 05:52:04 AM
Presently finishing, "Shepherd of Souls" about Elder Cleopa of Sihastria.


After that, probably "Notes from Underground" by Dostoyevsky.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on August 05, 2009, 04:29:13 PM
I'm very slowly working on Life of Pi by Yann Martel.  It's a fantastic, engaging read but it's hard to get through even a page or two with a toddler running around.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Catherine on August 06, 2009, 03:32:58 PM
Orthodox Dogmatic Theology by Protopresbetyr Michael Pomazansky
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Fr. George on August 06, 2009, 04:24:47 PM
Partakers of Divine Nature, by Archimandrite Fr. Christoforos Stavropoulos (transl. by Fr. Stanley Harakas).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jetavan on August 06, 2009, 07:07:44 PM
I'm very slowly working on Life of Pi by Yann Martel.  It's a fantastic, engaging read but it's hard to get through even a page or two with a toddler running around.
Have you reached the part with the rabbi, priest, and imam? ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ortho_cat on August 07, 2009, 02:40:07 AM
Just read "The Way" by Carlton, and am now reading "The Faith" by the same author.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: mersch on August 07, 2009, 06:37:48 AM
The Way of a pilgram
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on August 07, 2009, 11:07:02 AM
I'm very slowly working on Life of Pi by Yann Martel.  It's a fantastic, engaging read but it's hard to get through even a page or two with a toddler running around.
Have you reached the part with the rabbi, priest, and imam? ;D

I'm just now getting to that chapter!  Sounds like the set up to a joke. :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ortho_cat on August 20, 2009, 10:11:10 PM
I'm reading "Beyond the Grave: An Orthodox Theology of Eschatology" by Constantine Callinicos. So far it seems to be a very interesting read.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on August 21, 2009, 07:45:37 AM
Finished Life of Pi and am currently working on Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank.  Somehow I missed reading this in elementary school.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Douglas on August 21, 2009, 10:10:32 AM
I'm now reading: Man of God; the story of St John of Shanghai and San Francisco.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on August 22, 2009, 01:57:59 AM
Equity Happens by Robert Helms and Russell Gray

and

Rich Dad, Poor Dad Robert Kiyosaki

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on August 22, 2009, 01:59:02 AM
The Way of a pilgram

Wonderful, wonderful book.  Very inspiring...  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Catherine on August 25, 2009, 06:27:38 PM
The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century

Alex Ross's book about the development of classical music:

http://www.therestisnoise.com/2004/05/what_is_this.html
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on August 25, 2009, 06:35:06 PM
The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery

Absolutely fantastic! And I normally don't read best sellers as a rule.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on August 25, 2009, 06:48:25 PM
The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century

Alex Ross's book about the development of classical music:

http://www.therestisnoise.com/2004/05/what_is_this.html

How is it so far?  I was watching a documentary on Stravinsky and Copland earlier, and it was so interesting to see where their influences came from what how they influenced later music (especially Copland with the founding of an "American" sound).  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Marc1152 on August 25, 2009, 10:49:39 PM
I just ordered:

Old Believers in Modern Russia
by Roy Robson
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on August 25, 2009, 11:08:10 PM
Agincourt by Bernard Cornwell.   (http://www.amazon.com/Agincourt-Novel-Bernard-Cornwell/dp/0061578916)

Some may find him trite and formulaic, but I love his work. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: John of the North on August 30, 2009, 01:40:27 AM
I'm reading "Child 44" by Tom Rob Smith. I read alot of books, but this murder mystery set in the USSR has to be one of the best I have read...
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on August 30, 2009, 02:21:50 AM
I just picked up my four volumes of the Philokalia yesterday! I began by reading St. Mark the Ascetic's treatise on "No righteousness by Works." (From the 1st volume) Great stuff! Very readable, and yet each single text could be meditated on for a lifetime. I only hope that I will be able to make these rich spiritual teachings applicable to my daily life.

As St. Mark the Ascetic writes:

        "Philosophize through your works about man's will and God's retribution. For your words are only as wise and as profitable as your works." 

Pray for me.

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Αριστοκλής on August 30, 2009, 02:30:34 AM
The Russian Dagger - Cold War in the Days of the Czars - Virginia Cowles (Harper & Row, 1969)

Not in it far enough to comment further.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ortho_cat on September 04, 2009, 06:40:50 PM
"The Spiritual Life and How to be Attuned to it" by St. Theophan the Recluse
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Aidan on September 05, 2009, 01:55:02 PM
The Titles of Christ by Matthew the Poor
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Catherine on September 05, 2009, 03:31:40 PM
 

I am now reading two books:

The Epic Realm of Tolkien - Part One - Beren and Lúthien

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Epic-Realm-Tolkien-Luthien-Realms/dp/0955190037

and

Father Arseny, 1893-1973: Priest, Prisoner, Spiritual Father

http://www.amazon.com/Father-Arseny-1893-1973-Narratives-Concerning/dp/0881411809

http://www.orthodoxmarketplace.com/books-1-2/isbn-0881411809-vera-bouteneff-trans-father-arseny-1893-1973.html



Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on September 05, 2009, 04:24:36 PM
Defeating Sin by Fr. Joseph Honeycutt.

Hellenica by Xenophon.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Douglas on September 05, 2009, 07:58:05 PM
I'm completely Frank Schaeffer's triology: Portofino, Saving Grandma and now Zermat (the order in which they were written but not the proper chronological order). I've read Portofino (loved it) and Saving Grandma (hilarious) and now am about 3/4 of the way through Zermat (not the the faint-hearted and prudish, especially if sexual overtones and graphic details make you squeamish). I will say that the man can write a darned good novel.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on September 05, 2009, 11:11:00 PM
How To Read A Financial Report by John A. Tracy

Profit By Investing In Real Estate Tax Liens by Larry B. Loftis

What No One Ever Tells You About Investing In Real Estate by Robert J. Hill

Magic Bullets In Real Estate by Dan Auito

What can I say?  I majored in Partyology in college; now it's time to get down to bidness.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Bono Vox on September 06, 2009, 12:18:19 AM
"Compassion: A Reflection on the Christian Life" by Fr. Henri Nouwen

Although this is book was written by Roman Catholic priests, it is very good. I would highly recommend it to everyone.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: deusveritasest on September 06, 2009, 12:38:10 AM
Dune: The Butlerian Jihad by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on September 06, 2009, 12:57:05 AM
"Compassion: A Reflection on the Christian Life" by Fr. Henri Nouwen

Although this is book was written by Roman Catholic priests, it is very good. I would highly recommend it to everyone.

Fr. Henri Nouwen is a great author.  I have his The Return of the Prodigal Son.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on September 06, 2009, 04:14:54 AM
Your Inner Fish: A Journey Into the 3.5 Billion Year History of the Human Body, by Neil Shubin. A fascinating and entertaining read about the discovery of the Tiktaalik; the intermediate between fish and primitive land-living animal.

Some of the blurb from the back cover: Cleverly weaving together adventures in paleontology with very accessible science, Neil Shubin reveals the many surprisingly deep connections between our anatomy and that of fish, reptiles and other creatures. You will never look at your body in the same way again - examine, embrace, and exalt Your Inner Fish!

Also in the middle of reading the Sookie Stackhouse Southern Vampire series and finding it very entertaining.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on September 07, 2009, 11:08:19 AM
The ascent of Mount Carmel - St. John of the Cross
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on September 08, 2009, 05:08:01 AM
I just finished Nick Saban's book How Good Do You Want To Be?

Nick Saban is the head football coach at the University of Alabama. I thoroughly enjoyed the book. Nick Saban's book articulates philosophies and principles that are applicable to all walks of life and all professions.

One of his main points is focusing on the process rather than the result. He says that we cannot control the outcome, but we can control our effort, our attitude, our work ethic, and our mentality. The daily details that may seem insignificant are actually the things that determine the results and the outcome. Being faithful in marriage, being honest in the workplace, doing our best with what God has given us- these are the things that separate champions from the rest.

Regardless of whether or not you are an Alabama fan, this book will benefit you. I Promise!

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: mike on September 08, 2009, 05:56:36 AM
Making  money by T. Pratchett, I'm taking an advantage of the fact that I've got three weeks of holidays left and I can spent some time on reading before I go to a University and I start to study.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on September 08, 2009, 12:48:10 PM
"Compassion: A Reflection on the Christian Life" by Fr. Henri Nouwen

Although this is book was written by Roman Catholic priests, it is very good. I would highly recommend it to everyone.
A good friend has recommended his works to me.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Catherine on September 08, 2009, 05:46:15 PM
"Compassion: A Reflection on the Christian Life" by Fr. Henri Nouwen

Although this is book was written by Roman Catholic priests, it is very good. I would highly recommend it to everyone.
A good friend has recommended his works to me.

This sounds like a good read; it is definitely on my "must read" list.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Douglas on September 08, 2009, 09:18:47 PM
Currently reading The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Pilgrim on September 09, 2009, 12:33:18 AM
Shakedown: How our Government Is Undermining Democracy in the Name of Human Right by Ezra Levant. A look into the corruption and abuse by the kangaroo courts we call Human Rights Commissions. A book every Canadian must read. Did you know that the CHRC regularely poses as neo-Nazis on the internet, releasing private info from court cases? They have the power to take info from what should be classified info on criminals at police departments without judicial permission. On at least one proven occasion (by their own admission), they even hacked into a PRIVATE CITIZEN's computer, without warrent, using it to enter neo-nazi websites. This is unacceptable. We are long overdue for revolt in this country, and the time is now!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on September 09, 2009, 01:53:57 PM
Currently reading The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.
Saw the Movie. Fantastic and sad.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: mersch on September 09, 2009, 03:07:03 PM

The Apostolic Fathers, based on the text of the Loeb classical Library  (online edition)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Liz on September 09, 2009, 03:57:46 PM

The Apostolic Fathers, based on the text of the Loeb classical Library  (online edition)

There are online Loebs? That's great - how do you access them?

Thanks,

Liz.

(I am reading up on the battle of Heliopolis, and trying to nerve myself up to do some more serious study of Mary in the visual arts)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: mersch on September 09, 2009, 04:18:23 PM

The Apostolic Fathers, based on the text of the Loeb classical Library  (online edition)

There are online Loebs? That's great - how do you access them?

Thanks,

Liz.

(I am reading up on the battle of Heliopolis, and trying to nerve myself up to do some more serious study of Mary in the visual arts)

Found it at Christian Classics Ethereal Library    site is www.ccel.org           I have spent a lot of time reading various articles and other stuff here at this site.  I don't know if they have all the Loebs online at this site or not, but the one I'm currently reading is here.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: rwprof on September 09, 2009, 04:48:51 PM
Well, since buycotts are all the rage and there are all of these nuts boycotting Orson Scott Card, I picked up a copy of Ender's Game, which I haven't read since it came out (I also picked up a couple of novels by another author recommended to me, David Weber).

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ortho_cat on September 09, 2009, 09:20:18 PM
I'm reading Carlton's "The Faith" for a 2nd time.  This book is one of the most clear, interesting, and impactful catechisms written towards the western mind I've ever encountered.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on September 09, 2009, 09:41:35 PM
Bruce F. Katz's Neuroengineering the Future: Virtual Minds and the Creation of Immortality
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Pilgrim on September 09, 2009, 11:48:21 PM
That sounds interesting to say the least. What does he say about future immortality?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on September 09, 2009, 11:59:21 PM
That sounds interesting to say the least. What does he say about future immortality?

Not too far into it yet, but mostly focuses on immortality of the consciousness (also calls it our soul).  Advances in parallel computing could allow our consciousness to be free of the limitations of our organic brains, ushering in not only an age of exponentially increasing intelligence, creativity and memory retention but also a non-DNA-based immortality of humanity.  It is definitely interesting in light of Prof. Stephen Hawking's Life in the Universe lecture which discusses the possibility of mechanical lifeforms replacing DNA-based life.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on September 15, 2009, 02:40:43 PM
Gilgamesh and The Iliad for a class.  Next week it's The Odyssey
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on September 15, 2009, 06:46:39 PM
Utopia -Thomas More
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on September 15, 2009, 07:40:17 PM
That sounds interesting to say the least. What does he say about future immortality?

Not too far into it yet, but mostly focuses on immortality of the consciousness (also calls it our soul).  Advances in parallel computing could allow our consciousness to be free of the limitations of our organic brains, ushering in not only an age of exponentially increasing intelligence, creativity and memory retention but also a non-DNA-based immortality of humanity.  It is definitely interesting in light of Prof. Stephen Hawking's Life in the Universe lecture which discusses the possibility of mechanical lifeforms replacing DNA-based life.

This sounds absolutely frightening.  I hope I'm pushing up the daisy's when/if this ever comes about.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on September 15, 2009, 08:04:32 PM
Paternal Counsels, Volume 1 by Father Philotheos Zervakos

Touching Heaven:  Discovering Orthodox Christianity on the Island of Valaam by John Oliver
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on September 16, 2009, 12:03:27 AM
This sounds absolutely frightening.  I hope I'm pushing up the daisy's when/if this ever comes about.


Different strokes, I guess.  The sooner the better in my eyes.  ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on September 16, 2009, 12:47:28 PM
That sounds interesting to say the least. What does he say about future immortality?

Not too far into it yet, but mostly focuses on immortality of the consciousness (also calls it our soul).  Advances in parallel computing could allow our consciousness to be free of the limitations of our organic brains, ushering in not only an age of exponentially increasing intelligence, creativity and memory retention but also a non-DNA-based immortality of humanity.  It is definitely interesting in light of Prof. Stephen Hawking's Life in the Universe lecture which discusses the possibility of mechanical lifeforms replacing DNA-based life.
Nothing but Gnosticism; it won't work. The human brain and mind are not two separate things, and they cannot be divided. Besides, I've lost too many important files to computer crashes to trust my soul to Bill Gates.

That said, the Trekkie in me is desperately looking for a real-life Dr. Soong.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on September 16, 2009, 12:51:02 PM
"The Black Tower" by Louis Bayard (http://www.harpercollins.com/books/9780061173509/The_Black_Tower/index.aspx).  I thoroughly enjoyed "Mr. Timothy" (about a grown up Tiny Tim Cratchitt) and have just started this.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: EofK on September 16, 2009, 12:55:20 PM
Just finished The Diary of Anne Frank and Bill Bryson's Made in America.  I'm thinking of rereading Stephen King's Dark Tower series next, or perhaps check something new off of the classics list.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: zoarthegleaner on September 16, 2009, 03:46:03 PM
Democracy: The God that Failed: The Economics and Politics of Monarchy, Democracy, and Natural Order  by Hans-Hermann-Hoppe

A Lion Among Men is the third novel in Gregory Maguire's The Wicked Years Series about OZ

It's Superman! by Tom DeHaven (Just finished)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on September 16, 2009, 05:07:36 PM
Nothing but Gnosticism; it won't work. The human brain and mind are not two separate things, and they cannot be divided. Besides, I've lost too many important files to computer crashes to trust my soul to Bill Gates.

That said, the Trekkie in me is desperately looking for a real-life Dr. Soong.

I have to disagree.  The brain is just a squishy, slow parallel system shooting around its own version of 1s and 0s.  :P  It has served us well, but it needs an upgrade.  Just think, we can punish criminals by uploading them into a Windows system, or a Mac, I'm not exactly sure which would be worse.  ;D

I hope, in an homage to classic sci-fi, they will at least call any synthetic brain created, a positronic brain.  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on September 17, 2009, 06:41:57 AM
I hope, in an homage to classic sci-fi, they will at least call any synthetic brain created, a positronic brain.  :)
Doubt it. We didn't get the "communicator" but the "cellular phone"; we didn't get the "hypo spray" but the "dermal injection"; we didn't get the "dilithium nacelle" but the "antimatter rocket." So we'll probably have synthetic lifeforms, but the name will unfortunately not cater to sci-fi (note the correct spelling, Universal) fans.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Marat on September 17, 2009, 09:11:25 AM
I feel a little silly for asking this, since everyone seems to read higher quality books than this, but here goes nothing.

