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Author Topic: Ecumenism (a cartoon)  (Read 1474 times) Average Rating: 0
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Peter J
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« on: May 31, 2011, 05:50:50 PM »

I'm generally not much of a cartoonist; but a cartoon I saw recently, written by a traditionalist Catholic, has inspired me to come up with a variation on it.

The setting is a Catholic parish meeting. The priest says, “Here's the list of non-Catholic groups we're meeting with this week:
Monday, Astrology Enthusiasts
Tuseday, Secular Humanist Club
Wednesday, Taskforce on Feminist Theology
Thursday, Yoga and Transcendental Meditation Group
Friday, Eastern Orth- OK, who's the wise guy?”

(Could also be SSPX rather than Eastern Orthodox.)

Here's the original cartoon: http://catholiccartoonblog.blogspot.com/2010/01/diversity-yes-catholicism-no.html
« Last Edit: May 31, 2011, 05:51:35 PM by Peter J » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2011, 09:55:10 PM »

From what I have learned-mostly from a friend who was Catholic and converted to Orthodoxy-a lot of Roman Catholic clergy think the Orthodox Church is hidebound by tradition, not 'socially relevant to the moder world,' since it is not under the Pope, "a big mistake" to join it. He bore the brunt of all these criticisms when he became Orthodox ... from clergy at the Roman Catholic Seminary he attended, as well as his home parish clergy, and some other clergy he knew. This was in the 1980s, so these were not exactly 'enlightened opinions for the time.'
I read a book by a Greek Catholic man who had been imprisoned in the Soviet Union. This book came out in the 1990s; the man stated flat out, without any apology whatsoever, that the Russian Orthodox Church was "heretical," and no salvation could be found without the Pope. So, whatever 'enlightened opinions' are shared at ecumenical love fests, that does not mean they are held by many individual Catholics.
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« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2011, 04:07:44 PM »

The catholic church has lots of problems in USA.
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mwoerl
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« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2011, 08:00:50 PM »

it does have problems ... I grew up in a large catholic parish ... most parishioners were from a very wealthy and small suburb of Dayton, Ohio ... we were among the few who lived on the 'wrong side of the tracks'
most people i knew didnt seem all that interested in anyting else than "well, you gotta go to church on sunday ...."
while i was long past participation in the RC church, and this long before I became Orthodox - from the little i heard, i dont think that particular parish had any of the goofy stuff mentioned in your cartoon, nor any divisiveness over "traditionalism," etc etc

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« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2011, 08:07:17 PM »

The cartoon was funny.  Wink Cheesy
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« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2011, 08:13:22 PM »

I'm generally not much of a cartoonist; but a cartoon I saw recently, written by a traditionalist Catholic, has inspired me to come up with a variation on it.

The setting is a Catholic parish meeting. The priest says, “Here's the list of non-Catholic groups we're meeting with this week:
Monday, Astrology Enthusiasts
Tuseday, Secular Humanist Club
Wednesday, Taskforce on Feminist Theology
Thursday, Yoga and Transcendental Meditation Group
Friday, Eastern Orth- OK, who's the wise guy?”

(Could also be SSPX rather than Eastern Orthodox.)

Here's the original cartoon: http://catholiccartoonblog.blogspot.com/2010/01/diversity-yes-catholicism-no.html

Seems to me that you are having problems in being a catholic.
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« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2011, 08:19:38 PM »

it does have problems ... I grew up in a large catholic parish ... most parishioners were from a very wealthy and small suburb of Dayton, Ohio ... we were among the few who lived on the 'wrong side of the tracks'
most people i knew didnt seem all that interested in anyting else than "well, you gotta go to church on sunday ...."
while i was long past participation in the RC church, and this long before I became Orthodox - from the little i heard, i dont think that particular parish had any of the goofy stuff mentioned in your cartoon, nor any divisiveness over "traditionalism," etc etc


Which suburb, if you don't mind my asking? (I've spent all my life in Dayton, so my curiosity is piqued whenever I'm reminded that I'm not alone here.)
« Last Edit: June 01, 2011, 08:22:04 PM by That person » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2011, 09:06:37 PM »

