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Foreign Language Forums => Foreign Languages Forum => Topic started by: augustin717 on November 22, 2010, 08:39:56 PM

Title: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: augustin717 on November 22, 2010, 08:39:56 PM
http://www.crestinortodox.ro/cantari-bisericesti-audio-mp3/sfanta-liturghie-limba-tiganeasca/ (http://www.crestinortodox.ro/cantari-bisericesti-audio-mp3/sfanta-liturghie-limba-tiganeasca/)
The Gypsies are a people whose history has been  often linked to the Orthodox Church over the last 700 years at least, but possibly more.
Within the Romanian Patriarchate the liturgy is performed in their language, as well.
Title: Re: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: biro on November 22, 2010, 08:47:10 PM
Thanks for posting!   :)
Title: Re: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: Cymbyz on November 23, 2010, 09:39:05 PM
Is the text of the Liturgy in Romany available?
Title: Re: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: ialmisry on November 23, 2010, 10:21:24 PM
Is the text of the Liturgy in Romany available?
Not that I know of online, but you can listen to it:
http://www.crestinortodox.ro/cantari-bisericesti-audio-mp3/sfanta-liturghie-limba-tiganeasca/
Title: Re: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: podkarpatska on November 24, 2010, 12:04:58 AM
In the 1970's there was a cheesy Hollywood movie titled "King of the Gypsies." http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0077807/  A little bit of Orthodox trivia is in order. At the time, now Metropolitan Nicholas of ACROD was the pastor of St. Nicholas Orthodox Church located on 2nd Avenue in the East Village of New York City.  A funeral scene was shot at the church and the then-Father Nicholas had an uncredited role as the priest presiding at the funeral. I think that the burial scenes were shot across the East River at a cemetery in Linden, NJ where there is a large Roma section. Three bar crosses are evident there in abundance. The Roma section is near the St. Nicholas and St. Mary Orthodox Section (Elizabeth and Bayonne, NJ parishes) where all of my grandparents, my brother and many family members are now buried. The Roma families would gather on Sundays and picnic on summer Sunday afternoons by the graves of their family. When we would take my grandfather to visit the family graves after liturgy, we would always pass through the Roma section and my grandfather would always say the same thing in Rusyn and laugh. I am not sure what he said, but I suspect it wasn't nice. Anyway, the Orthodox Church in Slovakia is to be commended for its work with Roma orphans at its orphanage in Medzilaborce, the home town of the family of the artist Andy Warhol near the Ukrainian border.
Title: Re: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: Jetavan on December 08, 2012, 01:16:42 PM
If the Roma appeared in Europe around 500 CE, then that would be only a hundred years after the Huns had arrived. Did the Roma somehow associate themselves with the Huns?

Romany Were European 500 Years Earlier Than Previously Thought (http://rendezvous.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/08/scientists-romany-were-european-500-years-earlier-than-previously-thought/)

LONDON — The Romany people constitute Europe’s largest and, arguably, now its most persecuted minority.

A new genetic study published this week suggests their ancestors arrived in Europe from northwestern India in a single wave around 1,500 years ago, half a millennium earlier than previously thought.

The international authors of the peer-reviewed paper in Current Biology journal said their study is the most comprehensive ever of the demographic history of the Romany. They said it reveals the origins of a people who “constitute a mosaic of languages, religions, and lifestyles while sharing a distinct social heritage.”

Scientific American noted that earlier studies of the Romany language and cursory analysis of genetic patterns had determined India was the group’s place of origin. But the new study points to a single migration from northwestern India around 500 CE.
Title: Re: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: gypsyjohn on February 20, 2014, 10:31:50 AM
The gypsy community are now turning to Protestant churches such as the light and light missions in the UK.They feel they are not wanted or have nothing to again from orthodoxy.I feel the church has a duty for God to minester  the truth faith of Christ to my people.

Yours in Christ
Title: Re: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: gypsyjohn on February 20, 2014, 10:47:06 AM
There is a Orthodox mission in Windsor, UK if you know anyone interested tell them about it.Its all in English st James liturgy.www.orthodoxwindsor.co.uk

Date and time~Saturday 9:30am, February 22nd

Address~St Andrew's Church of England
 Mill Lane,
Windsor,
Berkshire
 SL4 5JH
Title: Re: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: Alpo on February 20, 2014, 12:21:22 PM
The Gypsies are a people whose history has been  often linked to the Orthodox Church over the last 700 years at least, but possibly more.

Cool. I didn't know that. AFAIK Finnish gypsies tend to be Pentecostals.
Title: Re: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: IoanC on February 20, 2014, 12:28:23 PM
I like the chanting. I wonder if it's in a certain dialect. I seem to remember a gypsy friend of mine told me there were several dialects even in Romania.
Title: Re: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: Cymbyz on February 20, 2014, 02:10:03 PM
It's probably Vlach Romany, since the recording was made in Romania by Romanians.
Title: Re: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: augustin717 on February 20, 2014, 02:34:30 PM
The Gypsies are a people whose history has been  often linked to the Orthodox Church over the last 700 years at least, but possibly more.

Cool. I didn't know that. AFAIK Finnish gypsies tend to be Pentecostals.
That's a newer trend for sure. It also exists in Romania to an extent that's quite visible, but historically the Gypsies have adopted the religion of the majority population . So where they lived with the Orthodox Romanians they were and still are, for the most part, Orthodox. Although oftentimes they suffer all sorts of discrimination and prejudice even from the clergy.
Title: Re: The Liturgy in Rromanes (Gypsy language):
Post by: KostaC on June 28, 2015, 04:27:40 PM
Could the dialect used to celebrate this particular Divine Liturgy be understood by the Roma in Greece? I've recently really wanted to better understand the Roma of Greece (I still don't the distinction in the Greek languages between two Roma groups), and I feel like resources in the Roma language for Roma Orthodox-Christians (who are stereotyped as being more devout than ethnic Greeks; the no. 1 example is on the Feast of the Dormition on the island of Tinos where most celebrants are said to be Roma) is a great thing. A friend of mine knows a priest from the west side of Thessaloniki who is fairly well-known in the Gypsy community because he helps shuttle kids between their homes & school. Maybe my friend could pass these resources on. The worst thing the priest can say is «όχι ευχαριστώ, παλικάρι μου. Προτιμάει την ελληνική γλώσσα το ποίμνιό μου»./"no thanks, kid; my flock prefers Greek." I'd also like to hear the Roma language, so this recording'll be cool to listen to. So far, all I know is the word «μπαλαμός». That means "non-Gypsy," & I've been told it means "White man."

Oh, also, I've seen a video online of an Eastern Catholic parish in Hungary made up of Roma. The priest himself I think was either all Magyar or half-Romanian/half-Roma, and he introduced guitars & a band into the choir. I mean it was kind of weird to my eyes & ears, but if it brings in the faithful, why not?