Has anyone read the "Sookie Stackhouse" books by Charlaine Harris? This is the series on which the show True Blood is based. I'm a fan of the show and I'm thinking about getting the books. I am particularly interested in reviews from anyone who has read them and watched the show. Books are always better, so I am anticipating this, but I understand there are some significant differences between the books and the show. I'm wondering how they compare.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on September 17, 2009, 09:38:41 AM
I feel a little silly for asking this, since everyone seems to read higher quality books than this, but here goes nothing.

Has anyone read the "Sookie Stackhouse" books by Charlaine Harris? This is the series on which the show True Blood is based. I'm a fan of the show and I'm thinking about getting the books. I am particularly interested in reviews from anyone who has read them and watched the show. Books are always better, so I am anticipating this, but I understand there are some significant differences between the books and the show. I'm wondering how they compare.

I haven't read them but my wife has.  She loves both the books and the television series.  She is normally a slow reader but she devours the novels in just a couple of days reading before we go to sleep. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: basilthefool on September 17, 2009, 10:00:24 AM
I just finished: A Guide to Orthodox Psychotherapy: The Science, Theology, and Spiritual Practice Behind It and Its Clinical Applications by Archbishop Chrysostomos. At the moment I'm starting Orthodox Psychotherapy by Metropolitan Hierotheos Vlachos.

In addition, I'm slowly reading volume one of the Evergetinos, the Spiritual Psalter of St Ephraim the Syrian (OK, this is more of a regular spiritual discipline for me since I first read it last year - now on my third go), and Out of Our Heads: Why You Are Not Your Brain, and Other Lessons from the Biology of Consciousness by Alva Noe (really just starting this one; received it as a gift!).

There are a couple of other books I'm considering to start on as well - I'm one of those people who seem to need to be reading several books at once, an unrecovered addiction from school days.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Marat on September 17, 2009, 10:02:10 AM
I feel a little silly for asking this, since everyone seems to read higher quality books than this, but here goes nothing.

Has anyone read the "Sookie Stackhouse" books by Charlaine Harris? This is the series on which the show True Blood is based. I'm a fan of the show and I'm thinking about getting the books. I am particularly interested in reviews from anyone who has read them and watched the show. Books are always better, so I am anticipating this, but I understand there are some significant differences between the books and the show. I'm wondering how they compare.

I haven't read them but my wife has.  She loves both the books and the television series.  She is normally a slow reader but she devours the novels in just a couple of days reading before we go to sleep. 

Thanks for responding. I'm glad to hear someone who loves the show enjoys the books so much. Reading them right before bed could lead to some unusual dreams.  :D I think I'm going to have to get them. Now that the season is over, I need some way to get my fix.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on September 17, 2009, 10:11:40 AM
Your local library should have them, so go try out the first one and you won't be out $6 or so if you find out you don't like them :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Marat on September 17, 2009, 10:13:30 AM
Your local library should have them, so go try out the first one and you won't be out $6 or so if you find out you don't like them :)

I was going to but they don't have the very first one. It's been stolen or something. The same thing happened at the university library too.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jetavan on September 17, 2009, 11:01:10 AM
Dan Brown, The Lost Symbol. Actually, I read it last night -- only took about 15 minutes. ::)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: StGeorge on September 18, 2009, 09:08:26 PM
I just finished St. Athanasios' On the Incarnation.  I've been reading some modern poetry from anthologies I used during my undergrad days.  Marianne Moore, Gertrude Stein, Hart Crane, etc.  I'm still trudging through Moby Dick.  At about 300 of 600 pages.  It may take me as long as an actual whaling voyage.   I received in the mail and have started reading William Blatty's The Exorcist.  I also received in the mail Jesuit Saints and Martyrs, and I've been reading selections from there. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on September 18, 2009, 09:33:45 PM
I feel a little silly for asking this, since everyone seems to read higher quality books than this, but here goes nothing.

Has anyone read the "Sookie Stackhouse" books by Charlaine Harris? This is the series on which the show True Blood is based. I'm a fan of the show and I'm thinking about getting the books. I am particularly interested in reviews from anyone who has read them and watched the show. Books are always better, so I am anticipating this, but I understand there are some significant differences between the books and the show. I'm wondering how they compare.

I love the books and consider them far superior to the TV series, which I have also enjoyed watching. The fact is, though, on ocassion I have wondered if the TV series is actually based on the Stackhouse books, at all. ;) Get the books; you won't be disappointed.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on September 24, 2009, 01:47:40 AM
Johannes Scotus Eriugena's De divisione naturae
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on October 05, 2009, 01:21:50 AM
King Rat by James Clavell
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on October 05, 2009, 08:36:40 AM
"The City and The Pillar," by Gore Vidal. Very powerful story, somewhat autobiographical, about growing up gay in the 1930-s - 1940-s.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: TinaG on October 05, 2009, 08:57:45 AM
The Selected Works of T.S. Spivet by Reif Larsen.  Excellent & quirky - every page is illustrated by hand drawings, odd diagrams and quirky maps.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Elisha on October 05, 2009, 09:37:38 AM
"Orthodoxy" by Chesterton
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on October 05, 2009, 01:37:21 PM
"Orthodoxy" by Chesterton
One of my all time favorites.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: John Larocque on October 05, 2009, 02:50:46 PM
Nearly done Lossky's "Mystical theology of the Eastern Church". It appears I ordered one of the last copies, as SVS press no longer lists the title in its online catalog. I had to read a couple of chapters twice but am near the end. The subject matter is difficult but not impossible, and my Zen and Buddhist readings from a few years ago already gave me a healthy introduction into the "apophatic" headspace.

Also ordered and just started Olivier Clement's "Roots of Christian Mysticism," which includes some several Western fathers as well, and a biography of each father at the back.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: livefreeordie on October 05, 2009, 02:59:21 PM
Robert Penn Warren's - "Wilderness:A Tale of the Civil War".  We graduated from the same school and I've always wanted to read more of him. It's pretty good so far.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on October 05, 2009, 03:13:29 PM
(http://www.bookfind.co.nz/staging/the_desert_fathers_sayings_of_the_early_christian_monks_penguin_classics-img-0140447318.jpg)

The Desert Fathers: Sayings of the Early Christian Monks (Penguin Classics), translated from the Latin by Benedicta Ward.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on October 05, 2009, 08:42:14 PM
(http://www.bookfind.co.nz/staging/the_desert_fathers_sayings_of_the_early_christian_monks_penguin_classics-img-0140447318.jpg)

The Desert Fathers: Sayings of the Early Christian Monks (Penguin Classics), translated from the Latin by Benedicta Ward.

Cool. I love that cover!

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on October 05, 2009, 10:17:04 PM

The Desert Fathers: Sayings of the Early Christian Monks (Penguin Classics), translated from the Latin by Benedicta Ward.

Great book!  I've enjoyed it for years.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on October 05, 2009, 10:30:23 PM
Cool. I love that cover!

You should read it.  Being Oriental Orthodox, it should have a special place in your heart, as it represents Egyptian monasticism and the traditions of Alexandrian Christianity that helped to form the Ethiopian church's identity.  This collection of writings continues to inspire monks East and West in all communions.  It is powerful stuff.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on October 05, 2009, 11:03:05 PM
Sailing from Byzantium by Colin Wells.

The Roman Empire by Colin Wells.

Living Tradition by +Fr. John Meyendorff.

The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on October 05, 2009, 11:03:35 PM
Cool. I love that cover!

You should read it.  Being Oriental Orthodox, it should have a special place in your heart, as it represents Egyptian monasticism and the traditions of Alexandrian Christianity that helped to form the Ethiopian church's identity.  This collection of writings continues to inspire monks East and West in all communions.  It is powerful stuff.

I'll get try to get it soon.

I recently got my four volumes of the Philokalia, and have begun reading through it. Will the book you mention be superfluous in relation to the Philokalia, or does it contain totally different material from different Fathers?

Forgive my ignorance.

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on October 05, 2009, 11:09:06 PM
Will the book you mention be superfluous in relation to the Philokalia, or does it contain totally different material from different Fathers?

Partially.  I doubt all of the material contained in this book will be in the Philokalia, but a good portion of it probably will be.  You might as well skip this book.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on October 05, 2009, 11:12:51 PM
Financial Reports for Dummies. by Lita Epstein

 Good grief!  I'd rather watch paint dry y'all...  :-\
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on October 05, 2009, 11:14:29 PM
Euclid's Elements.

Surprisingly enough, this is this first time I am going through the actual thing.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on October 06, 2009, 12:51:59 AM
Will the book you mention be superfluous in relation to the Philokalia, or does it contain totally different material from different Fathers?

Partially.  I doubt all of the material contained in this book will be in the Philokalia, but a good portion of it probably will be.  You might as well skip this book.

I may get it anyway. If nothng else, I love that cover! Who is the Saint pictured on the front? Is that St. Antony?

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on October 06, 2009, 01:47:46 AM
Yes, it is.  A Hippocentaur is showing him the way to St. Paul the Hermit.

How are we moderns (post-moderns?!? ;) ) meant to understand the mythological creatures appearing in these stories, anyway?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on October 06, 2009, 01:59:44 AM
Yes, it is.  A Hippocentaur is showing him the way to St. Paul the Hermit.

How are we moderns (post-moderns?!? ;) ) meant to understand the mythological creatures appearing in these stories, anyway?

Wow. I thought it might be a picture of St. Antony reading the Scriptures in the presence of some demonic creature. I know from Athanasius' Life of Antony that he encountered all manner of demonic visions- hideous creatures as well as angelic-looking beings. But St. Antony never listened to any of them, because he knew they were all from the devil. So I doubt if he would have listened to a "hippocentaur." But I could be wrong. What do you tihink?

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on October 06, 2009, 02:35:29 AM
All I have is a reference to the incident in the introduction to the work; I have no additional context outside of this quote:

"He caught sight of a creature who was half man and half horse, to which the poets have given the name of Hippocentaur.  At the sight of it he protected himself by making the life-giving sign on his own forehead, and said, 'Hey you, where does the servant of God live?  The creature...indicated a desire for friendly communication.  Stretching out his right hand he indicated the route that Anthony was seeking" (Desert Fathers, p. xii).

So it seems that he took some caution initially in case it was an evil apparition, but ultimately he ended up being a friendly character.  This sort of thing just seems outright bizarre to a modern mind, although I suppose the postmodern mind can do some fun things with it.  Either way, I was wondering if the meaning of the character is more plain than simple plot development.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on October 06, 2009, 02:45:58 AM
All I have is a reference to the incident in the introduction to the work; I have no additional context outside of this quote:

"He caught sight of a creature who was half man and half horse, to which the poets have given the name of Hippocentaur.  At the sight of it he protected himself by making the life-giving sign on his own forehead, and said, 'Hey you, where does the servant of God live?  The creature...indicated a desire for friendly communication.  Stretching out his right hand he indicated the route that Anthony was seeking" (Desert Fathers, p. xii).

So it seems that he took some caution initially in case it was an evil apparition, but ultimately he ended up being a friendly character.  This sort of thing just seems outright bizarre to a modern mind, although I suppose the postmodern mind can do some fun things with it.  Either way, I was wondering if the meaning of the character is more plain than simple plot development.

Very interesting indeed. I'd love to know more about this story. It must have been a vision, since "hippocentaurs" could not have been actual physical creatures of this earthly realm.

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on October 06, 2009, 03:17:19 AM
Yes, it is.  A Hippocentaur is showing him the way to St. Paul the Hermit.

How are we moderns (post-moderns?!? ;) ) meant to understand the mythological creatures appearing in these stories, anyway?

Way ahead of ya'.  :)

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,12689.0.html
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on October 06, 2009, 03:33:43 AM
Yes, it is.  A Hippocentaur is showing him the way to St. Paul the Hermit.

How are we moderns (post-moderns?!? ;) ) meant to understand the mythological creatures appearing in these stories, anyway?

Way ahead of ya'.  :)

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,12689.0.html

OK, here are my uneducated thoughts on this subject. I believe that theoretically unicorns, dragons, and the leviathon could have actually existed. But these half man half horse "centaur" creatures seem to violate the biblical account of Creation. Humans were created specifically and uniquely in the image of God, and thus there can be no such thing as a partial human. But unicorns, dragons, and leviathon do not do violence to the Creation account, nor do they undermine the sanctity of human life.

What do you think?

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Irish Hermit on October 06, 2009, 08:07:27 AM
Johannes Scotus Eriugena's De divisione naturae

An Orthodox Evaluation of Certain Teachings in the Writings
of John Scotus Eriugena
in Light of the Theology of St Gregory Palamas

by Deacon Geoffrey Ready


http://web.archive.org/web/20031210140924/http://www.nireland.com/orthodox/eriugena.htm

He makes a pathetic and not undignified figure, this eager, slightly-built Irishman,
with his subtle mind, his studious habits, his deeply reverent spirit,
his almost fanatical devotion to the wise men of former days,
Pagan or Christian, who had lived in the light of a wider civilisation:
called upon to fight the battles of the West with arms forged in the East,
and reprimanded even in the hour of conquest for having transgressed the rules of the field.

Alice Gardner, Studies in John the Scot.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

He deviated from the path of the Latins
while he kept his eyes intently fixed on the Greeks;
wherefore he was reputed an heretic.

William of Malmesbury, de Pontificibus.

John Scotus Eriugena stands as a remarkable figure in the spiritual history of the Christian West. His native Ireland was insula sanctorum — the "Isle of the Saints," where Orthodox Christianity, planted by Saint Pádraig in the fifth century, had taken such root that it had created an entire monastic culture and produced countless thousands of glorified saints. By the ninth century, however, the Apostolic and Patristic Tradition of glorification which had transformed Ireland was coming under an attack which would ultimately prove more devastating than those of the Vikings who were by now violently raiding monastic settlements along the Irish coasts.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on October 06, 2009, 10:28:17 PM
Edgar Allan Poe's Eureka: A Prose Poem
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on October 09, 2009, 10:05:11 PM
The Dawkins Delusion: Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial of the Divine by McGrath and McGrath
God and the New Atheism: A Critical Response to Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens by John F. Haught
God: The Failed Hypothesis, How Science Shows that God Does Not Exist by Victor J. Stenger

The first two were rather interesting reads, though the third one has been sort of dry so far (and has a foreward by Hitchens, who I'm not a big fan of).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Justinian on October 09, 2009, 11:15:48 PM
The Dawkins Delusion: Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial of the Divine by McGrath and McGrath
God and the New Atheism: A Critical Response to Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens by John F. Haught
God: The Failed Hypothesis, How Science Shows that God Does Not Exist by Victor J. Stenger

The first two were rather interesting reads, though the third one has been sort of dry so far (and has a foreward by Hitchens, who I'm not a big fan of).

You should try Athiest Delusions: The Christian Revolution and its Fashionable Enemies, published by Yale University Press by (a Orthodox theologian no less!) David Bentley Hart. It takes on the Hitchens, Dawkins, Harris, etc. and also gives a very enlightening and fresh look at Christian History.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on October 09, 2009, 11:43:38 PM
Thanks for the recommendation, I moved that book towards the top of my list of books to buy. I was amazed at how many books had been published lately refuting Dawkins, Hitchens, Dennett, and Harris. I have over 25 on my list of potential books to get on this topic... I have no intention of reading all of them, but I still don't know which ones will make the cut...

