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Author Topic: Homeschool VS Public School  (Read 65766 times) Average Rating: 1
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« Reply #270 on: July 22, 2009, 06:40:53 PM »

Do you really believe that secular government produces better "qualified" teachers than the Christian community can produce? Do you really believe that the only authentic "diversity" is to be found in the cauldron of public education?

Yes, and yes.

With all due respect, your statement smacks of condescension and elitism.

I am an elitist.
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« Reply #271 on: July 22, 2009, 06:49:20 PM »

Do you really believe that secular government produces better "qualified" teachers than the Christian community can produce? Do you really believe that the only authentic "diversity" is to be found in the cauldron of public education?

Yes, and yes.

With all due respect, your statement smacks of condescension and elitism.

I am an elitist.


Well personally I think you are far too intelligent to remain an elitist. Stop trying to prove yourself with pseudo intellectual posturing; you can stand on your own reasoning ability and sound moral convictions. Perhaps I am wrong about you, but I give you too much credit to dismiss you as merely another intellectual poseur. Wink

Selam
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« Reply #272 on: July 22, 2009, 06:53:47 PM »

Do you really believe that secular government produces better "qualified" teachers than the Christian community can produce? Do you really believe that the only authentic "diversity" is to be found in the cauldron of public education?

Yes, and yes.

With all due respect, your statement smacks of condescension and elitism.

I am an elitist.


Well personally I think you are far too intelligent to remain an elitist. Stop trying to prove yourself with pseudo intellectual posturing; you can stand on your own reasoning ability and sound moral convictions. Perhaps I am wrong about you, but I give you too much credit to dismiss you as merely another intellectual poseur. Wink

Selam

The discussion is not actually about me, and you have no grounds to accuse me in posing or pretending. I really am a "leftie," a liberal (maybe socialist), and a convinced elitist. I believe in an elite, to which professional teachers must belong. Also there are elite doctors, engineers, scientists, writers, philosophers, artists, musicians, etc. Those are my beliefs, my convictions, for all they are worth. Nothing of that is a pose.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2009, 06:55:49 PM by Heorhij » Logged

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« Reply #273 on: July 22, 2009, 08:39:42 PM »

George,

How can you be an elitist, one who elevates himself above others based on his personal views of what is or is not valuable, and have the love of Christ in you? Even your posts have the phrase "love never fails" at the end. An academic is no better in value to his Creator than one who left a personally beneficial career to raise his or her own God given children. A doctor is no more important to his Creator than a bum under a bridge-in fact Christ came to save the lost, as in the "worst" of the "worst" people were who he sought out. Where in Orthodox theology is it taught that we elevate ourselves over others, especially based on things as finite as our earthly careers?

I guess I am not following either your tendency toward statism, though I know that is what you came from, nor your feelings of elitism. All you have in this entire thread is your feeling that people that went to college to be teachers are far more incredibly intelligent and qualified to teach children than the child's own parents. We have a scriptural mandate to teach our children, and the freedom to decide how to go about that.(at least we do this week, who knows what the mighty O will do to us next week) We WILL answer for how we went about it. At the very least, by your title of "liberal" you should 'liberally' allow the freedom of choice to all your fellow citizens. Its is more accurate to say you are a "statist" if you believe only the state has the right to educate a citizen, and only in the way they see fit, regardless of the citizen's or citizen's parents' beliefs.  Angry
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« Reply #274 on: July 22, 2009, 10:10:28 PM »

I don't believe Heorhij is equating the elite with an "I'm better than you" attitude.  I interpreted this to mean that there are people who, through education and training, are better qualified to do a certain job.  I would much rather go to a cardiologist if I had a heart problem than to go to a secretary at the front desk of the clinic.  It makes sense to have people who have been trained with the latest research and technology to teach children.  If anyone, as a parent, has equivalent training or is willing to take on the burden of acquiring the knowledge and skills to teach at home, that's great.  I don't think, however, that every parent is a good candidate to try home school. 

Having said that, please please please let's get this back on topic.  There are too many people taking this subject far too personally.  If someone believes that homeschooling is not appropriate, it's not an affront on your intelligence personally.  It is, after all, an opinion.  If you feel that homeschooling is beneficial to your child and it is the right path then continue to pursue it!  If public schooling is the better option, then do it!  In any case, I implore everyone posting to please stay on topic and if you find that participating in the discussion is causing you to be angry, then please step back and consider your words before you post.  Thank you.
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« Reply #275 on: July 22, 2009, 11:44:50 PM »

Do you really believe that secular government produces better "qualified" teachers than the Christian community can produce? Do you really believe that the only authentic "diversity" is to be found in the cauldron of public education?

Yes, and yes.

With all due respect, your statement smacks of condescension and elitism.

I am an elitist.