The cartoon was funny.  Wink Cheesy

But not as funny as my modified version of it, right?
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Robb
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« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2011, 02:10:01 AM »

it does have problems ... I grew up in a large catholic parish ... most parishioners were from a very wealthy and small suburb of Dayton, Ohio ... we were among the few who lived on the 'wrong side of the tracks'
most people i knew didn't seem all that interested in anyting else than "well, you gotta go to church on sunday ...."
while i was long past participation in the RC church, and this long before I became Orthodox - from the little i heard, i don't think that particular parish had any of the goofy stuff mentioned in your cartoon, nor any divisiveness over "traditionalism," etc etc



I think that you could find these same types of people in any Christian denomination, not necessarily the RCC.  You can also find loads of enthusiastic converts who claim to take their religion seriously and hold disdain for those who they feel haven't reached their spiritual level of thinking.  I try not to pass judgment on my fellow Catholics and what level of spiritual life they lead.  We, myself included are all imperfect creatures.  There are plenty of spiritual things which I am not so far progressed on and there are also things of a spiritual nature which my fellow RC's may have and I lack.

If a lot of RC's see the Orthodox as spiritually "backwards" that has less to do with arrogance and more with differing styles and attitudes towards religion.  The Orthodox emphasis tradition and mysticism more and try to keep their Church as much as possible like the ancient, first millennium Christianity.  The RCC on the other hand has always tinkered with and changed her liturgies, theology, and disciplines in order to appear more relevant and in keeping with the times.  There is more of a sense of being "up to date" and trying to connect with the world and the currents of thought that are running through it within Catholicism.  This has been the way of things in the RCC for nearly a millennium and it continues to (With a few exceptions on certain moral concepts) To be the guiding light of the Vatican for future generations to come.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2011, 02:11:34 AM by Robb » Logged

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Peter J
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« Reply #9 on: June 06, 2011, 11:41:14 AM »

I'm generally not much of a cartoonist; but a cartoon I saw recently, written by a traditionalist Catholic, has inspired me to come up with a variation on it.

The setting is a Catholic parish meeting. The priest says, “Here's the list of non-Catholic groups we're meeting with this week:
Monday, Astrology Enthusiasts
Tuseday, Secular Humanist Club
Wednesday, Taskforce on Feminist Theology
Thursday, Yoga and Transcendental Meditation Group
Friday, Eastern Orth- OK, who's the wise guy?”

(Could also be SSPX rather than Eastern Orthodox.)

Here's the original cartoon: http://catholiccartoonblog.blogspot.com/2010/01/diversity-yes-catholicism-no.html

Seems to me that you are having problems in being a catholic.

I would say that traditional Catholics in general have trouble "being Catholic", at least in the eyes of some. Why would I be any different?
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Peter J
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« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2011, 05:34:09 PM »

On the Lifting of the Excommunications

Quote
Fr Alexandre Siniakov, Russian Orthodox priest and French coordinator for relations between the Russian Orthodox Church and other churches:

    We can only but rejoice that there were steps in the Eucharistic communion between the the FSSPX bishops and Pope Benedict XVI. [...]

    I was surprised to find that absence of solidarity of some Catholics in relation to the decision of the pope. He did nothing more than exercise his ministry of unity, it is a little sad to see that it divides the Catholic Church. I believe that, for their part, the Russian Orthodox media perceived rather positively the lifting of the excommunications. It does not seem to us that the Pope wants to settle with the tradition of Vatican II [...]

    From our perspective reforms cannot be imposed on the faithful, without the clear consensus and full reception of the people of God. It would do violence to Christ's body. The Russian Church knows of schism for liturgical reasons; after the Council of 1666-1667. This is the schism of the Old Believers. The reforms were much less important than the Second Vatican Council's. But excommunications were launched at the era and schism endures forever. In 1970, the Moscow Patriarchiate, at the initiative of Metropolitan Nicodemus (Rotova), lifted these excommunications and anathemas; it was too late. I humbly believe that the pope had a reason: rapidly lift the excommunication so that schism does not endure.

(That might be a translation.)
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