Quote
[BOUGHT]The Dawkins Delusion?: Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial of the Divine - McGrath and Mcgrath
[BOUGHT]God and the New Atheism: A Critical Response to Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens - Haught
Atheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and Its Fashionable Enemies - David Bentley Hart
The New Atheist Crusaders and Their Unholy Grail: The Misguided Quest to Destroy Your Faith - Garrison
The Truth Behind the New Atheism: Responding to the Emerging Challenges to God and Christianity - David Marshall
Answering the New Atheism: Dismantling Dawkins' Case Against God - Hahn and Wiker
The New Atheists: The Twilight of Reason and the War on Religion - Beattie
Atheism Remix: A Christian Confronts the New Atheists - Albert Mohler Jr.
The Last Superstition: A Refutation of the New Atheism - Edward Feser
When Atheism Becomes Religion: America's New Fundamentalists - Chris Hedges
Dawkins' Dilemmas - Michael Austin
The Deluded Athist: A Response to Richard Dawkins -  Douglas Wilson
Why There Almost Certainly Is a God - Keith Ward
Is God a Delusion? A Reply to Religion's Cultured Despisers - Eric Reitan
The Devil's Delusion - David Berlinski
God, Doubt, and Dawkins: Reform Rabbis Respond to the God Delusion - Jonathan Romain
Deluded by Dawkins? - Andrew Wilson
The Irrational Atheist: Dessecting the Unholy Trinity of Dawkins, harris, and Hitches - Vox Day
Darwin's Angel - John Cornwell
The End of Reason: A Response to the New Atheists - Zacharias and Strobel
The Delusion of Disbelief: Why the New Atheism is a Threat to Your Life, Liberty, and Pursuit of Happiness - Aikman
God is No Delusion: A Refutation of Richard Dawkins - Crean
The Atheist Delusion - Fernandes
The Devil's Delusion: Atheism and Its Scientific Pretensions - Berlinski
Letter to a Christian Nation: Counter Point - Metcalf
Letter from a Christian Citizen - A Response to "Letter to a Christian Nation" - Wilson
Letter to an Atheist - Leahy
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on October 09, 2009, 11:57:34 PM
The Dawkins Delusion: Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial of the Divine by McGrath and McGrath
God and the New Atheism: A Critical Response to Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens by John F. Haught
God: The Failed Hypothesis, How Science Shows that God Does Not Exist by Victor J. Stenger

The first two were rather interesting reads, though the third one has been sort of dry so far (and has a foreward by Hitchens, who I'm not a big fan of).

I reserved the Dawkins Delusion at the library and await its arrival. Since our new house project, I've had to curtail the book buying.  :'(
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on October 10, 2009, 12:05:53 AM
I tend to stay away from books on religion that include "Delusion" in the title.  Whether they are from a Christian or Atheist view, I find they tend to have weak arguments, are painfully drawn out, and end up making the "other side" look better.  :P
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on October 10, 2009, 12:16:23 AM
I tend to stay away from books on religion that include "Delusion" in the title.  Whether they are from a Christian or Atheist view, I find they tend to have weak arguments, are painfully drawn out, and end up making the "other side" look better.  :P


:laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on October 10, 2009, 12:30:29 AM
Honestly, I have never been a fan of Dawkins, but after reading McGrath's book...  he became that much more bearable.

Currently reading:  Scott Adams' God's Debris: A Thought Experiment
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Douglas on October 10, 2009, 12:43:49 AM
Currently reading: Planet Google: One Company's Audacious Plan To Organize Everything We Know by Randall Stross. It's a frightening and eye-opening look at a company with massive ambitions.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on October 16, 2009, 06:31:30 PM
Just finished the Popul Vuh for a class.  Fascinating.  The week before was The Death of the King's Horseman a play by Wole Soyinka.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on October 16, 2009, 06:49:00 PM
Thirsting for God in a Land of Shallow Wells  by Matthew Gallatin

It's very good so far.

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on October 16, 2009, 08:50:36 PM
Jack Cohen and Ian Stewart's What Does a Martian Look Like? The Science of Extraterrestrial Life
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on October 16, 2009, 08:54:07 PM
Christianity and Classical Culture: The Metamorphosis of Natural Theology in the Christian Encounter with Hellenism, by Jaroslav Pelikan
The Art of Prayer: An Orthodox Anthology, compiled by Igumen Chariton of Valamo
Godless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists, by Dan Barker
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jetavan on October 17, 2009, 10:43:15 AM
Thank God for Evolution (http://www.amazon.com/Thank-God-Evolution-Marriage-Transform/dp/0452295343/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1255790562&sr=8-1), by Michael Dowd
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on October 17, 2009, 06:45:30 PM
Thank God for Evolution (http://www.amazon.com/Thank-God-Evolution-Marriage-Transform/dp/0452295343/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1255790562&sr=8-1), by Michael Dowd

Oh, that does look interesting! How's it going?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Sakeneko on October 17, 2009, 08:31:06 PM
"The Black Hole War", by Leonard Susskind

An engagingly written book about a major development in the physics of black holes in the past twenty years.  If you're a scientist, this will be light but enjoyable reading.  If you're not, you may struggle to follow some of the equations, but the math is reasonably light and well explained for a general audience. Susskind, unlike many top scientists, is able to communicate with those who aren't as bright as he is to the benefit of both. ;-)

"Sphinx's Princess", by Esther Friesner

A young adult level fictionalized "autobiography" of the adolescent Nefertiti.  So far this has been rather well done.  Friesner did her homework, so there's a realistic base to this essentially romantic story, and it is leavened by flashes of humor.  (As anybody familiar with Friesner's earlier work would have expected -- she's one of the best living writers of science fiction and fantasy humor.)  I'm reading this before giving a couple of copies to nieces and goddaughters for Christmas. :-)

By the way, *any* collection of the sayings of the Desert Fathers translated by Sr. Benedicta Ward is worth having and reading over and over again.  I reread mine during Lent every year.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jetavan on October 18, 2009, 09:22:13 AM
Thank God for Evolution (http://www.amazon.com/Thank-God-Evolution-Marriage-Transform/dp/0452295343/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1255790562&sr=8-1), by Michael Dowd

Oh, that does look interesting! How's it going?
It's a fascinating attempt to see evolution as a 'sacred' process. He draws heavily on the work of Thomas Berry, Catholic philosopher, who wrote:

Quote
The basic mood (http://www.thomasberry.org/Biography/) of the future might well be one of confidence in the continuing revelation that takes place in and through the Earth. If the dynamics of the Universe from the beginning shaped the course of the heavens, lighted the sun, and formed the Earth, if this same dynamism brought forth the continents and the seas and atmosphere, if it awakened life in the primordial cell and then brought into being the unnumbered variety of living beings, and finally brought us into being and guided us safely through the turbulent centuries, there is reason to believe that this same guiding process is precisely what has awakened in us our present understanding of ourselves and our relation to this stupendous process. Sensitized to such guidance from the very structure and functioning of the Universe, we can have confidence in the future that awaits the human venture.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on October 18, 2009, 06:43:06 PM
^Oh yes, that does look interesting . Added the book to my wishlist.  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: John Larocque on October 23, 2009, 01:12:41 AM
Just got:
"Eucharist, Bishop, Church" by John D. Zizioulas (+John of Pergamon)

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on October 23, 2009, 07:24:59 AM
I never thought I would say this but I am reading way too much. I don't think my brain can take much more!  Titles for this week. I'm back on a Runciman kick.

The Byzantine Theocracy
by Sir Steven Runciman
The Sicilian Vespers by Sir Steven Runciman
The Great Church in Captivity by Sir Steven Runciman
The Eastern Schism by Sir Steven Runciman
The Economics of the Tax Revolt, ed. Arthur Laffer and Jan Seymour
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on October 25, 2009, 12:43:53 AM
Who Wrote the New Testament?: The Making of the Christian Myth, by Burton L. Mack. I've just started this book  (I'm about 33 pages in). As one might expect from the sub-title, this book tends towards more non-traditional views, such as dating certain New Testament works into the 2nd century. It was because I began reading this book that I started the thread about dating NT books, as I was curious as to what people here thought. The basic premise of the book seems to be that many of the books of the New Testament were a part of disparite traditions, and that these books were only later harmonized with each other so as to make them seem like they were all saying the same thing.

The Existence of God: From Plato to A.J. Ayer On the Question "Does God Exist?", ed. by John Hick. I read some of this book before, but lost interest in it, so now I'm going to try and start from the beginning and read it again. It's been a few years since I actually read arguments for and against God, so I figured it was time for a refresher, even if this book is a bit old (1964)and some of the argumentation will have changed since it was written.

The Desert A City, by Derwas J. Chitty. I read this back when I first became interested in Orthodoxy about about 8 1/2 years ago, and I think I was still a catechumen at the time. I remember really enjoying the book, so I bought it last Christmas, but I never got around to reading it until now. The book is about Christian monasticism in the 4th-7th centuries.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on October 25, 2009, 01:34:18 AM
I never thought I would say this but I am reading way too much. I don't think my brain can take much more!  Titles for this week. I'm back on a Runciman kick.

The Byzantine Theocracy
by Sir Steven Runciman
The Sicilian Vespers by Sir Steven Runciman
The Great Church in Captivity by Sir Steven Runciman
The Eastern Schism by Sir Steven Runciman
The Economics of the Tax Revolt, ed. Arthur Laffer and Jan Seymour

I love Sir Steven!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on October 25, 2009, 05:00:46 PM
I've also added volume 3 of John Julius Norwich's Byzantium for some additional information while reading Runicman's various works.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: StGeorge on October 27, 2009, 08:11:37 PM
I'm 70 pages into The Brothers Karamazov.  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on October 27, 2009, 08:15:28 PM
Quote
I'm 70 pages into The Brothers Karamazov

What do you think of it so far? I couldn't really get into it, which is kinda odd considering Crime and Punishment and Notes From Underground are two of my favorite fictional works.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on October 27, 2009, 08:23:32 PM
Dr. Richard Dawkins' The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: StGeorge on October 27, 2009, 08:26:42 PM
Quote
I'm 70 pages into The Brothers Karamazov

What do you think of it so far? I couldn't really get into it, which is kinda odd considering Crime and Punishment and Notes From Underground are two of my favorite fictional works.

I read Crime and Punishment two summers ago and really liked it.  When I later read Notes from the Underground, I did not enjoy reading it, although I attempted to see its literary value. 

The first chapter or two of The Brothers Karamazov was a bit difficult to get through (all the names and inter-relations), but since mapping the characters out, the past few chapters have been good.  I still have 640 pages to go.   

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: StGeorge on October 27, 2009, 08:29:22 PM
Dr. Richard Dawkins' The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution

So, where are the clowns?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on October 27, 2009, 08:46:11 PM
Dr. Richard Dawkins' The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution

So, where are the clowns?

In the universities?  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on October 27, 2009, 09:06:46 PM
Dr. Richard Dawkins' The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution

So, where are the clowns?

In the universities?  :)

On the streets, in stores, houses, etc. :P

Honestly, it has been pretty good so far.  Witty and arrogant as always.  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on October 27, 2009, 11:28:57 PM
Quote
I'm 70 pages into The Brothers Karamazov

What do you think of it so far? I couldn't really get into it, which is kinda odd considering Crime and Punishment and Notes From Underground are two of my favorite fictional works.

I read Crime and Punishment two summers ago and really liked it.  When I later read Notes from the Underground, I did not enjoy reading it, although I attempted to see its literary value. 

The first chapter or two of The Brothers Karamazov was a bit difficult to get through (all the names and inter-relations), but since mapping the characters out, the past few chapters have been good.  I still have 640 pages to go.   



Great book!

Yeah, once you get the names and characters memorized it becomes very readable.

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on October 28, 2009, 09:49:52 AM
I'm 70 pages into The Brothers Karamazov.  :)
That's about where I am in the book but I'm moving slow becasue I am so busy right now.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: StGeorge on October 29, 2009, 08:19:30 PM
I'm 70 pages into The Brothers Karamazov.  :)
That's about where I am in the book but I'm moving slow becasue I am so busy right now.

I just finished the family meeting with the elder.  Aloysha is pondering the elder's enigmatic prostration before Dimitri. 
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: frstephenlourie on October 30, 2009, 02:00:14 PM
I just finished "The Visionary". Quite enthralling Orthodox fiction. Available at Amazon.
http://www.amazon.com/Visionary-Michael-Hallford/dp/0979160065[url]

The author is a priest at the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of Saint Markella in New York

Recommended highly.

Fr. Stephen Lourie
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Oleg Anishchenkov on October 30, 2009, 02:17:33 PM
"Orthodoxy" by G. K. Chesterton.

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/130
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aserb on November 03, 2009, 11:08:35 AM
Romanov Bride. fiction based on fact the story of St. Elizabeth the New Martyr
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on November 03, 2009, 11:23:13 AM
"Orthodoxy" by G. K. Chesterton.

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/130
One of my all time favorites.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Schultz on November 03, 2009, 11:40:02 AM
I just finished White Corridor by Christopher Fowler (http://www.amazon.com/White-Corridor-Peculiar-Mystery-Mysteries/dp/055358832X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1257262620&sr=8-1).  If you like odd mystery/detective stories, the author's "Peculiar Crimes Unit Mystery" series are for you.

I'm about 1/4 of the way into The Hangman's Hymn by P.C. Doherty (http://www.amazon.com/Hangmans-Hymn-Carpenters-Pilgrimage-Canterbury/dp/0312300905/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1257262690&sr=1-1), which is part of the author's "Canterbury Mysteries," telling the stories that Chaucer didn't collect in the latter's magnum opus
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on November 03, 2009, 12:24:54 PM
The One and the Many; A Contemporary Thomistic Metaphysics
                                                        - W. Norris Clarke, S.J.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Oleg Anishchenkov on November 03, 2009, 12:48:03 PM
[quote
"Orthodoxy" by G. K. Chesterton.

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/130
[/quote]
One of my all time favorites.
[/quote]

Since not all people who heard about this book have found time to read it could you write in brief what this book is about?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on November 03, 2009, 12:53:12 PM
An old one:  N.B. Baynes, "Constantine the Great and the  Christian Church" from 1930!

Gospel according to Matthew in Greek.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on November 03, 2009, 12:58:07 PM
[quote
"Orthodoxy" by G. K. Chesterton.

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/130
One of my all time favorites.
[/quote]

Since not all people who heard about this book have found time to read it could you write in brief what this book is about?
[/quote]
Its bascially G.K. Chesterton's work on describing why he is a Christian and not a rationalist. I wouldn't do him justice so I highly suggest everyone take glance at it.

http://books.google.com/books?id=GT_GpVcKfywC&dq=G.K.+Chesterton+Orthodoxy&printsec=frontcover&source=bl&ots=1iigZQaTZN&sig=rwEC-Yw1B1VrOPNP1fMKAU1fx-U&hl=en&ei=u2DwSv7PKsWWtges3bn1Bw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CBEQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=&f=false (http://books.google.com/books?id=GT_GpVcKfywC&dq=G.K.+Chesterton+Orthodoxy&printsec=frontcover&source=bl&ots=1iigZQaTZN&sig=rwEC-Yw1B1VrOPNP1fMKAU1fx-U&hl=en&ei=u2DwSv7PKsWWtges3bn1Bw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CBEQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=&f=false)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Oleg Anishchenkov on November 03, 2009, 01:57:32 PM
Tank you for your comment and the website.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on November 03, 2009, 01:59:59 PM
Tank you for your comment and the website.
You're welcome.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Feanor on November 03, 2009, 09:17:20 PM
I'm 70 pages into The Brothers Karamazov.  :)

Awesome. That's my all-time favourite book.


I'm currently reading The Road by Cormac McCarthy... it's incredible.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on November 06, 2009, 09:07:20 PM
Critique of Religion and Philosophy, by Walter Kaufmann. I'm only about 20 pages into this one, though I have leafed through the rest of the book to see what I was getting into. The book seems to be a hodge-podge of reflections by Kaufmann on all things religious. I wasn't really eager to start this one, but it's been sitting on my bookshelf for a couple years, and I figured I might as well give it a shot.

The Six Ways of Atheism: New Logical Disproofs of the Existence of God, by Geoffrey Berg. Got this one from the local public library. This book seems to be about the main evidences that atheists put forth to disprove the existence of God, only (so far as I can tell) Berg constructs the arguments in less philosophical language, so that the book is a bit more accessible than such books usually are.

Western Atheism: A Short History, by James Thrower. Also got this one from the library, and it's the second time I've read it. I needed it again to get some leads on who to look to as far as early agnosticism, particular in ancient Greece. It's a fun, short read, though it gets a tad boring in the middle ages when the author is talking about pantheists and such.

The Varieites of Scientific Experience: A Personal view of the Search for God, by Carl Sagan. Just started this one, and have only read the editor's introduction. Seems like it'll be a good one, though.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Feanor on November 06, 2009, 11:23:07 PM
The nun at the church I've started going to gave me a copy of The Way of the Pilgrim. I'm loving it so far.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on November 12, 2009, 05:12:48 AM
I just recently started a book titled Deism: A Revolution in Religion, A Revolution in You by Bob Johnson, and it's a hoot. It starts with the sensationalistic line: "The power of Deism can be yours!" And the fun doesn't end there. Apparently this "revolutionary" view of God can solve many of our individual and societal problems. Funny thing, though, rather than using the 100 pages in the book to build a case for Deism and it's potential benefits, the author instead spends the majority of the book attacking "revealed religions" and neocons. And he keeps putting words like revealed in quotes for no apparent reason. For example, here is a statement from page 63:

Quote
One way Deism can neutralize the deadly power that the "revealed" religions hold is to educate the world about the Bible's ungodly origins.