Well personally I think you are far too intelligent to remain an elitist. Stop trying to prove yourself with pseudo intellectual posturing; you can stand on your own reasoning ability and sound moral convictions. Perhaps I am wrong about you, but I give you too much credit to dismiss you as merely another intellectual poseur. Wink

Selam

The discussion is not actually about me, and you have no grounds to accuse me in posing or pretending. I really am a "leftie," a liberal (maybe socialist), and a convinced elitist. I believe in an elite, to which professional teachers must belong. Also there are elite doctors, engineers, scientists, writers, philosophers, artists, musicians, etc. Those are my beliefs, my convictions, for all they are worth. Nothing of that is a pose.

Dear friend,

Please read my words carefully. Far from accusing you of anything, I actually complimented your intelligence and said that I don't dismiss you as a poseur. You are also right that this thread is not about you, but you interjected yourself into the discussion when you said, "I am an elitist."

But to get back on topic, please stop making the philosophical error of promoting the false dichotomy between "faith" and "education."

Selam
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« Reply #276 on: July 23, 2009, 02:11:25 PM »


Quote
I don't believe Heorhij is equating the elite with an "I'm better than you" attitude.  I interpreted this to mean that there are people who, through education and training, are better qualified to do a certain job.  I would much rather go to a cardiologist if I had a heart problem than to go to a secretary at the front desk of the clinic.  It makes sense to have people who have been trained with the latest research and technology to teach children.  If anyone, as a parent, has equivalent training or is willing to take on the burden of acquiring the knowledge and skills to teach at home, that's great.  I don't think, however, that every parent is a good candidate to try home school. 
Maybe so. However there are those that have gone through training and education that can't add simple sums or spell or write a logical sentence. Have worked with them myself and so has dh. Via the 'whole language' approach to reading (a stupid format if I must say so) or lack of phonetic teaching, or lack of competent 'educated' math teachers. College education is not the vaccine to stupidity ppl think it is. Yes, I would rather go to a cardiologist if I had a heart issue, but then again I would want one that excelled at the top of his class rather than one that merely got his piece of sheepskin! And before that I would be doing all sorts of personal peremptory health care all along so that I would be less likely to need a heart specialist in the first place. I think that is the heart and soul of home education. We are not wards of the state, nor are our children. We weren't bought 'with a price' as the protestants are so fond of saying, just to be owned lock stock and barrel by our government! The 'research' into teaching children wavers and ebbs depending on who the latest self appointed experts happen to be. We can study a lot of things, and formulate the belief that our intellectual selves are far more enlightened and important than our nous. And yet we are taught to keep the mind in subjection to the spirit at all times, rather than elevating intellect above the spirit.  So educational elitism sits wrong with me. True, again I am the first to say hs'ing is not for everyone. However the choice should be as available as the choice of which college or vocational school to attend later on.
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« Reply #277 on: July 23, 2009, 02:22:23 PM »

So make your cardiologists excel. "You the people..."
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« Reply #278 on: July 23, 2009, 02:23:19 PM »

to get back on topic, please stop making the philosophical error of promoting the false dichotomy between "faith" and "education."

I didn't.
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« Reply #279 on: July 23, 2009, 05:37:21 PM »

So make your cardiologists excel. "You the people..."

This 'People" hires doctors, specialist, educators, trainers, musicians and other professionals to work for me. Not over me, not under me, but for me. If they cannot or will not, they are fired. So how do you suggest, in a given time limitation, ones makes anyone excel? What is your theory on this as an educator yourself?

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« Reply #280 on: July 23, 2009, 06:33:12 PM »

So make your cardiologists excel. "You the people..."

This 'People" hires doctors, specialist, educators, trainers, musicians and other professionals to work for me. Not over me, not under me, but for me. If they cannot or will not, they are fired. So how do you suggest, in a given time limitation, ones makes anyone excel? What is your theory on this as an educator yourself?



Improve public schools. Make school districts and boards hire only the best teachers for competitive salaries. There is no other way. You can fire a cardiologist, but then find a better cardiologist. You cannot fire a bad cardiologist and then do quadruple bypass yourself.
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« Reply #281 on: July 24, 2009, 12:44:12 AM »

So make your cardiologists excel. "You the people..."

This 'People" hires doctors, specialist, educators, trainers, musicians and other professionals to work for me. Not over me, not under me, but for me. If they cannot or will not, they are fired. So how do you suggest, in a given time limitation, ones makes anyone excel? What is your theory on this as an educator yourself?



Improve public schools. Make school districts and boards hire only the best teachers for competitive salaries. There is no other way. You can fire a cardiologist, but then find a better cardiologist. You cannot fire a bad cardiologist and then do quadruple bypass yourself.

Do you support school vouchers?

Selam
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« Reply #282 on: July 24, 2009, 08:21:49 AM »

Why not create Orthodox private schools?
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« Reply #283 on: July 24, 2009, 08:43:52 AM »

Why not create Orthodox private schools?

Some parishes/areas have done this successfully; some have done it, only to run into financial difficulties (not enough enrollment to sustain operations).  What I find amongst Greeks is either (a) why pay for school when I'm already paying for public education, or (b) if I'm going to pay, I'm going to pay for a private school with established results.  I've seen an Orthodox school with top-flight educators fail because people didn't want to take the chance (and now I honestly believe their children are getting a worse education - and that's beside the religious education aspect).
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« Reply #284 on: August 02, 2009, 08:39:13 PM »

. I am absolutely, terribly, vehemently anti-societal, anti-cultural. Maybe the heroes of the "Revolutionary Road" could be happy if they both found some community that would support them as they are, rather than cling to the "society" standards, I don't know...