Btw, if you're wondering, the Bible has "ungodly origins" because, according to the author, the Emperor Constantine decided what the canon of the New Testament should be. ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: aserb on November 12, 2009, 09:00:48 AM
The Romanov Bride. by Robert Alexander. Story of St. Elizabeth the New Martyr. Fascinating and compelling. It made me cry.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on November 12, 2009, 12:36:42 PM
Out of the Silent Planet, C.S. Lewis.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on November 12, 2009, 01:06:55 PM
Out of the Silent Planet, C.S. Lewis.
Another of my favorite books. I hope you get to read the entire trilogy. If you get to the last book, That Hideous Strenghth, be sure to read Lewis's essay, The Abolition of Man, along with it.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jetavan on November 12, 2009, 02:58:06 PM
The Great Work (http://www.amazon.com/Great-Work-Our-into-Future/dp/0609804995/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1258052210&sr=8-1), by Thomas Berry.

Quote
The future can exist only if humans understand how to commune with the natural world rather than exploit it, explains author and renowned ecologist Thomas Berry (The Dream of the Earth, The Universe Story). "Already the planet is so damaged and the future is so challenged by its rising human population that the terms of survival will be severe beyond anything we have known in the past."

This may make him sound like a scolding, doomsday prophet, but Berry is an optimistic soul, hopeful that humans will rise to the challenge of cherishing the natural world in the third millennium. "Our future destiny rests even more decisively on our capacity for intimacy in our human-Earth relations." Berry predicts. From this premise, Berry reveals why we need to adore our blessed planet, while also examining why we are culturally driven toward exploiting nature. Because Berry has a science background as well as a spiritual orientation (he is the founder of the History of Religions Program at Fordham University), he brings a balanced and fresh voice to social ecology. Even though he writes for the masses, Berry is by no means a lightweight--chapters include "Ecological Geography," "The Extractive Economy," "The Corporation Story," and "Reinventing the Human."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jetavan on November 12, 2009, 02:59:59 PM
I just recently started a book titled Deism: A Revolution in Religion, A Revolution in You by Bob Johnson, and it's a hoot. It starts with the sensationalistic line: "The power of Deism can be yours!" And the fun doesn't end there. Apparently this "revolutionary" view of God can solve many of our individual and societal problems. Funny thing, though, rather than using the 100 pages in the book to build a case for Deism and it's potential benefits, the author instead spends the majority of the book attacking "revealed religions" and neocons. And he keeps putting words like revealed in quotes for no apparent reason. For example, here is a statement from page 63:

Quote
One way Deism can neutralize the deadly power that the "revealed" religions hold is to educate the world about the Bible's ungodly origins.

Btw, if you're wondering, the Bible has "ungodly origins" because, according to the author, the Emperor Constantine decided what the canon of the New Testament should be. ;D
I prefer "Revealed Deism".
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jetavan on November 12, 2009, 03:03:04 PM
Dr. Richard Dawkins' The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution
He originally wanted to name it "The Only Game in Town".
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: mersch on November 12, 2009, 03:53:53 PM
The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom,  Wow.  Didn't realize till about page 60  that I had heard her speak many many many moons ago through Focus on the Family!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Super Apostolic Bros. on November 12, 2009, 04:25:15 PM
I am reading the replies of this forum.

In my spare time I'm reading Metropolitan Kallistos' The Orthodox Church.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on November 12, 2009, 04:54:33 PM
I am reading the replies of this forum.

In my spare time I'm reading Metropolitan Kallistos' The Orthodox Church.
Another book I have quite enjoyed. I pick it up and re-read portions of it from time to time.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Vlad on November 13, 2009, 12:56:15 AM
The Life of Alfred the Great

The Life of Christ by Fulton Sheen

The Soul After Death Seraphim Rose

I read a little of each in the tub and before bed.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Andrew21091 on November 13, 2009, 12:23:21 PM
I've recently just started reading Father Arseny which I have been meaning to do for some time since it has been recommended to me on many occasions.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on November 13, 2009, 01:58:15 PM
The Alexiad by Anna Comnena
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on November 13, 2009, 02:40:13 PM
The Life of Alfred the Great

The Life of Christ by Fulton Sheen

The Soul After Death Seraphim Rose

I read a little of each in the tub and before bed.
How is the Fulton Sheen book? I toy with the idea of reading if from time to time.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on November 13, 2009, 03:09:13 PM
Vita Patrum: The Life of the Fathers by St. Gregory of Tours
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Ebor on November 14, 2009, 02:03:01 PM
A history of the Library of Congress (I'll have to dig up the title and author)

Free to All: Carnagie Libraries and American Culture 1890-1920 by Van Slyck

The Feudal Kingdom of England 1042-1216 by Frank Barlow

Turn Coat the latest "Harry Dresden" adventure by Jim Butcher
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Heorhij on November 14, 2009, 06:42:10 PM
Even though it's the end of the semester and a crazy time, I started to read John Fowles's "The French Lieutenant's Woman" (1968). It is not easy for me to read it because the language is deliberately complicated, extremely rich. The author tries to re-create the atmosphere of provincial Victorian England - the action takes place in a town called Lyme Bay, located on the English Channel shore, in 1867. Very interesting, fascinating, albeit challenging read. A deep mystery, and a very intriguing take of the author, who is bone of bones and flesh of the flesh of the Hippie era, on the intricacies of the Victorian mind and of the Victorian era.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Vlad on November 15, 2009, 03:06:47 AM
The Life of Alfred the Great

The Life of Christ by Fulton Sheen

The Soul After Death Seraphim Rose

I read a little of each in the tub and before bed.
How is the Fulton Sheen book? I toy with the idea of reading if from time to time.

Its really good its fairly deep but not as deep as Jesus of Nazareth by the Pope.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on November 15, 2009, 05:59:02 AM
"The Road to Reality- A Complete Guide to the Laws of the Universe" by Roger Penrose
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on November 15, 2009, 06:10:48 AM
"The Road to Reality- A Complete Guide to the Laws of the Universe" by Roger Penrose


Interesting. Sounds like a plausible subtitle for The Holy Bible. ;)

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on November 15, 2009, 06:28:06 AM
If only it was that easy to read.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on November 17, 2009, 02:07:21 AM
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

I'm finding it even better than when I first read it back in my teens.  Now that I've had more experience in life and relationships than I did back then, it resonates more deeply.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: David Young on November 19, 2009, 11:10:48 AM
Don't really know where else to put this question: I'm currently re-reading St Athanasius On The Incarnation (St Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996) and am puzzled. The Introduction says Athanasius was educated in Greek and wrote the book in Greek, but it is called "De Incarnatione Verbi Dei" which is Latin, and the appendix is Epistola ad Marcellinum (i.e. Athanasius on the Psalms). Why are the titles in Latin?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on November 19, 2009, 11:23:47 AM
^^ Because everything sounds better in Latin?  :laugh:

Maybe it was one of those works that was written in Greek, translated to Arabic, then Arabic to Latin.  Then from that Latin translation we have our modern translations and it has remained tradition to call it such?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: simplygermain on November 19, 2009, 12:18:50 PM
The Physiology of Taste , Meditations on Transendental Gastronomy- Bryllat Savarin

Just read, Good Things to Eat as recommended by Chef Rufus Estes

And really a good book, The Proper Care and Feeding of Husbands - Dr. Laura Schlessinger
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ms.hoorah on December 13, 2009, 12:31:52 AM
My latest book is called Mobbing:  Emotional Abuse in the American Workplace by Noa Zanolli Davenport, Ph.D.

Mobbing is ganging up by co-workers, subordinates or superiors in order to force someone out of the "workplace" through rumor, intimidation, humiliation, discrediting and isolation. 
 
Oh soooorry.  This isn’t the “What are You Reading?” thread. Or is it?

Post moved to its intended place.--YtterbiumAnalyst
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ms.hoorah on December 13, 2009, 08:26:10 PM
Borderline Personality Disorder -Survival Guide by Alex Chapman and Kim Gratz
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: mersch on December 14, 2009, 11:40:07 AM
The Mountain of Silence by Kvriacos C. Markides
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on December 14, 2009, 01:47:17 PM
Don't really know where else to put this question: I'm currently re-reading St Athanasius On The Incarnation (St Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996) and am puzzled. The Introduction says Athanasius was educated in Greek and wrote the book in Greek, but it is called "De Incarnatione Verbi Dei" which is Latin, and the appendix is Epistola ad Marcellinum (i.e. Athanasius on the Psalms). Why are the titles in Latin?

David,

It has been traditional to relate works written in Greek by their translation into Latin.  As a classicist, I have several editions of works by Greeks where the titles are given in Latin.  It's just one of those things that really we've never gotten away from.

As for me, I just finished reading Glenn Beck's Arguing with Idiots.  Very entertaining, in any number of ways.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Marc1152 on December 14, 2009, 02:13:51 PM
"The Paleo Diet" by a Dr. Loren Cordain

http://www.thepaleodiet.com/
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on December 14, 2009, 04:19:16 PM
Preface to Metaphysics
-Jaques Maritain
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: stanley123 on December 15, 2009, 02:48:52 AM
Preface to Metaphysics
-Jaques Maritain
Do you think that Maritain was a modernist whose views made Vatican II possible?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on December 15, 2009, 08:19:31 PM
Preface to Metaphysics
-Jaques Maritain
Do you think that Maritain was a modernist whose views made Vatican II possible?
My Thomists of choice have always been Josef Pieper and Norris Clarke. As for Maritain, I don't know much about his views outside of the realm of Thomistic philosophy and Metaphysics. In those areas I think he is a superb philosopher as his emphasis on existential Thomism helps to solve some of the problems in metaphysics not addressed by previous Thomists. So is he a modernist? Most certainly not in the way Pius X defined modernism. But I will have to look more into his views on the Church and government to be able to properly answer that question.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on December 15, 2009, 08:21:18 PM
Preface to Metaphysics
-Jaques Maritain
Do you think that Maritain was a modernist whose views made Vatican II possible?
And just to be clear, I have no problem with the documents of Vaticatn II themselves, but rather with the way in which the directives wre implemented.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on December 15, 2009, 08:22:39 PM
Oh, and once again, I am reading the Summa.  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: simplygermain on December 16, 2009, 12:11:18 PM
We Shall See Him As He Is - Elder Archimandrite Sophrony
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on December 21, 2009, 05:31:30 PM
Prayers From the East: Traditions of Eastern Christianity, edited by Richard Marsh. From what I can tell, this book consists of prayers that come from Oriental Orthodox sources (Armenian, Coptic, etc.) I've had it since last Christmas, but am just now getting to it.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on December 21, 2009, 06:07:00 PM
Prayers From the East: Traditions of Eastern Christianity, edited by Richard Marsh. From what I can tell, this book consists of prayers that come from Oriental Orthodox sources (Armenian, Coptic, etc.) I've had it since last Christmas, but am just now getting to it.

Cool. Sounds great. Please let us know how you like it as your progress. I may want to read it myself.

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on December 21, 2009, 06:31:08 PM
73 pages into "The Ascetic of Love". All I can say at this stage is "Wow!"
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: philalethe00 on December 21, 2009, 07:09:03 PM
A lot, as usual.   :-[ :)
But there is a truly special book in all these, by Th. Ziakas, called
"The contemporary nihilism".
I'm afraid it's unavailable in english.....  :( For the moment.  :)

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Vlad on December 22, 2009, 12:23:21 AM
On the Prayer of Jesus By St Ignatius Brianchaninov
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on December 22, 2009, 02:06:48 AM
(http://www.agape-bookstore.com/images/BC1154.jpg)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: David Young on December 23, 2009, 10:31:00 AM
"Fare well to Anatolia" by Dido Sotiriou (in translation, I confess) pub. Kedros, Athens, 1991. "A tale of paradise lost and of shattered innocence: a tragic fresco of the fall of Hellensim in Asia Minor... a perennial bestseller in Greece since it first appeared in 1962."
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on December 24, 2009, 06:06:06 PM
Prayers From the East: Traditions of Eastern Christianity, edited by Richard Marsh. From what I can tell, this book consists of prayers that come from Oriental Orthodox sources (Armenian, Coptic, etc.) I've had it since last Christmas, but am just now getting to it.

Cool. Sounds great. Please let us know how you like it as your progress. I may want to read it myself.

Selam

I'll give a few excerpts and an overview once I'm finished. :)

As for new books being read, I just got these for Christmas from my Father today, and hopefully I'll be able to dig into them starting tonight after Christmas Eve service (if I can resist the temptation to spend all my time on Dragon Age: Origins!)...

What is This Thing Called Science?, by A.F. Chalmers
The Life in Christ, by St. Nicholas Cabasilas
Byzantine Theology: Historical Trends and Doctrinal Themes, by Fr. John Meyendorff
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on December 24, 2009, 07:01:24 PM
(if I can resist the temptation to spend all my time on Dragon Age: Origins!)...

Cave in!  You have a fictitious world to save from the Blight!  :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on December 25, 2009, 06:12:40 AM
My favourite Christmas present this year:
"B is For Botox- An Alphabet Book For The Middle-Aged"  by Ross & Kathryn Petras



(http://www.more.com/images/photo/image/67/95/photo/6795/original/51KWadjgA0L._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Τιμόθεος on January 06, 2010, 02:46:17 AM
The Lives of the Pillars of Orthodoxy  Holy Apostles Convent

The Fellowship of The Ring  JRR Tolkien

and assorted bits from:

The Philokalia
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on January 06, 2010, 02:54:51 AM
Τιμόθεος, how is your parish doing?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on January 06, 2010, 03:01:28 AM
Ivan Bratko's PROLOG Programming for Artificial Intelligence
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Τιμόθεος on January 06, 2010, 03:02:50 AM
Τιμόθεος, how is your parish doing?


Alveus,

     You remember!  Almost everyone is chipping in, and we had at least one month of not losing money, but our Priest is going to take up part-time secular employment and take a large pay cut.  It will not do for long term, and we will unfortunately have less services in the mean time, but it will keep us afloat.  I believe we will pull through though.  

     Thanks everyone for your prayers!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Andrew21091 on January 13, 2010, 06:02:23 PM
As of late, I have been reading Saint Arsenios the Cappadocian by Elder Paisios which I will probably finish tonight. Next, I'm going to read Seven Pillars of Wisdom by T.E. Lawrence (aka Lawrence of Arabia).
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on January 18, 2010, 04:49:41 AM
An Agnostic's Apology: And Other Essays by Leslie Stephen. I just got done reading the first essay tonight, An Agnostic's Apology. That's probably the fourth or fifth time I've read it. Parts of it are somewhat bland, parts of it are poorly argued, but some parts really shine. And the last few paragraphs sum up quite well how I often feel. I've never read the rest of the essays in this volume, and I'm looking forward to getting to them.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on January 19, 2010, 01:45:58 PM
My favourite Christmas present this year:
"B is For Botox- An Alphabet Book For The Middle-Aged"  by Ross & Kathryn Petras



(http://www.more.com/images/photo/image/67/95/photo/6795/original/51KWadjgA0L._SS500_.jpg)
You are not really middle-aged. LOL
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on January 21, 2010, 02:53:20 AM
Just got this in the mail a couple days ago, and am moments away from diving into it: The Art of Always Being Right: The 38 Subtle Ways of Persuasion by Arthur Schopenhauer. It has chapters like "Make your opponent angry" and "Become personal, insulting, rude". In other words, become like GiC  :P
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on January 21, 2010, 04:56:04 PM
I just read the last Chapter of Dante's Divine Comedy. It was breathtakingly beautiful.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Doubting Thomas on January 21, 2010, 11:09:11 PM
Just finished Irenaeus, Against Heresies, now reading his 'Lost Fragments'.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Get_Behind_Me_Satan on January 23, 2010, 08:30:19 AM
Everyone should read the spiritual psalter created by st Theophan the Recluce written by st Ephraim the Syrian.