I'm confused. Could you explain how you are "anti-societal, anti-cultural" but have no problem with society educating children, and are vehemently opposed to people who don't want society to educate their children and thus do it themselves. Letting society educate a child is pretty much ensuring their world will be whatever the predominant societal and cultural norms happen to be at the time, whether its from their teachers or fellow classmates.

Wouldn't it more accurate for you to say, "I am absolutely anti-societal, anti-cultural except for the formative first 18 years of a child's life in which case the primary responsibility for their education, and the majority of their world should be society."
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« Reply #285 on: August 02, 2009, 09:32:01 PM »

. I am absolutely, terribly, vehemently anti-societal, anti-cultural. Maybe the heroes of the "Revolutionary Road" could be happy if they both found some community that would support them as they are, rather than cling to the "society" standards, I don't know...

I'm confused. Could you explain how you are "anti-societal, anti-cultural" but have no problem with society educating children, and are vehemently opposed to people who don't want society to educate their children and thus do it themselves.

Because it's not the society that educates - it's either professionals, or amateurs.
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« Reply #286 on: August 02, 2009, 10:20:11 PM »

In order not to derail another thread I'm putting this here, regarding the idea the the average public school is some highly educated, intelligent, well-qualified professional. Written by Vox Day, a member of Mensa and author, the following is one big reason a smart, determined and dedicated home school parent can do a much better job educating their children than the average teacher.

"One argument often heard in defense of the public schools is that education is better left to those trained to teach, to the "professionals." Most teachers, after all, are required to have a college degree in education, and in many states they are forced to take tests purported to prove that they are not drooling idiots. Although one has to wonder what exactly is on those tests considering that after 59 percent of prospective teachers failed to pass the Massachusetts Teachers' Test in 1999, the test was assailed by FairTest, a teacher-run organization that opposes tests for teachers, in the following manner:

The MTT included many bizarre questions unlike those on any other state's teacher licensing exams. On one, candidates were asked to transcribe a portion of 'The Federalist Papers' as dictated from a low quality tape-recorder. Other items asked for dictionary definitions of words with questions such as "What is a preposition?" and "What is an adjective?"

Clearly, it is outrageous to expect public school teachers to know elementary grammar or be able to perform tasks that entry-level secretaries with two-year vo-tech degrees handle with ease."

"In 2001, the National Center for Education Statistics reported the average SAT score for intended education majors to be 481 math and 483 verbal. Only those interested in vocational school, home economics and public affairs scored lower.

But while the SAT is considered to be a generally reliable intelligence test, the 2001 SAT is not the same SAT that many of us took prior to attending university. Those 2001 scores on the 1996 SAT, which was replaced this year by the New SAT 2005, are equivalent to pre-1996 SAT scores of 451 math and 403 verbal. In case any education majors are reading this, 451 plus 403 equals a cumulative score of 854.

Examining an SAT-to-IQ conversion chart calculated from Mensa entrance criteria, a combined 854 indicates that the average IQ of those pursuing an education major is 91, nine points lower than the average IQ of 100. In other words, those who can't read teach whole language."
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« Reply #287 on: April 07, 2010, 07:34:53 AM »

Public schools are a good place for your kids to find meet the community. They also learn how to deal with other human beings and develop good social skills. Sorry to be antagonistic, but every homeschooled person I have ever met was incredibly awkward. School isn't pleasant for a lot of kids, but at least it teaches them how to deal with other human beings in the real world. Homeschooling is like wrapping your children in bubble-wrap.


{This response and following responses are in reply to this thread: http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,26775.0.html.  Please do not continue to debate Home VS Public schooling in that thread.  Thank you.  -- EofK, Family Forum Moderator}
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« Reply #288 on: April 07, 2010, 10:25:42 AM »

Public schools are a good place for your kids to find meet the community. They also learn how to deal with other human beings and develop good social skills. Sorry to be antagonistic, but every homeschooled person I have ever met was incredibly awkward. School isn't pleasant for a lot of kids, but at least it teaches them how to deal with other human beings in the real world. Homeschooling is like wrapping your children in bubble-wrap.