Here is another masterpiece, it even has a cd that is for the reading impaired, and is has information on ancient monasticsm pictures, and other cool stuff.
here it is, a masterpiece of spiritual advice: St Abba dorotheos, 'Practical teachings of the Christian life.'
Its written for monks, but it is a treasure for everyone to acknowledge and take to heart.

http://www.stspress.com/detail.aspx?ID=2990
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Get_Behind_Me_Satan on January 23, 2010, 09:10:11 AM
Everyone should read the spiritual psalter created by St Theophan the Recluce, and written by St Ephraim the Syrian. This is a true jewel of our days.

http://www.archangelsbooks.com/proddetail.asp?prod=sjkephrai-01

Here is another masterpiece, it even has a cd that is for the reading impaired, and is has information on ancient monasticsm pictures, and other cool stuff.
here it is, a masterpiece of spiritual advice: St Abba dorotheos, 'Practical teachings of the Christian life.'
Its written for monks, but it is a treasure for everyone to acknowledge and take to heart.

http://www.stspress.com/detail.aspx?ID=2990

this is a book for everyone:http://www.uncutmountainsupply.com/proddetail.asp?prod=EXOMO

I'm reading these and a commentary on revelation by called 'Ancient Christian Commentary on Scriptures' Be carful with these commentaries becauce they include some (very few) heretics in the work, but other that that it is rich in knowledge, its a book really made for  college students who want to study, but not exactly orthodox, so be carful to not be poisoned, they seem to be endorsing the athiest Origen because when you look in the index of fathers in the back of the book, they say that he may have been '(perhaps unjustly condemned)' for his deadly, poisonous heresy which has hurt many souls, even my own mother. This is simply the spirit of the anti-christ seeping into peoples souls, for St John of the Ladder says 'let us beware lest we sicken in heart by the disease of the athiest origen' then he says that it is a heresy readily accepted by lovers of pleasure so they can wallow in the filth of sensuallity.
In his chapter on joy-making mourning or it might be on pain-staking repentance I don't have it in my hand right now so im not sure.

'let us beware lest we sicken in heart by the disease of the athiest origen'

Wise words for all the poison that is being spewed out by the spirit of the anti-christ.

So the book I have has a kind of seal, or stamp of poison, that makes it onimous.
I even bought it at a orthodox merchant right here: http://www.orthodoxpress.org/
It would be a highly, highly, recommended book for orthodox Christians but the poison it has in is sooo destructive it should not be trusted to keep them in possesion for long, I bought 4 of those commentaries and they all are stamped with this seal, this seal of evil, this stamp of heresy,
It is unnacceptable!

This how they are selling them to us, just like feeding babies candy with poison in it; 

http://www.orthodoxpress.org/catalog/comment.htm
'ANCIENT CHRISTIAN COMMENTARY ON SCRIPTURE. Edited by Thomas C. Oden and Christopher A. Hall. This will be a 27 volume series of Patristic Commentaries on the Old and New Testament. This series gives the commentaries of the Church Fathers, as well as ecclesiastical writers like Augustine, Origen, Clement of Alexandria, on the Holy Scriptures. It faithfully presents the writings of the Fathers and early church writers on the various scriptural passages. A valuable reference work for our Orthodox clergy and for the Orthodox Christian who is seeking a patristic  commentary on the scriptures. List price: $40.00 Our price per volume: Cloth'
 


Sad but true, im gonna have to mark over the poison in the biographies where it says that Origen was 'perhaps unfairly' condemned for his heresy. This is unnacceptable!
This is Poison! Seeping into the clean orthodox waters! And Orthodox publishers are selling them!
They are books that are not blessed by a archbishop or a head of orthodoxy, so they should not be sold from orthodox merchants!

Poison from the anti-christ!

'let us beware lest we sicken in heart by the disease of the athiest origen'
Our blessed and holy father St John of the Ladder

Get behind thee satan!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on January 24, 2010, 04:02:12 AM
Just got this in the mail a couple days ago, and am moments away from diving into it: The Art of Always Being Right: The 38 Subtle Ways of Persuasion by Arthur Schopenhauer. It has chapters like "Make your opponent angry" and "Become personal, insulting, rude". In other words, become like GiC  :P

BURN!

Oh, sorry, too much That 70s Show lately... ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Agia Marina on January 24, 2010, 09:59:30 PM
"Surprised by Christ" - very interesting story of Father James Bernstein's conversion from Conservative Judaism to Orthodox Christianity.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: HandmaidenofGod on January 24, 2010, 11:42:06 PM
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on January 25, 2010, 01:50:22 AM
Finishing up "The Trial" by Franz Kafka.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on January 26, 2010, 11:53:09 PM
Councils from the Holy Mountain - Elder Ephraim of Florence, Arizona
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Get_Behind_Me_Satan on January 27, 2010, 02:27:29 AM
Anything and everything that is not worldly.

I'm addicted to reading, its my passion.

I love spiritual knowledge it is great;y to be desired above all other riches.

Psa. 19:10 More to be desired are they than gold, yea, than much fine gold: sweeter also than honey and the honeycomb.

1Cor. 1:20 Where is the wise? where is the scribe? where is the disputer of this world? hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world?
1Cor. 2:6 Howbeit we speak wisdom among them that are perfect: yet not the wisdom of this world, nor of the princes of this world, that come to nought:
1Cor. 3:19 For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God. For it is written, He taketh the wise in their own craftiness.

Read this and it will help to find her:

XIV.--THE FIRST CONFERENCE OF ABBOT NESTEROS; ON SPIRITUAL KNOWLEDGE.