Of course, this is all anecdotal evidence so take it for what it's worth, but all the homeschooled kids that I have met seem exceptionally mature, well-informed, courteous and at ease with adults.
I suspect that whether or not to homeschool would have to be a decision, based on the local public schools and the individual child.
Btw, our parish has an Orthodox school which evolved out of a group of homeschooling mothers.
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« Reply #289 on: April 07, 2010, 11:48:19 AM »

Many home-schooled kids end up in special education when they enter public schools, because they are behind in various subjects. I don't say this to discourage home-schooling, but you need to know what you're doing. As for public schools, they may be good places for socializing, but they are also rife with secular propaganda and various unwholesome influences (whether from the students or the faculty). So I can understand why a Christian would want to homeschool his kid. Just make sure you know what you're doing, and that you have the time and skills necessary to give a good education.
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« Reply #290 on: April 07, 2010, 12:02:15 PM »

As I've said many times before, all teachers need to be held to the same standards, whether they work in a public school, a private school, or at home. Public school teachers have to pass a proficiency exam (Praxis series in many states, though the exact test varies) in order to be licensed. I would like to see home-schooling parents have the same requirement.
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« Reply #291 on: April 07, 2010, 12:26:08 PM »

As I've said many times before, all teachers need to be held to the same standards, whether they work in a public school, a private school, or at home. Public school teachers have to pass a proficiency exam (Praxis series in many states, though the exact test varies) in order to be licensed. I would like to see home-schooling parents have the same requirement.

Yet homeschoolers would argue that public school teachers are paid by the state and therefore should be subject to some sort of oversight.  Private school teachers are employed by non-state entities and their employees are, presumably, being vetted by a process.  Homeschoolers are not being employed by anyone.  If a homeschooled child can pass the same tests someone in a state school can, what is the difference? 
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« Reply #292 on: April 07, 2010, 12:28:32 PM »

Christi is risen!
Public schools are a good place for your kids to find meet the community. They also learn how to deal with other human beings and develop good social skills. Sorry to be antagonistic, but every homeschooled person I have ever met was incredibly awkward. School isn't pleasant for a lot of kids, but at least it teaches them how to deal with other human beings in the real world. Homeschooling is like wrapping your children in bubble-wrap.

Yeah, good place to meet the community and develop good social skills.
Quote
An eighth-grader in the Johnson County town of Joshua hanged himself over the weekend, and - like other recent child suicides - his death is being linked to bullying.

Jon Carmichael, a 13-year-old student at Loflin Middle School, committed suicide in a barn near his home, KDFW-TV (Channel 4) reports.

The boy's family says Jon was bullied at school, including being stuffed into a trash can during gym class.

The school district's superintendent told KTVT-TV (Channel 11) said he just heard about the trash can incident this week and that it's under investigation.

The boy's suicide follows the February hanging death of 9-year-old Montana Lance of The Colony, as well as the highly publicized Massachusetts case of a 15-year-old Irish girl who was bullied before hanging herself in January.
http://crimeblog.dallasnews.com/archives/2010/03/bullied-teen-commits-suicide-i.html
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« Reply #293 on: April 07, 2010, 12:29:43 PM »

As I've said many times before, all teachers need to be held to the same standards, whether they work in a public school, a private school, or at home. Public school teachers have to pass a proficiency exam (Praxis series in many states, though the exact test varies) in order to be licensed. I would like to see home-schooling parents have the same requirement.

Yet homeschoolers would argue that public school teachers are paid by the state and therefore should be subject to some sort of oversight.  Private school teachers are employed by non-state entities and their employees are, presumably, being vetted by a process.  Homeschoolers are not being employed by anyone.  If a homeschooled child can pass the same tests someone in a state school can, what is the difference? 

The Homeschooling parent is not part of the education cartel.
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« Reply #294 on: April 07, 2010, 12:59:21 PM »

As I've said many times before, all teachers need to be held to the same standards, whether they work in a public school, a private school, or at home. Public school teachers have to pass a proficiency exam (Praxis series in many states, though the exact test varies) in order to be licensed. I would like to see home-schooling parents have the same requirement.

Yet homeschoolers would argue that public school teachers are paid by the state and therefore should be subject to some sort of oversight.  Private school teachers are employed by non-state entities and their employees are, presumably, being vetted by a process.  Homeschoolers are not being employed by anyone.  If a homeschooled child can pass the same tests someone in a state school can, what is the difference? 
I'm not sure you're arguing the right argument here. I postulate that there is, or ought not to be, any difference. We regulate all kinds of other private businesses: Investors, whether part of a private firm or independent, are subject to SEC regulation. Farmers, whether working for a corporation or an independent farm, are subject to the USDA. Medical professionals, whether public, private, or independent, are subject to the state boards of health. Why then are not all educators subject to the state boards of education?

Now, the other issue you bring up, that of testing, is invalid already as it is asked, because public schools, private schools, and home-schools all issue different sets of tests.
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« Reply #295 on: April 07, 2010, 01:06:17 PM »

Yeah, good place to meet the community and develop good social skills.

Nice shock value. Did you know that some home schooled children have also committed suicide?

I'm going to echo some of the above sentiments and say that the I know a whole family that was home schooled that are good friends of mine, and they are total weirdos with no social skills.

That being said, most people that come out of public school can be said to be crass, materialist and hardly academically proficient in most areas, so I don't see how a bit of awkwardness is really that big of an issue.
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« Reply #296 on: April 07, 2010, 01:19:54 PM »

I think the anecdotal evidence of "weirdo homeschooled kids" is worthless, because for every homeschooled kid you drag out w/ poor social skills, I can drag out ten products of public AND private school education with the same problems.  I know because I'm probably one of them and I'm went to both private and public school.

The question is much bigger than that, though.  What exactly is the aim of our education system?  Is it to offer children the opportunity to learn about the world they live in or is it to create "good citizens"? 

I would imagine that people like MrY feel its the latter for the most part while homeschoolers would suggest the first is more important.

And let us not forget that the reason a public education system exists in this country is because those horrible Cat'licks started their own schools and the State just could not allow those dirty Irish and Italians offer a way for their children to get ahead of good Anglo-Americans. Wink
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« Reply #297 on: April 07, 2010, 01:21:33 PM »

As I've said many times before, all teachers need to be held to the same standards, whether they work in a public school, a private school, or at home. Public school teachers have to pass a proficiency exam (Praxis series in many states, though the exact test varies) in order to be licensed. I would like to see home-schooling parents have the same requirement.

Yet homeschoolers would argue that public school teachers are paid by the state and therefore should be subject to some sort of oversight.  Private school teachers are employed by non-state entities and their employees are, presumably, being vetted by a process.  Homeschoolers are not being employed by anyone.  If a homeschooled child can pass the same tests someone in a state school can, what is the difference?  
I'm not sure you're arguing the right argument here. I postulate that there is, or ought not to be, any difference. We regulate all kinds of other private businesses: Investors, whether part of a private firm or independent, are subject to SEC regulation. Farmers, whether working for a corporation or an independent farm, are subject to the USDA. Medical professionals, whether public, private, or independent, are subject to the state boards of health. Why then are not all educators subject to the state boards of education?

Now, the other issue you bring up, that of testing, is invalid already as it is asked, because public schools, private schools, and home-schools all issue different sets of tests.

The state also regulates the automotive mechanic industry as well as home improvement.  Should car and homeowners be subject to state oversight before their allowed to work on their cars and homes?  Note, this is not about eventually being subject to auto inspection or following zoning regulations (which I would equate to school testing), but about some sort of pseudo-professional license to work on one's car and/or home.
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« Reply #298 on: April 07, 2010, 01:29:04 PM »

Christ is risen!
Yeah, good place to meet the community and develop good social skills.

Nice shock value. Did you know that some home schooled children have also committed suicide?

And no doubt would have if they went to Public school as well. The home environment is another issue.


Quote
I'm going to echo some of the above sentiments and say that the I know a whole family that was home schooled that are good friends of mine, and they are total weirdos with no social skills.

That being said, most people that come out of public school can be said to be crass, materialist and hardly academically proficient in most areas, so I don't see how a bit of awkwardness is really that big of an issue.

Especially as many graduates of the public schools have no social skills.
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« Reply #299 on: April 07, 2010, 02:54:59 PM »

The question is much bigger than that, though.  What exactly is the aim of our education system?  Is it to offer children the opportunity to learn about the world they live in or is it to create "good citizens"? 

I would imagine that people like MrY feel its the latter for the most part while homeschoolers would suggest the first is more important.
Actually, I'd say the former. There is a lot in education that I feel is left over from the Cold War days. I wish we'd stop practices of indoctrination such as the Pledge of Allegiance and get on with the business of educating students about themselves (the arts) and their world (the sciences).

And let us not forget that the reason a public education system exists in this country is because those horrible Cat'licks started their own schools and the State just could not allow those dirty Irish and Italians offer a way for their children to get ahead of good Anglo-Americans. Wink
Very good point. I'm not against the private schools (my brother attended one) nor home-schooling (both my brother and I were home-schooled). But as it is, I cannot teach in a private school because they pay only half of what I make at a public school. The private schools around here either get those who have other means of earning a living, such as a spouse with a good income, or whose skills are subpar and therefore the public schools won't take them. I wish the private school teachers were all of the former category, but they're not. Equal licensing would go a long way toward equalising educational opportunities.
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« Reply #300 on: April 07, 2010, 03:58:24 PM »

The private schools in my area pay a great deal more than the public schools. So to borrow your often used phrase- don't generalize what all schools are like based upon the schools in your area. The middle/high school two blocks from me pays their teachers high 7 figures. The tuition (no including books, supplies and the REQUIRED laptop) is about $30,000 a year. If you compare private religious based schools to public schools you will find that a Catholic private school pays about 2/3 what public school does. But there are more non-religious private schools in my area than religious ones once you are in the k-12 range.
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« Reply #301 on: April 07, 2010, 05:20:18 PM »

The private schools in my area pay a great deal more than the public schools. So to borrow your often used phrase- don't generalize what all schools are like based upon the schools in your area. The middle/high school two blocks from me pays their teachers high 7 figures. The tuition (no including books, supplies and the REQUIRED laptop) is about $30,000 a year. If you compare private religious based schools to public schools you will find that a Catholic private school pays about 2/3 what public school does. But there are more non-religious private schools in my area than religious ones once you are in the k-12 range.
Yes, I understand that there are college prep schools that are doing quite well for themselves; I did not include them in my recommendation, because I do not think anything needs to be done. Should licensing become a requirement, most of those schools would experience no changes whatever; a lot of their teachers have doctorate degrees, and the ones who don't have a least a master's--hence the extraordinary cost. The private schools of which I speak are like the Catholic school you cite, which is typical across the country.
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« Reply #302 on: April 07, 2010, 05:26:10 PM »