Ex. 28:3 And thou shalt speak unto all that are wise hearted, whom I have filled with the spirit of wisdom, that they may make Aaron’s garments to consecrate him, that he may minister unto me in the priest’s office.
Ex. 31:3 And I have filled him with the spirit of God, in wisdom, and in understanding, and in knowledge, and in all manner of workmanship,
Ex. 31:6 And I, behold, I have given with him Aholiab, the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan: and in the hearts of all that are wise hearted I have put wisdom, that they may make all that I have commanded thee;
Ex. 35:26 And all the women whose heart stirred them up in wisdom spun goats’ hair.
Ex. 35:31 And he hath filled him with the spirit of God, in wisdom, in understanding, and in knowledge, and in all manner of workmanship;
Ex. 35:35 Them hath he filled with wisdom of heart, to work all manner of work, of the engraver, and of the cunning workman, and of the embroiderer, in blue, and in purple, in scarlet, and in fine linen, and of the weaver, even of them that do any work, and of those that devise cunning work.
Ex. 36:1 Then wrought Bezaleel and Aholiab, and every wise hearted man, in whom the LORD put wisdom and understanding to know how to work all manner of work for the service of the sanctuary, according to all that the LORD had commanded.
Ex. 36:2 And Moses called Bezaleel and Aholiab, and every wise hearted man, in whose heart the LORD had put wisdom, even every one whose heart stirred him up to come unto the work to do it:
Deut. 4:6 Keep therefore and do them; for this is your wisdom and your understanding in the sight of the nations, which shall hear all these statutes, and say, Surely this great nation is a wise and understanding people.
Deut. 34:9 And Joshua the son of Nun was full of the spirit of wisdom; for Moses had laid his hands upon him: and the children of Israel hearkened unto him, and did as the LORD commanded Moses.
2Sam. 14:20 To fetch about this form of speech hath thy servant Joab done this thing: and my lord is wise, according to the wisdom of an angel of God, to know all things that are in the earth.
2Sam. 20:22 Then the woman went unto all the people in her wisdom. And they cut off the head of Sheba the son of Bichri, and cast it out to Joab. And he blew a trumpet, and they retired from the city, every man to his tent. And Joab returned to Jerusalem unto the king.
1Kings 2:6 Do therefore according to thy wisdom, and let not his hoar head go down to the grave in peace.
1Kings 3:28 And all Israel heard of the judgment which the king had judged; and they feared the king: for they saw that the wisdom of God was in him, to do judgment.
1Kings 4:29 And God gave Solomon wisdom and understanding exceeding much, and largeness of heart, even as the sand that is on the sea shore.
1Kings 4:30 And Solomon’s wisdom excelled the wisdom of all the children of the east country, and all the wisdom of Egypt.
1Kings 4:34 And there came of all people to hear the wisdom of Solomon, from all kings of the earth, which had heard of his wisdom.
1Kings 5:12 And the LORD gave Solomon wisdom, as he promised him: and there was peace between Hiram and Solomon; and they two made a league together.
1Kings 7:14 He was a widow’s son of the tribe of Naphtali, and his father was a man of Tyre, a worker in brass: and he was filled with wisdom, and understanding, and cunning to work all works in brass. And he came to king Solomon, and wrought all his work.
1Kings 10:4 And when the queen of Sheba had seen all Solomon’s wisdom, and the house that he had built,
1Kings 10:6 And she said to the king, It was a true report that I heard in mine own land of thy acts and of thy wisdom.
1Kings 10:7 Howbeit I believed not the words, until I came, and mine eyes had seen it: and, behold, the half was not told me: thy wisdom and prosperity exceedeth the fame which I heard.
1Kings 10:8 Happy are thy men, happy are these thy servants, which stand continually before thee, and that hear thy wisdom.
1Kings 10:23 So king Solomon exceeded all the kings of the earth for riches and for wisdom.
1Kings 10:24 And all the earth sought to Solomon, to hear his wisdom, which God had put in his heart.
1Kings 11:41 And the rest of the acts of Solomon, and all that he did, and his wisdom, are they not written in the book of the acts of Solomon?
1Chr. 22:12 Only the LORD give thee wisdom and understanding, and give thee charge concerning Israel, that thou mayest keep the law of the LORD thy God.
2Chr. 1:10 Give me now wisdom and knowledge, that I may go out and come in before this people: for who can judge this thy people, that is so great?
2Chr. 1:11 And God said to Solomon, Because this was in thine heart, and thou hast not asked riches, wealth, or honour, nor the life of thine enemies, neither yet hast asked long life; but hast asked wisdom and knowledge for thyself, that thou mayest judge my people, over whom I have made thee king:
2Chr. 1:12 Wisdom and knowledge is granted unto thee; and I will give thee riches, and wealth, and honour, such as none of the kings have had that have been before thee, neither shall there any after thee have the like.
2Chr. 9:3 And when the queen of Sheba had seen the wisdom of Solomon, and the house that he had built,
2Chr. 9:5 And she said to the king, It was a true report which I heard in mine own land of thine acts, and of thy wisdom:
2Chr. 9:6 Howbeit I believed not their words, until I came, and mine eyes had seen it: and, behold, the one half of the greatness of thy wisdom was not told me: for thou exceedest the fame that I heard.
2Chr. 9:7 Happy are thy men, and happy are these thy servants, which stand continually before thee, and hear thy wisdom.
2Chr. 9:22 And king Solomon passed all the kings of the earth in riches and wisdom.
2Chr. 9:23 And all the kings of the earth sought the presence of Solomon, to hear his wisdom, that God had put in his heart.
Ezra 7:25 And thou, Ezra, after the wisdom of thy God, that is in thine hand, set magistrates and judges, which may judge all the people that are beyond the river, all such as know the laws of thy God; and teach ye them that know them not.
Job 4:21 Doth not their excellency which is in them go away? they die, even without wisdom.
Job 6:13 Is not my help in me? and is wisdom driven quite from me?
Job 11:6 And that he would shew thee the secrets of wisdom, that they are double to that which is! Know therefore that God exacteth of thee less than thine iniquity deserveth.
Job 12:2 No doubt but ye are the people, and wisdom shall die with you.
Job 12:12 With the ancient is wisdom; and in length of days understanding.
Job 12:13 With him is wisdom and strength, he hath counsel and understanding.
Job 12:16 With him is strength and wisdom: the deceived and the deceiver are his.
Job 13:5 O that ye would altogether hold your peace! and it should be your wisdom.
Job 15:8 Hast thou heard the secret of God? and dost thou restrain wisdom to thyself?
Job 26:3 How hast thou counselled him that hath no wisdom? and how hast thou plentifully declared the thing as it is?
Job 28:12 But where shall wisdom be found? and where is the place of understanding?
Job 28:18 No mention shall be made of coral, or of pearls: for the price of wisdom is above rubies.
Job 28:20 Whence then cometh wisdom? and where is the place of understanding?
Job 28:28 And unto man he said, Behold, the fear of the Lord, that is wisdom; and to depart from evil is understanding.
Job 32:7 I said, Days should speak, and multitude of years should teach wisdom.
Job 32:13 Lest ye should say, We have found out wisdom: God thrusteth him down, not man.
Job 33:33 If not, hearken unto me: hold thy peace, and I shall teach thee wisdom.
Job 34:35 Job hath spoken without knowledge, and his words were without wisdom.
Job 36:5 Behold, God is mighty, and despiseth not any: he is mighty in strength and wisdom.
Job 38:36 Who hath put wisdom in the inward parts? or who hath given understanding to the heart?
Job 38:37 Who can number the clouds in wisdom? or who can stay the bottles of heaven,
Job 39:17 Because God hath deprived her of wisdom, neither hath he imparted to her understanding.
Job 39:26 Doth the hawk fly by thy wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south?
Psa. 37:30 The mouth of the righteous speaketh wisdom, and his tongue talketh of judgment.
Psa. 49:3 My mouth shall speak of wisdom; and the meditation of my heart shall be of understanding.
Psa. 51:6 Behold, thou desirest truth in the inward parts: and in the hidden part thou shalt make me to know wisdom.
Psa. 90:12 So teach us to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.
Psa. 104:24 O LORD, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom hast thou made them all: the earth is full of thy riches.
Psa. 105:22 To bind his princes at his pleasure; and teach his senators wisdom.
Psa. 111:10 The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom: a good understanding have all they that do his commandments: his praise endureth for ever.
Psa. 136:5 To him that by wisdom made the heavens: for his mercy endureth for ever.
Prov. 1:2 To know wisdom and instruction; to perceive the words of understanding;
Prov. 1:3 To receive the instruction of wisdom, justice, and judgment, and equity;
Prov. 1:7 The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge: but fools despise wisdom and instruction.
Prov. 1:20 Wisdom crieth without; she uttereth her voice in the streets:
Prov. 2:2 So that thou incline thine ear unto wisdom, and apply thine heart to understanding;
Prov. 2:6 For the LORD giveth wisdom: out of his mouth cometh knowledge and understanding.
Prov. 2:7 He layeth up sound wisdom for the righteous: he is a buckler to them that walk uprightly.
Prov. 2:10 When wisdom entereth into thine heart, and knowledge is pleasant unto thy soul;
Prov. 3:13 Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, and the man that getteth understanding.
Prov. 3:19 The LORD by wisdom hath founded the earth; by understanding hath he established the heavens.
Prov. 3:21 My son, let not them depart from thine eyes: keep sound wisdom and discretion:
Prov. 4:5 Get wisdom, get understanding: forget it not; neither decline from the words of my mouth.
Prov. 4:7 Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: and with all thy getting get understanding.
Prov. 4:11 I have taught thee in the way of wisdom; I have led thee in right paths.
Prov. 5:1 My son, attend unto my wisdom, and bow thine ear to my understanding:
Prov. 7:4 Say unto wisdom, Thou art my sister; and call understanding thy kinswoman:
Prov. 8:1 Doth not wisdom cry? and understanding put forth her voice?
Prov. 8:5 O ye simple, understand wisdom: and, ye fools, be ye of an understanding heart.
Prov. 8:11 For wisdom is better than rubies; and all the things that may be desired are not to be compared to it.
Prov. 8:12 I wisdom dwell with prudence, and find out knowledge of witty inventions.
Prov. 8:14 Counsel is mine, and sound wisdom: I am understanding; I have strength.
Prov. 9:1 Wisdom hath builded her house, she hath hewn out her seven pillars:
Prov. 9:10 The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom: and the knowledge of the holy is understanding.
Prov. 10:13 In the lips of him that hath understanding wisdom is found: but a rod is for the back of him that is void of understanding.
Prov. 10:21 The lips of the righteous feed many: but fools die for want of wisdom.
Prov. 10:23 It is as sport to a fool to do mischief: but a man of understanding hath wisdom.
Prov. 10:31 The mouth of the just bringeth forth wisdom: but the froward tongue shall be cut out.
Prov. 11:2 When pride cometh, then cometh shame: but with the lowly is wisdom.
Prov. 11:12 He that is void of wisdom despiseth his neighbour: but a man of understanding holdeth his peace.
Prov. 12:8 A man shall be commended according to his wisdom: but he that is of a perverse heart shall be despised.
Prov. 13:10 Only by pride cometh contention: but with the well advised is wisdom.
Prov. 14:6 A scorner seeketh wisdom, and findeth it not: but knowledge is easy unto him that understandeth.
Prov. 14:8 The wisdom of the prudent is to understand his way: but the folly of fools is deceit.
Prov. 14:33 Wisdom resteth in the heart of him that hath understanding: but that which is in the midst of fools is made known.
Prov. 15:21 Folly is joy to him that is destitute of wisdom: but a man of understanding walketh uprightly.
Prov. 15:33 The fear of the LORD is the instruction of wisdom; and before honour is humility.
Prov. 16:16 How much better is it to get wisdom than gold! and to get understanding rather to be chosen than silver!
Prov. 17:16 Wherefore is there a price in the hand of a fool to get wisdom, seeing he hath no heart to it?
Prov. 17:24 Wisdom is before him that hath understanding; but the eyes of a fool are in the ends of the earth.
Prov. 18:1 Through desire a man, having separated himself, seeketh and intermeddleth with all wisdom.
Prov. 18:4 The words of a man’s mouth are as deep waters, and the wellspring of wisdom as a flowing brook.
Prov. 19:8 He that getteth wisdom loveth his own soul: he that keepeth understanding shall find good.
Prov. 21:30 There is no wisdom nor understanding nor counsel against the LORD.
Prov. 23:4 Labour not to be rich: cease from thine own wisdom.
Prov. 23:9 Speak not in the ears of a fool: for he will despise the wisdom of thy words.
Prov. 23:23 Buy the truth, and sell it not; also wisdom, and instruction, and understanding.
Prov. 24:3 Through wisdom is an house builded; and by understanding it is established:
Prov. 24:7 Wisdom is too high for a fool: he openeth not his mouth in the gate.
Prov. 24:14 So shall the knowledge of wisdom be unto thy soul: when thou hast found it, then there shall be a reward, and thy expectation shall not be cut off.
Prov. 29:3 Whoso loveth wisdom rejoiceth his father: but he that keepeth company with harlots spendeth his substance.
Prov. 29:15 The rod and reproof give wisdom: but a child left to himself bringeth his mother to shame.
Prov. 30:3 I neither learned wisdom, nor have the knowledge of the holy.
Prov. 31:26 She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness.
Eccl. 1:13 And I gave my heart to seek and search out by wisdom concerning all things that are done under heaven: this sore travail hath God given to the sons of man to be exercised therewith.
Eccl. 1:16 I communed with mine own heart, saying, Lo, I am come to great estate, and have gotten more wisdom than all they that have been before me in Jerusalem: yea, my heart had great experience of wisdom and knowledge.
Eccl. 1:17 And I gave my heart to know wisdom, and to know madness and folly: I perceived that this also is vexation of spirit.
Eccl. 1:18 For in much wisdom is much grief: and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.
Eccl. 2:3 I sought in mine heart to give myself unto wine, yet acquainting mine heart with wisdom; and to lay hold on folly, till I might see what was that good for the sons of men, which they should do under the heaven all the days of their life.
Eccl. 2:9 So I was great, and increased more than all that were before me in Jerusalem: also my wisdom remained with me.
Eccl. 2:12 And I turned myself to behold wisdom, and madness, and folly: for what can the man do that cometh after the king? even that which hath been already done.
Eccl. 2:13 Then I saw that wisdom excelleth folly, as far as light excelleth darkness.
Eccl. 2:21 For there is a man whose labour is in wisdom, and in knowledge, and in equity; yet to a man that hath not laboured therein shall he leave it for his portion. This also is vanity and a great evil.
Eccl. 2:26 For God giveth to a man that is good in his sight wisdom, and knowledge, and joy: but to the sinner he giveth travail, to gather and to heap up, that he may give to him that is good before God. This also is vanity and vexation of spirit.
Eccl. 7:11 Wisdom is good with an inheritance: and by it there is profit to them that see the sun.
Eccl. 7:12 For wisdom is a defence, and money is a defence: but the excellency of knowledge is, that wisdom giveth life to them that have it.
Eccl. 7:19 Wisdom strengtheneth the wise more than ten mighty men which are in the city.
Eccl. 7:23 All this have I proved by wisdom: I said, I will be wise; but it was far from me.
Eccl. 7:25 I applied mine heart to know, and to search, and to seek out wisdom, and the reason of things, and to know the wickedness of folly, even of foolishness and madness:
Eccl. 8:1 Who is as the wise man? and who knoweth the interpretation of a thing? a man’s wisdom maketh his face to shine, and the boldness of his face shall be changed.
Eccl. 8:16 When I applied mine heart to know wisdom, and to see the business that is done upon the earth: (for also there is that neither day nor night seeth sleep with his eyes:)
Eccl. 9:10 Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might; for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave, whither thou goest.
Eccl. 9:13 This wisdom have I seen also under the sun, and it seemed great unto me:
Eccl. 9:15 Now there was found in it a poor wise man, and he by his wisdom delivered the city; yet no man remembered that same poor man.
Eccl. 9:16 Then said I, Wisdom is better than strength: nevertheless the poor man’s wisdom is despised, and his words are not heard.
Eccl. 9:18 Wisdom is better than weapons of war: but one sinner destroyeth much good.
Eccl. 10:1 Dead flies cause the ointment of the apothecary to send forth a stinking savour: so doth a little folly him that is in reputation for wisdom and honour.
Eccl. 10:3 Yea also, when he that is a fool walketh by the way, his wisdom faileth him, and he saith to every one that he is a fool.
Eccl. 10:10 If the iron be blunt, and he do not whet the edge, then must he put to more strength: but wisdom is profitable to direct.
Is. 10:13 For he saith, By the strength of my hand I have done it, and by my wisdom; for I am prudent: and I have removed the bounds of the people, and have robbed their treasures, and I have put down the inhabitants like a valiant man:
Is. 11:2 And the spirit of the LORD shall rest upon him, the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and of the fear of the LORD;
Is. 29:14 Therefore, behold, I will proceed to do a marvellous work among this people, even a marvellous work and a wonder: for the wisdom of their wise men shall perish, and the understanding of their prudent men shall be hid.
Is. 33:6 And wisdom and knowledge shall be the stability of thy times, and strength of salvation: the fear of the LORD is his treasure.
Is. 47:10 For thou hast trusted in thy wickedness: thou hast said, None seeth me. Thy wisdom and thy knowledge, it hath perverted thee; and thou hast said in thine heart, I am, and none else beside me.
Jer. 8:9 The wise men are ashamed, they are dismayed and taken: lo, they have rejected the word of the LORD; and what wisdom is in them?
Jer. 9:23 Thus saith the LORD, Let not the wise man glory in his wisdom, neither let the mighty man glory in his might, let not the rich man glory in his riches:
Jer. 10:12 He hath made the earth by his power, he hath established the world by his wisdom, and hath stretched out the heavens by his discretion.
Jer. 49:7 Concerning Edom, thus saith the LORD of hosts; Is wisdom no more in Teman? is counsel perished from the prudent? is their wisdom vanished?
Jer. 51:15 He hath made the earth by his power, he hath established the world by his wisdom, and hath stretched out the heaven by his understanding.
Ezek. 28:4 With thy wisdom and with thine understanding thou hast gotten thee riches, and hast gotten gold and silver into thy treasures:
Ezek. 28:5 By thy great wisdom and by thy traffick hast thou increased thy riches, and thine heart is lifted up because of thy riches:
Ezek. 28:7 Behold, therefore I will bring strangers upon thee, the terrible of the nations: and they shall draw their swords against the beauty of thy wisdom, and they shall defile thy brightness.
Ezek. 28:12 Son of man, take up a lamentation upon the king of Tyrus, and say unto him, Thus saith the Lord GOD; Thou sealest up the sum, full of wisdom, and perfect in beauty.
Ezek. 28:17 Thine heart was lifted up because of thy beauty, thou hast corrupted thy wisdom by reason of thy brightness: I will cast thee to the ground, I will lay thee before kings, that they may behold thee.
Dan. 1:4 Children in whom was no blemish, but well favoured, and skilful in all wisdom, and cunning in knowledge, and understanding science, and such as had ability in them to stand in the king’s palace, and whom they might teach the learning and the tongue of the Chaldeans.
Dan. 1:17 As for these four children, God gave them knowledge and skill in all learning and wisdom: and Daniel had understanding in all visions and dreams.
Dan. 1:20 And in all matters of wisdom and understanding, that the king inquired of them, he found them ten times better than all the magicians and astrologers that were in all his realm.
Dan. 2:14 Then Daniel answered with counsel and wisdom to Arioch the captain of the king’s guard, which was gone forth to slay the wise men of Babylon:
Dan. 2:20 Daniel answered and said, Blessed be the name of God for ever and ever: for wisdom and might are his:
Dan. 2:21 And he changeth the times and the seasons: he removeth kings, and setteth up kings: he giveth wisdom unto the wise, and knowledge to them that know understanding:
Dan. 2:23 I thank thee, and praise thee, O thou God of my fathers, who hast given me wisdom and might, and hast made known unto me now what we desired of thee: for thou hast now made known unto us the king’s matter.
Dan. 2:30 But as for me, this secret is not revealed to me for any wisdom that I have more than any living, but for their sakes that shall make known the interpretation to the king, and that thou mightest know the thoughts of thy heart.
Dan. 5:11 There is a man in thy kingdom, in whom is the spirit of the holy gods; and in the days of thy father light and understanding and wisdom, like the wisdom of the gods, was found in him; whom the king Nebuchadnezzar thy father, the king, I say, thy father, made master of the magicians, astrologers, Chaldeans, and soothsayers;
Dan. 5:14 I have even heard of thee, that the spirit of the gods is in thee, and that light and understanding and excellent wisdom is found in thee.
Mic. 6:9 The LORD’s voice crieth unto the city, and the man of wisdom shall see thy name: hear ye the rod, and who hath appointed it.
Matt. 11:19 The Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, Behold a man gluttonous, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners. But wisdom is justified of her children.
Matt. 12:42 The queen of the south shall rise up in the judgment with this generation, and shall condemn it: for she came from the uttermost parts of the earth to hear the wisdom of Solomon; and, behold, a greater than Solomon is here.
Matt. 13:54 And when he was come into his own country, he taught them in their synagogue, insomuch that they were astonished, and said, Whence hath this man this wisdom, and these mighty works?
Mark 6:2 And when the sabbath day was come, he began to teach in the synagogue: and many hearing him were astonished, saying, From whence hath this man these things? and what wisdom is this which is given unto him, that even such mighty works are wrought by his hands?
Luke 1:17 And he shall go before him in the spirit and power of Elias, to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just; to make ready a people prepared for the Lord.
Luke 2:40 And the child grew, and waxed strong in spirit, filled with wisdom: and the grace of God was upon him.
Luke 2:52 And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man.
Luke 7:35 But wisdom is justified of all her children.
Luke 11:31 The queen of the south shall rise up in the judgment with the men of this generation, and condemn them: for she came from the utmost parts of the earth to hear the wisdom of Solomon; and, behold, a greater than Solomon is here.
Luke 11:49 Therefore also said the wisdom of God, I will send them prophets and apostles, and some of them they shall slay and persecute:
Luke 21:15 For I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which all your adversaries shall not be able to gainsay nor resist.
Acts 6:3 Wherefore, brethren, look ye out among you seven men of honest report, full of the Holy Ghost and wisdom, whom we may appoint over this business.
Acts 6:10 And they were not able to resist the wisdom and the spirit by which he spake.
Acts 7:10 And delivered him out of all his afflictions, and gave him favour and wisdom in the sight of Pharaoh king of Egypt; and he made him governor over Egypt and all his house.
Acts 7:22 And Moses was learned in all the wisdom of the Egyptians, and was mighty in words and in deeds.
Rom. 11:33 O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out!
1Cor. 1:17 For Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the gospel: not with wisdom of words, lest the cross of Christ should be made of none effect.
1Cor. 1:19 For it is written, I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and will bring to nothing the understanding of the prudent.
1Cor. 1:20 Where is the wise? where is the scribe? where is the disputer of this world? hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world?
1Cor. 1:21 For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe.
1Cor. 1:22 For the Jews require a sign, and the Greeks seek after wisdom:
1Cor. 1:24 But unto them which are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God, and the wisdom of God.
1Cor. 1:30 But of him are ye in Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption:
1Cor. 2:1 And I, brethren, when I came to you, came not with excellency of speech or of wisdom, declaring unto you the testimony of God.
1Cor. 2:4 And my speech and my preaching was not with enticing words of man’s wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power:
1Cor. 2:5 That your faith should not stand in the wisdom of men, but in the power of God.
1Cor. 2:6 Howbeit we speak wisdom among them that are perfect: yet not the wisdom of this world, nor of the princes of this world, that come to nought:
1Cor. 2:7 But we speak the wisdom of God in a mystery, even the hidden wisdom, which God ordained before the world unto our glory:
1Cor. 2:13 Which things also we speak, not in the words which man’s wisdom teacheth, but which the Holy Ghost teacheth; comparing spiritual things with spiritual.
1Cor. 3:19 For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God. For it is written, He taketh the wise in their own craftiness.
1Cor. 12:8 For to one is given by the Spirit the word of wisdom; to another the word of knowledge by the same Spirit;
2Cor. 1:12 For our rejoicing is this, the testimony of our conscience, that in simplicity and godly sincerity, not with fleshly wisdom, but by the grace of God, we have had our conversation in the world, and more abundantly to you-ward.
Eph. 1:8 Wherein he hath abounded toward us in all wisdom and prudence;
Eph. 1:17 That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of him:
Eph. 3:10 To the intent that now unto the principalities and powers in heavenly places might be known by the church the manifold wisdom of God,
Col. 1:9 For this cause we also, since the day we heard it, do not cease to pray for you, and to desire that ye might be filled with the knowledge of his will in all wisdom and spiritual understanding;
Col. 1:28 Whom we preach, warning every man, and teaching every man in all wisdom; that we may present every man perfect in Christ Jesus:
Col. 2:3 In whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge.
Col. 2:23 Which things have indeed a shew of wisdom in will worship, and humility, and neglecting of the body; not in any honour to the satisfying of the flesh.
Col. 3:16 Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom; teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord.
Col. 4:5 Walk in wisdom toward them that are without, redeeming the time.
James 1:5 If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him.
James 3:13 Who is a wise man and endued with knowledge among you? let him shew out of a good conversation his works with meekness of wisdom.
James 3:15 This wisdom descendeth not from above, but is earthly, sensual, devilish.
James 3:17 But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be intreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy.
2Pet. 3:15 And account that the longsuffering of our Lord is salvation; even as our beloved brother Paul also according to the wisdom given unto him hath written unto you;
Rev. 5:12 Saying with a loud voice, Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing.
Rev. 7:12 Saying, Amen: Blessing, and glory, and wisdom, and thanksgiving, and honour, and power, and might, be unto our God for ever and ever. Amen.
Rev. 13:18 Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six.
Rev. 17:9 And here is the mind which hath wisdom. The seven heads are seven mountains, on which the woman sitteth.

St Issac of Syria says: 'It is a great evil for someone to read stunning texts, when in spiritual stature he is still an infant'

St ephraim says: 'Do not read the most brilliant texts, lest the demon of haughtiness capture your soul.


Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on January 27, 2010, 02:58:46 AM
David Rowe & Jeremy Gray's The Hilbert Challenge
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on January 27, 2010, 03:33:45 AM
Still on my vampire stint at the moment. Recently read Dead and Gone the nineth book in the Sookie Stackhouse series. Plowing through the Cirque du Freak series as it becomes available from the library. Have a stack of Diana Wynne Jones to get through before the library starts asking for them back. Serious reading includes The Illness and Cure of the Soul in the Orthodox Tradition.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on January 27, 2010, 03:02:32 PM
Orthodoxy and Heresy in Earliest Christianity by Walter Bauer

The thesis is essentially that some forms of Christianity that were later termed "heresy" were actually the native forms of Christianity established by some of the apostles, and that there was no pure dogma or anything of the sort to begin with.  We'll see if it's any good.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on January 27, 2010, 03:05:56 PM
On the Procession of the Holy Spirit
                                  -St. Anselm
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: AWR on January 27, 2010, 03:11:15 PM
Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder

With the tragic human suffering due to the recent earthquake in Haiti, I though I'd read about past conditions.
(very good so far)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Get_Behind_Me_Satan on January 27, 2010, 08:23:20 PM
Blessed Theoplact's commentary on the Gospels.

The Evergetinos (Sayings of the Desert Fathers)

Spiritual Psalter by St Ephraim the Syrian

The Art of Prayer

Archbishop Averky of blessed memory's The Apocalypse.

Translated by Seraphim Rose

St Leo The Great:
Admonitions
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf212.iii.iv.iv.xiv.html

This is for the complete healing and restoration of the soul.
For deliverance from hell.
And inheritance of the kingdom.

http://www.uncutmountainsupply.com/proddetail.asp?prod=EXOMO


The most grievious thing that I suffer with is self conceit.

It is a trully accursed passion, as St Maximos has stated.


Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Tikhon.of.Colorado on January 29, 2010, 12:14:49 AM
well at the present time I am deep into the book "The way of a pilgrim".  it is my favorite book.  after that, I'll probably read another religious book as this will further my knowledge religiously beyond what my priest teaches me at catechism class.   ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Nyssa The Hobbit on January 31, 2010, 02:41:29 AM
The Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church by Vladimir Lossky and Proven Innocent by Gerry Conlon.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Get_Behind_Me_Satan on February 02, 2010, 06:32:00 PM
The greatest book other than the bible is the Philokalia.

The whole book of Philokalia is on this website, I figured out how to unlock it so I can print it.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&hs=Zu6&q=philokalia+st+michael&aq=f&aqi=&oq=

Just click on the first site and it will download.

Beware of reading these books without a spiritual father to guide you.

They are very very advanced in alot of the writings.

But the knowledge contained in them is so marlevous.

1Cor. 1:20 Where is the wise? where is the scribe? where is the disputer of this world? hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world?

One of the greatest books ever created.

Read with caution.

Reading these books is like diving into another world

With love, In Christ

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Get_Behind_Me_Satan on February 02, 2010, 06:34:18 PM
The book is not for non orthodox people.

Non orthodox people could never have attained such knowledge
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Get_Behind_Me_Satan on February 02, 2010, 06:38:17 PM
For Orthodox Only:

The greatest book other than the bible is the Philokalia.

The whole book of Philokalia is on this website, I figured out how to unlock it so I can print it.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&hs=Zu6&q=philokalia+st+michael&aq=f&aqi=&oq=

Just click on the first site and it will download.

Beware of reading these books without a spiritual father to guide you.

They are very very advanced in alot of the writings.

But the knowledge contained in them is so marlevous.

1Cor. 1:20 Where is the wise? where is the scribe? where is the disputer of this world? hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world?

One of the greatest books ever created.

Read with caution.

Reading these books is like diving into another world

I warn you again, be carful

Non orthodox people could never have attained to this knowledge, not in a million years.

With love, In Christ


Please don't cross-post the same material to different sections of this forum.  Thank you.   -PtA
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on February 02, 2010, 06:48:46 PM
The Accidental Mind: How Brain Evolution Has Given Us Love, Memory, Dreams, and God by David J. Linden
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 02, 2010, 07:05:16 PM
The Accidental Mind: How Brain Evolution Has Given Us Love, Memory, Dreams, and God by David J. Linden

Sounds interesting! I shall have to add that to my wishlist.  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on February 02, 2010, 07:19:29 PM
The Accidental Mind: How Brain Evolution Has Given Us Love, Memory, Dreams, and God by David J. Linden

Sounds interesting! I shall have to add that to my wishlist.  ;D

So far it has been really enjoyable; I'd definitely recommend it!  Dr. David Linden has a great wit about himself.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 02, 2010, 07:23:55 PM
I've read the Philokalia. I feel so excited now, like I've taken a bite of forbidden fruit!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GiC on February 02, 2010, 07:25:29 PM
I've read the Philokalia. I feel so excited now, like I've taken a bite of forbidden fruit!

I thought the plot development was a little slow.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Get_Behind_Me_Satan on February 02, 2010, 09:31:03 PM
I've read the Philokalia. I feel so excited now, like I've taken a bite of forbidden fruit!

1Cor. 8:1 Now as touching things offered unto idols, we know that we all have knowledge. Knowledge puffeth up, but charity edifieth.

Theres a very important chapter in this book called 'Dangers of delusion'
http://www.philokalia.org/on_the_prayer_of_jesus.htm


You have to be very careful when reading these books.

It can make people crazy.

It can destroy you.

You just have to be careful when trying to practice the things written in these most sublime books.

Its mainly in praying that you must be careful.

http://www.philokalia.org/on_the_prayer_of_jesus.htm

This is a prayer which can be practiced by those without a spiritual father to some extent.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Get_Behind_Me_Satan on February 02, 2010, 10:08:14 PM
I've read the Philokalia. I feel so excited now, like I've taken a bite of forbidden fruit!

1Cor. 8:1 Now as touching things offered unto idols, we know that we all have knowledge. Knowledge puffeth up, but charity edifieth.

Theres a very important chapter in this book called 'Dangers of delusion'
http://www.philokalia.org/on_the_prayer_of_jesus.htm


You have to be very careful when reading these books.

It can make people crazy.

It can destroy you.

You just have to be careful when trying to practice the things written in these most sublime books.

Its mainly in praying that you must be careful.

http://www.philokalia.org/on_the_prayer_of_jesus.htm

This is a prayer which can be practiced by those without a spiritual father to some extent.



What I meant to say was, 'Listen to 'Higher Levels of Prayer'.

It speaks of delusion.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on February 03, 2010, 11:06:59 AM
I've read the Philokalia. I feel so excited now, like I've taken a bite of forbidden fruit!
Why are people told not to read it?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ozgeorge on February 03, 2010, 11:12:02 AM
I've read the Philokalia. I feel so excited now, like I've taken a bite of forbidden fruit!
Why are people told not to read it?
They aren't. I've never heard of people being told not to read it before the post above (for a possible explanation see: http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,25741.0.html
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 03, 2010, 11:17:37 AM
I've read the Philokalia. I feel so excited now, like I've taken a bite of forbidden fruit!
Why are people told not to read it?

I'm not sure. Maybe some worry that if a person reads it, that they'll getting ultra-zealous and start doing stuff like selling off everything they own, doing extreme fasts, praying for hours on end, etc. Not that those things are bad per se in Orthodoxy, but the problem might be that there is the worry that the person doing those things might get burnt out or otherwise spiritually harm themselves by trying to do too much. Generally the Orthodox spiritual life is supposed to be about a life long process of gradual growth, albeit punctuated here and there with significant events, and not about going from zero to sixty in mere seconds because you got motivated by something you read in a book. That would be my guess, anyway.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 03, 2010, 11:20:00 AM
I've read the Philokalia. I feel so excited now, like I've taken a bite of forbidden fruit!
Why are people told not to read it?
They aren't. I've never heard of people being told not to read it before the post above (for a possible explanation see: http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,25741.0.html

Well, I don't think it's the norm, but I have heard about it from time to time. I was just talking with someone yesterday in private message who told me that their priest had said something like that.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on February 04, 2010, 11:15:07 AM
I've read the Philokalia. I feel so excited now, like I've taken a bite of forbidden fruit!
Why are people told not to read it?

I'm not sure. Maybe some worry that if a person reads it, that they'll getting ultra-zealous and start doing stuff like selling off everything they own, doing extreme fasts, praying for hours on end, etc. Not that those things are bad per se in Orthodoxy, but the problem might be that there is the worry that the person doing those things might get burnt out or otherwise spiritually harm themselves by trying to do too much. Generally the Orthodox spiritual life is supposed to be about a life long process of gradual growth, albeit punctuated here and there with significant events, and not about going from zero to sixty in mere seconds because you got motivated by something you read in a book. That would be my guess, anyway.

Yes, I think you are probably right. It reminds me of something I was reading the other day:

"St. Moses the Black appears to have been zealous in everything that he undertook, and he soon became discouraged for he felt he was not becoming a perfect monk advanced in all the degrees of spiritual perfection. Early one morning before sunrise St. Isadore, the abbot of the monastary, took Brother Moses up on the roof of the monastary and together they watched the first rays of the dawn come over the horizon. They stayed on the roof until the new day had begun, and then the abbot said that only slowly do the rays of the sun drive away the night and usher in the new day and thus only slowly does one become a perfect contemplative."          [From The Ancient Black Christians ]  


Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on February 04, 2010, 11:16:34 AM
So I am finding that St. Anselm can be more difficult to read than St. Thomas Aquinas.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on February 04, 2010, 11:48:07 AM
The Accidental Mind: How Brain Evolution Has Given Us Love, Memory, Dreams, and God by David J. Linden

I'll go ahead and recommend you read Why We Believe What We Believe: Uncovering Our Biological Need for Meaning, Spirituality, and Truth by Andrew Newburg, M.D.

It's a fascinating read written for the general public, but not lacking in scholarly research and neuroscience. Highly enjoyable.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on February 04, 2010, 11:49:13 AM
I thought the plot development was a little slow.

What a surprise!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on February 04, 2010, 11:51:21 AM
I've read the Philokalia.

All four volumes of the English translation?

I'm waiting for a nicer hardcover English edition.  I'm sure the fathers therein would appreciate my spirit of acquisitiveness surrounding nice shiny editions of books.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on February 04, 2010, 11:54:18 AM
I'll go ahead and recommend you read Why We Believe What We Believe: Uncovering Our Biological Need for Meaning, Spirituality, and Truth by Andrew Newburg, M.D.

It's a fascinating read written for the general public, but not lacking in scholarly research and neuroscience. Highly enjoyable.
Already read it.  :P  It was worth the read, but it definitely lacked the wit of Dr. Linden.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on February 04, 2010, 01:11:57 PM
I've read the Philokalia.

All four volumes of the English translation?

I'm waiting for a nicer hardcover English edition.  I'm sure the fathers therein would appreciate my spirit of acquisitiveness surrounding nice shiny editions of books.

I posted this question elsewhere, but didn't get any response: Does anyone know how I can purchase or obtain an audio version of the Philokalia? I'd love to have it on CD.

Thanks

Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on February 04, 2010, 01:13:04 PM
I've read the Philokalia.

All four volumes of the English translation?

I'm waiting for a nicer hardcover English edition.  I'm sure the fathers therein would appreciate my spirit of acquisitiveness surrounding nice shiny editions of books.

I posted this question elsewhere, but didn't get any response: Does anyone know how I can purchase or obtain an audio version of the Philokalia? I'd love to have it on CD.

Thanks

Selam
Are there post schism saints in the Philokalia?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 04, 2010, 02:41:23 PM
I think there is a yet unpublished fifth volume in English, so it's probably inaccurate for guys like myself, who only read things translated into English, to say something like "I've read the Philokalia". If memory serves, there are indeed post-schism saints in the collection.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Get_Behind_Me_Satan on February 04, 2010, 03:58:34 PM
The Evergetinos published by CTOS and the Areana by Saint Ignatii.

AWESOME READ
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on February 04, 2010, 08:16:03 PM
After Nine Hundred Years by Fr. Yves Congar, O.P.

If you are looking for a balanced perspective towards the "Oriental Schism" of 1054 (his words), this is NOT the book to read.  Not only is this book blatantly unobjective and slanderous towards the Orthodox, even the "errors" of the Catholic Church he regards as to be something not as bad as what the Orthodox have done.  Steven Runciman and Francis Dvornik were much more balanced in their respective works on the schism (Runciman is a favorite author of mine).  Then again, this book is regarded as official Catholic teaching as it bears both the imprimatur and nihil obstat so maybe I shouldn't be too astonished.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on February 04, 2010, 08:37:29 PM
The Hobbit
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Jimmy on February 05, 2010, 12:22:54 AM
Harry Potter.  And The Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ, a collection of Maximus the Confessors writings.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Rafa999 on February 05, 2010, 12:36:40 AM
Great Book: The Temptation of St. Anthony by Flaubert

http://www.munseys.com/book/27397/Temptation_of_St_Antony,_The

Read it, it's really good.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Get_Behind_Me_Satan on February 09, 2010, 04:44:29 AM
Harry Potter.  And The Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ, a collection of Maximus the Confessors writings.

HARRY POTTER IS EVIL!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: PeterTheAleut on February 09, 2010, 04:45:02 AM
Harry Potter.  And The Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ, a collection of Maximus the Confessors writings.

HARRY POTTER IS EVIL!!!!!!!!!!!!!
1.  Who told you this?
2.  Why do you believe him?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on February 09, 2010, 11:10:56 AM
Harry Potter.  And The Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ, a collection of Maximus the Confessors writings.

HARRY POTTER IS EVIL!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I agree 100%. But be aware that saying such things will bring you much grief around here. But I'm with you, and I respect you for stating the truth.


Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Rosehip on February 09, 2010, 11:24:15 AM
Harry Potter.  And The Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ, a collection of Maximus the Confessors writings.

HARRY POTTER IS EVIL!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Nah, he's just a boring little boy, that's all. I was never struck by any particular evil, unless you call dull writing evil.  ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on February 09, 2010, 11:32:07 AM
HARRY POTTER IS EVIL!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Nah, he's just a boring little boy, that's all. I was never struck by any particular evil, unless you call dull writing evil.  ;)

Now this I'll agree with.  :P
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: scamandrius on February 09, 2010, 05:41:49 PM
The Eighth Kathisma of the Psalter.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 09, 2010, 05:58:43 PM
Harry Potter.  And The Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ, a collection of Maximus the Confessors writings.

HARRY POTTER IS EVIL!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I agree 100%. But be aware that saying such things will bring you much grief around here. But I'm with you, and I respect you for stating the truth.


Selam

 :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 09, 2010, 06:06:06 PM
Harry Potter.  And The Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ, a collection of Maximus the Confessors writings.

I'm due for my annual re-reading of the Harry Potter series. Probably do that as soon as I've had my fill of Vampires. I'm looking forward to the last HP book coming to the big screen.   :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 09, 2010, 06:09:01 PM
I'm due for my annual re-reading of the Harry Potter series. Probably do that as soon as I've had my fill of Vampires. I'm looking forward to the last HP book coming to the big screen.   :)

By chance, vampires... that sparkle?  ;D
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 09, 2010, 06:22:27 PM
I'm due for my annual re-reading of the Harry Potter series. Probably do that as soon as I've had my fill of Vampires. I'm looking forward to the last HP book coming to the big screen.   :)

By chance, vampires... that sparkle?  ;D

At the moment, any vampires will do, but the sparkly ones are high on the list of favourites! In recent months, I've read the Twilight series twice, the Sookie Stackhouse series, working my way through the Vampire Diaries, the Anita Blake Series and Cirque du Freak. I think I've seen every vampire film they had at the local video rental place, too and watched the TV versions of the Stackhouse books True Blood and The Vampire Diaries. All started with re-reading Dracula last year and mentioning it to a friend who recommended the Stackhouse books. I didn't realise there were so many Vampire books and series available! I'm having a great time! :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 09, 2010, 07:18:39 PM
Aside from my vampire reading, I've been enjoying as the mood takes me, anything by Dianna Wynne Jones, Fire and Hemlock being the latest. Also reading intermittently Thank God for Evolution, The Illness and Cure of the Soul in the Orthodox Tradition, Light from the East: Theology, Science and the Eastern Orthodox Tradition
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 09, 2010, 07:19:52 PM
Ahh, ok :) Mary seemed to like vampire-esque books as well. I never could get into them myself, but then I was never a big fiction reader. And the only vampire-themed movies that I watched were the low budget campy horror/comedies kind, such as Once Bitten and Fright Night.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 09, 2010, 07:34:37 PM
Ahh, ok :) Mary seemed to like vampire-esque books as well. I never could get into them myself, but then I was never a big fiction reader. And the only vampire-themed movies that I watched were the low budget campy horror/comedies kind, such as Once Bitten and Fright Night.