There are virtually "college prep" preschool/grade schools here. Many of them require IQ tests for enrollment. Evergreen school in Shoreline is an example. You must score 95th precentile or higher in the WPPSI III to be considered for admission (age 4-5 to put things in perspective. Since if you want to enroll your child you have to submit IQ testing prior to consideration).  They offer preschool thru 8th grade and charge roughly $18,000 a year for pre-k. I don't know how many parents I saw "coaching" their 3-4 year olds so that they could score high IQ levels so they could try to enroll them at Evergreen once they turned 5.
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« Reply #303 on: June 20, 2010, 04:35:07 AM »

Although I'm a ways off from having children, I've come to looking up good places to send them when I do end up having them. What would be perfect would be for them to attend a Classic Christian school, which stresses the medieval Trivium system of education. The problem is, nearly all these schools demand that you be a Protestant in order to let your children attend. There are apparently a handful of exceptions, but they are the exception rather than the rule. And, of course, a majority of modern Catholic schools are jokes.

I don't understand the incredible shortage of Orthodox schools, when the rad-trad Catholics, who make up a smaller number overall than the Orthodox, have a greater volume of schools (at least, in terms of high schools).
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« Reply #304 on: July 02, 2010, 04:24:20 PM »

It has been a long time since I started this topic and some new things have come to my view through my grandchildren and younger children, now out of school. There have been new structures that have developed in my region since I last wrote.

We have had several other education opportunities develop in the public education sector; i will name them and explain them below:

A) Self Paced Public High School-  not all children in public high school are focused on social/school activities /sports along side of their high school education classes, some are focused on passing their tests and graduating as early as possible. In out town, the school board has opened such a school, called a leadership academy, it offers self-paced classes via a computer education (not unlike some Christian Schools using ABCA and other programs) the student takes classes via computer with Tutors in the class to assist them with questions or ideas that they may not understand. The School functions in 1/2 day schedules 6 days a week with no social/sport activities. The school offers a chance for students to take college level freshman classes for dual credit. The student "graduates" when state requirements of r class credits are met. As added incentive, if the student graduates when he would normally be in the 11th grade, he receives a scholarship from the school district to a state college or university for what would be their 12 th grade year.
My daughter graduated 4 months into her 11th years grade and went onto a neighboring community college with 12 college credits to her transcript.

b) Charter Schools - Charter Schools are public Schools funded with public money that address many of the needs and reasons that people go into a private school to reach. The classes seem to be smaller, the teachers  more devoted to helping their students succeed. To children with special needs, they have the same resources that public schools have but with fewer students and more intimacy. I have a grandson who is ADHD and bipolar who shined in the school. He was able to be self-paced and received the individual  attention that he needed. Many of these Charter Schools have Christian leadership that utilize  Christian Values and Ethics without forcing religious practice on the students. My daughter has found this to be a good option for her 3 sons.

As I have noted before, it is always the parents responsibility to assure that their children are being well educated spiritual andemotionally. Do not hesitate even in these settings to be active with your children , correct false teaching and assure that Orthodox Christian Teachings,, value , and world view are known and practiced by your children in your home and encourage them to take them out into the world and their schools.

Thomas
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« Reply #305 on: July 06, 2010, 11:11:33 AM »

It has been a long time since I started this topic and some new things have come to my view through my grandchildren and younger children, now out of school. There have been new structures that have developed in my region since I last wrote.

We have had several other education opportunities develop in the public education sector; i will name them and explain them below:

A) Self Paced Public High School-  not all children in public high school are focused on social/school activities /sports along side of their high school education classes, some are focused on passing their tests and graduating as early as possible. In out town, the school board has opened such a school, called a leadership academy, it offers self-paced classes via a computer education (not unlike some Christian Schools using ABCA and other programs) the student takes classes via computer with Tutors in the class to assist them with questions or ideas that they may not understand. The School functions in 1/2 day schedules 6 days a week with no social/sport activities. The school offers a chance for students to take college level freshman classes for dual credit. The student "graduates" when state requirements of r class credits are met. As added incentive, if the student graduates when he would normally be in the 11th grade, he receives a scholarship from the school district to a state college or university for what would be their 12 th grade year.
My daughter graduated 4 months into her 11th years grade and went onto a neighboring community college with 12 college credits to her transcript.

b) Charter Schools - Charter Schools are public Schools funded with public money that address many of the needs and reasons that people go into a private school to reach. The classes seem to be smaller, the teachers  more devoted to helping their students succeed. To children with special needs, they have the same resources that public schools have but with fewer students and more intimacy. I have a grandson who is ADHD and bipolar who shined in the school. He was able to be self-paced and received the individual  attention that he needed. Many of these Charter Schools have Christian leadership that utilize  Christian Values and Ethics without forcing religious practice on the students. My daughter has found this to be a good option for her 3 sons.