I haven't seen either of those films; I suppose because of an unconscious preference to keep comedy and horror separate. Anything Vampiric should be, for the main, serious stuff!  ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Rafa999 on February 10, 2010, 12:37:58 AM
I....would not read anything having to do with vampires, ghosts, harry potter, etc. I think that stuff attracts too much negative energy, I'm in fact getting rid of some books on ghost stories I have soon enough. I read that many of the names used in Harry Potter are the names of demons by the way. Why would you want to call on demons? That book is a practical guide on conducting witchcraft (Harry potter is).

Quote
Also, many of those who had practiced magic brought their books together and burned them in the sight of all. And they counted up the value of them, and it totaled fifty thousand pieces of silver.

Acts 19:19

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on February 10, 2010, 01:11:48 PM
I....would not read anything having to do with vampires, ghosts, harry potter, etc. I think that stuff attracts too much negative energy, I'm in fact getting rid of some books on ghost stories I have soon enough. I read that many of the names used in Harry Potter are the names of demons by the way. Why would you want to call on demons? That book is a practical guide on conducting witchcraft (Harry potter is).

Quote
Also, many of those who had practiced magic brought their books together and burned them in the sight of all. And they counted up the value of them, and it totaled fifty thousand pieces of silver.

Acts 19:19
That's utterly riddikulus.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on February 10, 2010, 02:25:54 PM
That's utterly riddikulus.

St. Anthony's says beware!

(http://www.stanthonysmonastery.org/ccp6/media/ccp0/prodlg/Harrylg.gif)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on February 10, 2010, 02:53:14 PM
That's utterly riddikulus.

St. Anthony's says beware!

(http://www.stanthonysmonastery.org/ccp6/media/ccp0/prodlg/Harrylg.gif)

This forum, if nothing else, is always good for a good chuckle.  :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 10, 2010, 04:45:32 PM
That's utterly riddikulus.

St. Anthony's says beware!

(http://www.stanthonysmonastery.org/ccp6/media/ccp0/prodlg/Harrylg.gif)

This forum, if nothing else, is always good for a good chuckle.  :laugh:

 :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 10, 2010, 04:46:55 PM
That's utterly riddikulus.

St. Anthony's says beware!

(http://www.stanthonysmonastery.org/ccp6/media/ccp0/prodlg/Harrylg.gif)

If St Anthony's are in the habit of putting out that kind of rubbish, perhaps people should beware St Anthony's. ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on February 10, 2010, 04:50:55 PM
This forum, if nothing else, is always good for a good chuckle.  :laugh:
Yeah. The funniest part? The kids don't read Harry Potter anymore. I haven't seen any of my students reading them since Twilight was released.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on February 10, 2010, 04:53:08 PM
If St Anthony's are in the habit of putting out that kind of rubbish, perhaps people should beware St Anthony's. ;)

No, don't be discouraged.  Their other publications are really wonderful.  I especially recommend Counsels from the Holy Mountain:

Selected from the letters and homilies of Elder Ephraim
and Monastic Wisdom: The Letters of Elder Joseph the Hesychast.  The hardcover editions are gorgeous, and both are around $20.00 apiece.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on February 10, 2010, 04:54:27 PM
Yeah. The funniest part? The kids don't read Harry Potter anymore. I haven't seen any of my students reading them since Twilight was released.

That's because the fad is over, just like every other one.  If you really hate something that much in pop culture, all you have to do is wait it out.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: ytterbiumanalyst on February 10, 2010, 04:56:42 PM
Yeah. The funniest part? The kids don't read Harry Potter anymore. I haven't seen any of my students reading them since Twilight was released.

That's because the fad is over, just like every other one.  If you really hate something that much in pop culture, all you have to do is wait it out.
Absolutely true.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 10, 2010, 08:59:44 PM
This forum, if nothing else, is always good for a good chuckle.  :laugh:
Yeah. The funniest part? The kids don't read Harry Potter anymore. I haven't seen any of my students reading them since Twilight was released.

My younger granddaughter has just discovered Twilight. When I was reading the books last year, she was good-naturedly mocking me for enjoying them so much. She had succumbed to the negativity of some internet friends about the books; a little disappointing because I have always encouraged my offspring and their offspring to think for themselves. ;) Anyway, I only had to wait until a neigbourhood girl asked her to go to see New Moon with her during the holidays. As granddaughter hadn't seen the first film, she spent the afternoon over at the girl's house watching Twilight and then trundled off to the pictures with her friend. She came back home completely excited, wanting to borrow the books from me and wondering why she hadn't done so in the first place. Nannas rule! :laugh:
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Alveus Lacuna on February 11, 2010, 02:39:05 AM
Just started:

(http://us.penguingroup.com/static/covers/all/9/6/9780140435269H.jpg)

Early Christian Lives


"These pioneering Lives are central sources for the major Christian monastic figures from St Antony, who died in 356, to St Benedict (c. 480-547). They also shed light on the beliefs and values of their celebrated authors. Athanasius' Life of Antony reveals the man who many believe was the first to set out into the Egyptian desert to pursue the path of poverty, abstinence and solitary prayer. St Jerome fought for the cause of chastity and asceticism in writing about Paul of Thebes, Hilarion and Malchus, while in his Life of Martin Sulpicius Severus described the achievements of a man who combined the roles of monk, bishop and missionary. Almost two hundred years later, Pope Gregory the Great in his Dialogues focused above all on St Benedict, whose Rule became the template for every subsequent form of monasticism. Full of vivid incidents and astonishing miracles, all these works proved hugely popular and influential and also inspired much of the visual imagery of the Middle Ages."

http://us.penguingroup.com/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780140435269,00.html?Early_Christian_Lives_Carolinne_White#
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on February 11, 2010, 06:22:48 PM
Just started:

(http://us.penguingroup.com/static/covers/all/9/6/9780140435269H.jpg)

Early Christian Lives


"These pioneering Lives are central sources for the major Christian monastic figures from St Antony, who died in 356, to St Benedict (c. 480-547). They also shed light on the beliefs and values of their celebrated authors. Athanasius' Life of Antony reveals the man who many believe was the first to set out into the Egyptian desert to pursue the path of poverty, abstinence and solitary prayer. St Jerome fought for the cause of chastity and asceticism in writing about Paul of Thebes, Hilarion and Malchus, while in his Life of Martin Sulpicius Severus described the achievements of a man who combined the roles of monk, bishop and missionary. Almost two hundred years later, Pope Gregory the Great in his Dialogues focused above all on St Benedict, whose Rule became the template for every subsequent form of monasticism. Full of vivid incidents and astonishing miracles, all these works proved hugely popular and influential and also inspired much of the visual imagery of the Middle Ages."

http://us.penguingroup.com/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780140435269,00.html?Early_Christian_Lives_Carolinne_White#

I was just reading the other day in the Ethiopian Synaxarium about Abba Paul of Thebes, who may have preceded St. Anthony in fleeing the world and pursuing the ascetic life. St. Anthony thought he was the first until Our Lord revealed to him that Abba Paul was already living in the desert. It also talks about their relationship with St. Athanasius. Fascinating. You can read about it here, beginning with the second paragraph: http://www.stmichaeleoc.org/Synaxarium/Yekatit_02.htm


Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on February 11, 2010, 06:55:54 PM
That's utterly riddikulus.

St. Anthony's says beware!

(http://www.stanthonysmonastery.org/ccp6/media/ccp0/prodlg/Harrylg.gif)

If St Anthony's are in the habit of putting out that kind of rubbish, perhaps people should beware St Anthony's. ;)

 How do we know it's rubbish?  I haven't read it and I don't know anyone else who has read it.  Is it rubbish if it poo poo's something we like?  I guess that would explain all the Bible's collecting dust.  :-\
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on February 11, 2010, 07:00:28 PM
How do we know it's rubbish?  I haven't read it and I don't know anyone else who has read it.  Is it rubbish if it poo poo's something we like?  I guess that would explain all the Bible's collecting dust.  :-\
http://www.philokalia.org/PDF/potter.pdf

Believe me, it is rubbish of the highest order.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on February 11, 2010, 07:13:21 PM
How do we know it's rubbish?  I haven't read it and I don't know anyone else who has read it.  Is it rubbish if it poo poo's something we like?  I guess that would explain all the Bible's collecting dust.  :-\
http://www.philokalia.org/PDF/potter.pdf

Believe me, it is rubbish of the highest order.

 Interesting.  Thanks for the link.  All I know is that an overwhelming amount of folks I know who read HP and the Twilight series don't go to church, don't believe in church and don't believe in the devil.  Read what you want, but If you lay down with dogs, you get up with flees.  :)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 11, 2010, 07:17:41 PM
That's utterly riddikulus.

St. Anthony's says beware!

(http://www.stanthonysmonastery.org/ccp6/media/ccp0/prodlg/Harrylg.gif)

If St Anthony's are in the habit of putting out that kind of rubbish, perhaps people should beware St Anthony's. ;)

 How do we know it's rubbish?  I haven't read it and I don't know anyone else who has read it.  Is it rubbish if it poo poo's something we like?  I guess that would explain all the Bible's collecting dust.  :-\

I've read it and written a refutation which I intended to blog before moving countries. It's not even good rubbish where one could admire scholarly research which simply comes to an incorrect conclusion. It's inaccurate, untruthful and it makes unfounded claims against the author.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on February 11, 2010, 07:22:09 PM


 It's inaccurate, untruthful and it makes unfounded claims against the author.

 But as far as I know, you're making unfounded claims against this book by St. Anthony's.  :-\
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Papist on February 11, 2010, 07:22:59 PM
The Eye of the World - Robert Jordan
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on February 11, 2010, 07:28:42 PM
Interesting.  Thanks for the link.  All I know is that an overwhelming amount of folks I know who read HP and the Twilight series don't go to church, don't believe in church and don't believe in the devil.  Read what you want, but If you lay down with dogs, you get up with flees.  :)

An overwhelming amount of people I know who breathe a nitrogen/oxygen blend and drink water 'don't go to church, don't believe in church and don't believe in the devil'.  ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 11, 2010, 07:33:49 PM


 It's inaccurate, untruthful and it makes unfounded claims against the author.

 But as far as I know, you're making unfounded claims against this book by St. Anthony's.  :-\

Well, fortunately, I know different. ;) And why not take it up with Nebelpfade, too, who claims it's rubbish of the highest order? Isn't he making (as far as you know) unfounded claims against this book by St Anthony's - and asking you to believe him? Why make an issue with me?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: soufliotiki on February 11, 2010, 08:12:57 PM
With the start of Cheesefare week I started:

'Father Seraphim Rose, His Life and Works', Hieromonk Damascene.

This will be my Great Lent book ... it is certainly large enough for me to work through his biography and get to his works in time for the more serious end of the Great Fast.

Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 11, 2010, 08:34:31 PM
How do we know it's rubbish?  I haven't read it and I don't know anyone else who has read it.  Is it rubbish if it poo poo's something we like?  I guess that would explain all the Bible's collecting dust.  :-\
http://www.philokalia.org/PDF/potter.pdf

Believe me, it is rubbish of the highest order.

 Interesting.  Thanks for the link.  All I know is that an overwhelming amount of folks I know who read HP and the Twilight series don't go to church, don't believe in church and don't believe in the devil.  Read what you want, but If you lay down with dogs, you get up with flees.  :)

All I know is that all the people I know who read the HP books and the Twilight series do go to Church, do believe in God and church, and do believe in the devil. All of them are committed Christians as is Harry Potter's author. Read what you want, but if you lay down with dogs, you get up with fleas. Perhaps we should warn the folks that you know. ;)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Gebre Menfes Kidus on February 11, 2010, 08:46:37 PM
With the start of Cheesefare week I started:

'Father Seraphim Rose, His Life and Works', Hieromonk Damascene.

This will be my Great Lent book ... it is certainly large enough for me to work through his biography and get to his works in time for the more serious end of the Great Fast.



A wonderful book! There are some dry spots along the way, but the majority of it is absolutely edifying.


Selam
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: soufliotiki on February 11, 2010, 08:50:49 PM
With the start of Cheesefare week I started: 'Father Seraphim Rose, His Life and Works', Hieromonk Damascene.

This will be my Great Lent book ... it is certainly large enough for me to work through his biography and get to his works in time for the more serious end of the Great Fast.

A wonderful book! There are some dry spots along the way, but the majority of it is absolutely edifying.
Selam

Thanks Selam, so far I am finding it awesome ... what parts did you find dry? Personally, I am finding the exposition into his early life and thoughts extremally enlightening ... there is an element of regret inside me that my own life has not taken into account so many other people and cultures around me ... having lived in a sheltered and protected culture my knowledge of other people has been limited.

It is only now that I am finding out about God's Creation ... Fr Seraphim's journey shows me into the hearts of people who are foreign to me ... it is almost awakening a desire in me to meet people other than those who I have known for the last 34 years. His progression through philosophy, Hinduism, Buddhism and all the other oriental mystical religions is inspiring! He learnt an entire language (Chinese) so as to understand the culture better!

What was your favourite part of the book (bare in mind I am only up to Chapter 10 and my rule is one chapter a day during my afternoon coffee hour) ... ?
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Asteriktos on February 11, 2010, 08:55:50 PM
A wonderful book!

I agree. So now you can't say that I never agreed with you on something.  8)
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: GabrieltheCelt on February 11, 2010, 08:59:08 PM


 It's inaccurate, untruthful and it makes unfounded claims against the author.

 But as far as I know, you're making unfounded claims against this book by St. Anthony's.  :-\

Well, fortunately, I know different. ;)
But I don't, so you'll have to forgive me for not accepting your criticism.

And why not take it up with Nebelpfade, too, who claims it's rubbish of the highest order? Isn't he making (as far as you know) unfounded claims against this book by St Anthony's - and asking you to believe him? Why make an issue with me?
Nebelpfade did us a courtesy by providing us with a link to the book so that we could see for ourselves.  Maybe you didn't know about such a link and that's one thing.  But it's obvious that you really enjoy the HP and Twilight books.  Fine by me, seriously.  I get upset if someone attacks my interests as well.  But, all you've done is allude to some mysterious inside knowledge the rest of us don't have by saying, "I know different."  OK, that's cool.  I just wanted you to share it with the rest of us as well.  I don't think that's asking too much.  But I will say this; when it comes to having an intimate knowledge of what is and isn't dangerous to our souls, I listen to everyone but come down on the side of our monastics.  
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Riddikulus on February 11, 2010, 09:47:03 PM


 It's inaccurate, untruthful and it makes unfounded claims against the author.

 But as far as I know, you're making unfounded claims against this book by St. Anthony's.  :-\

Well, fortunately, I know different. ;)
But I don't, so you'll have to forgive me for not accepting your criticism.

And why not take it up with Nebelpfade, too, who claims it's rubbish of the highest order? Isn't he making (as far as you know) unfounded claims against this book by St Anthony's - and asking you to believe him? Why make an issue with me?
Nebelpfade did us a courtesy by providing us with a link to the book so that we could see for ourselves.  Maybe you didn't know about such a link and that's one thing.  But it's obvious that you really enjoy the HP and Twilight books.  Fine by me, seriously.  I get upset if someone attacks my interests as well.  But, all you've done is allude to some mysterious inside knowledge the rest of us don't have by saying, "I know different."  OK, that's cool.  I just wanted you to share it with the rest of us as well.  I don't think that's asking too much.  But I will say this; when it comes to having an intimate knowledge of what is and isn't dangerous to our souls, I listen to everyone but come down on the side of our monastics.  

I don't have any mysterious inside knowledge at all; merely knowledge of the HP books and knowledge that what the St Anthony's booklet says is rubbish of the highest order. (I had actually forgotten about the link to the booklet) And why would you assume that I'm "upset by anyone attacking my interests"? What have emotions to do with this? What I am commenting on is poor scholarship which amounts to nothing more than puerile rubbish out of ignorance or avoidance of the facts. I'm sure that you realise that there is a big difference between having knowledge of something and disagreeing with it and having no knowledge of something and using monastery status to convince people to agree with a biased position. If you wish to believe that all information provided by monastics is of merit, that is of course your prerogative. But I know piffle when I see it.
Title: Re: What is everyone reading?
Post by: Entscheidungsproblem on February 11, 2010, 09:50:37 PM