As I have noted before, it is always the parents responsibility to assure that their children are being well educated spiritual andemotionally. Do not hesitate even in these settings to be active with your children , correct false teaching and assure that Orthodox Christian Teachings,, value , and world view are known and practiced by your children in your home and encourage them to take them out into the world and their schools.

Thomas
There are also some great schools that are a blend between public and home schooling. For example, in my district we have a cyber academy. At this school students take all of their courses online, and these courses include vocabulary activities, lectures, outside websites, labs in which students usually manipulate variables online, homework/practice, journal activities, quizzes, and tests. Research shows that students who take online classes usually perform better than students who take traditional courses. These students at this school attend class two to three days a week at at school and the rest of the time they work from home. All of their work and learning is supported by a live teacher/advisor. This situation might be ideal for certain groups of kids.
Here is the website:
http://www.rrps.net/CyberAcademy/index.htm

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« Reply #306 on: July 06, 2010, 11:25:05 AM »

It has been a long time since I started this topic and some new things have come to my view through my grandchildren and younger children, now out of school. There have been new structures that have developed in my region since I last wrote.

We have had several other education opportunities develop in the public education sector; i will name them and explain them below:

A) Self Paced Public High School-  not all children in public high school are focused on social/school activities /sports along side of their high school education classes, some are focused on passing their tests and graduating as early as possible. In out town, the school board has opened such a school, called a leadership academy, it offers self-paced classes via a computer education (not unlike some Christian Schools using ABCA and other programs) the student takes classes via computer with Tutors in the class to assist them with questions or ideas that they may not understand. The School functions in 1/2 day schedules 6 days a week with no social/sport activities. The school offers a chance for students to take college level freshman classes for dual credit. The student "graduates" when state requirements of r class credits are met. As added incentive, if the student graduates when he would normally be in the 11th grade, he receives a scholarship from the school district to a state college or university for what would be their 12 th grade year.
My daughter graduated 4 months into her 11th years grade and went onto a neighboring community college with 12 college credits to her transcript.

b) Charter Schools - Charter Schools are public Schools funded with public money that address many of the needs and reasons that people go into a private school to reach. The classes seem to be smaller, the teachers  more devoted to helping their students succeed. To children with special needs, they have the same resources that public schools have but with fewer students and more intimacy. I have a grandson who is ADHD and bipolar who shined in the school. He was able to be self-paced and received the individual  attention that he needed. Many of these Charter Schools have Christian leadership that utilize  Christian Values and Ethics without forcing religious practice on the students. My daughter has found this to be a good option for her 3 sons.

As I have noted before, it is always the parents responsibility to assure that their children are being well educated spiritual andemotionally. Do not hesitate even in these settings to be active with your children , correct false teaching and assure that Orthodox Christian Teachings,, value , and world view are known and practiced by your children in your home and encourage them to take them out into the world and their schools.

Thomas
There are also some great schools that are a blend between public and home schooling. For example, in my district we have a cyber academy. At this school students take all of their courses online, and these courses include vocabulary activities, lectures, outside websites, labs in which students usually manipulate variables online, homework/practice, journal activities, quizzes, and tests. Research shows that students who take online classes usually perform better than students who take traditional courses. These students at this school attend class two to three days a week at at school and the rest of the time they work from home. All of their work and learning is supported by a live teacher/advisor. This situation might be ideal for certain groups of kids.
Here is the website:
http://www.rrps.net/CyberAcademy/index.htm



that program sounds incredibly interesting.  were it available when i was in high school, i would have gladly taken it!
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« Reply #307 on: July 06, 2010, 11:26:13 AM »

It has been a long time since I started this topic and some new things have come to my view through my grandchildren and younger children, now out of school. There have been new structures that have developed in my region since I last wrote.

We have had several other education opportunities develop in the public education sector; i will name them and explain them below:

A) Self Paced Public High School-  not all children in public high school are focused on social/school activities /sports along side of their high school education classes, some are focused on passing their tests and graduating as early as possible. In out town, the school board has opened such a school, called a leadership academy, it offers self-paced classes via a computer education (not unlike some Christian Schools using ABCA and other programs) the student takes classes via computer with Tutors in the class to assist them with questions or ideas that they may not understand. The School functions in 1/2 day schedules 6 days a week with no social/sport activities. The school offers a chance for students to take college level freshman classes for dual credit. The student "graduates" when state requirements of r class credits are met. As added incentive, if the student graduates when he would normally be in the 11th grade, he receives a scholarship from the school district to a state college or university for what would be their 12 th grade year.
My daughter graduated 4 months into her 11th years grade and went onto a neighboring community college with 12 college credits to her transcript.

b) Charter Schools - Charter Schools are public Schools funded with public money that address many of the needs and reasons that people go into a private school to reach. The classes seem to be smaller, the teachers  more devoted to helping their students succeed. To children with special needs, they have the same resources that public schools have but with fewer students and more intimacy. I have a grandson who is ADHD and bipolar who shined in the school. He was able to be self-paced and received the individual  attention that he needed. Many of these Charter Schools have Christian leadership that utilize  Christian Values and Ethics without forcing religious practice on the students. My daughter has found this to be a good option for her 3 sons.

As I have noted before, it is always the parents responsibility to assure that their children are being well educated spiritual andemotionally. Do not hesitate even in these settings to be active with your children , correct false teaching and assure that Orthodox Christian Teachings,, value , and world view are known and practiced by your children in your home and encourage them to take them out into the world and their schools.

Thomas
There are also some great schools that are a blend between public and home schooling. For example, in my district we have a cyber academy. At this school students take all of their courses online, and these courses include vocabulary activities, lectures, outside websites, labs in which students usually manipulate variables online, homework/practice, journal activities, quizzes, and tests. Research shows that students who take online classes usually perform better than students who take traditional courses. These students at this school attend class two to three days a week at at school and the rest of the time they work from home. All of their work and learning is supported by a live teacher/advisor. This situation might be ideal for certain groups of kids.
Here is the website:
http://www.rrps.net/CyberAcademy/index.htm



that program sounds incredibly interesting.  were it available when i was in high school, i would have gladly taken it!
As would I. There are students who find it easy to finish High School in two to three  years brecause all of the distractions of a regular school are absent in this environment.
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« Reply #308 on: July 06, 2010, 11:27:30 AM »

Here is the curriculum used by the Cyber Academy:

http://www.education2020.com/
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« Reply #309 on: November 06, 2010, 04:20:44 AM »

I was capable to manege home schooling so far(11 years).

It is tight for budget, but we have enough for basic needs, thanks God.

I see great deference Homeschool VS Public School.

There is no easy way to God Kingdom, only via struggle, and more kids spend time and brain washed in public school among paganism, more loos reality about truth. 

Specially in modern world where all focus on entertainment, profit and lust.
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« Reply #310 on: December 31, 2010, 03:35:17 AM »

I do not have kids at this point in my life yet, but if I did I would likely home school them. I am not opposed to public education in any sense of morality or ideology, but I think home-schooling allows for more well-rounded chilrean educated in the classics of civilization.
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« Reply #311 on: March 09, 2011, 09:41:37 AM »

I do not have kids at this point in my life yet, but if I did I would likely home school them. I am not opposed to public education in any sense of morality or ideology, but I think home-schooling allows for more well-rounded chilrean educated in the classics of civilization.

Only if the parents know what they're doing. How many parents nowadays are themselves acquainted with the classics? Much of the time home schooling parents do an even worse job than the public school teachers, and the kids end up in special ed once they go back to public school. This isn't because home schooling is a bad idea, but it's not feasible for everyone.
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« Reply #312 on: March 09, 2011, 09:46:32 AM »

I consider homeschooling to be a very dangerous thing. IMO the children kept sheltered from interactions with their peers won't gain the necessary abilities to act in a group or deal with the conflicts. I think they will have difficulties with living an adult life.
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« Reply #313 on: March 09, 2011, 11:57:08 AM »

I consider homeschooling to be a very dangerous thing. IMO the children kept sheltered from interactions with their peers won't gain the necessary abilities to act in a group or deal with the conflicts. I think they will have difficulties with living an adult life.

This can be true, but does not have to be. It would be the fault of the parent homeschooling, not the idea of homeschooling itself.

There are tons of peer groups to participate in if you're in a community of people. There should be kids at the parish, kids at the local YMCA, kids in local sports leagues, kids in reading/study groups organized by a local library, etc. Finding a nice homeschool co-op can also help.

Just don't have your kids interact with only one type of peer. This is also a homeschooling problem. Like-minded parents join up to form co-ops (usually the fundamentalist Christian types) and so you get a co-op full of fundie kids being taught fundie ideas...it's all they ever get. Expose them to different types of people and opposing worldviews. They need to know not only how to interact with others, but how to act with others that do not share their beliefs and practices about...well, almost anything.

This is especially true for the Orthodox in America. We're 1% of the U.S. population. We're growing, yes, but still a minority and will be for the foreseeable future. Maybe my grandchildren, or their children, will have a more sizeable Orthodox population, but they'll still be a minority. They should understand the truths of the Church concerning theology, asceticsm, prayer, etc. but they must understand that they are in the minority in this country, and how to properly interact with those that do not share their worldview. Without this, no matter how much "like-minded" interaction they get, they'll still be dysfunctional people.
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« Reply #314 on: March 09, 2011, 05:35:10 PM »

We homeschool our 5 children.

It has been an absolutely amazing experience.  There is nothing like watching them read and write all the while knowing that you taught them how.

Public school does not allow for open prayer.  To me this means it does not allow a child to express their faith.  God is basically not allowed.  The children do not have as many "friends" as if they attended public school, however, they do have friends none the less.

Where God is not allowed, my children will not be allowed either.

Anybody feel free to PM me for homeschooling questions etc.
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