Author Topic: English summary of my master thesis  (Read 543 times)

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Offline Dominika

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English summary of my master thesis
« on: June 25, 2018, 07:55:56 PM »
Finally, I've managed to finish my master thesis, "Arabic Orthodox terminology". 447 pages (the record under this promoter used to 230 pages). Thanks God that a reviewer has been found (as only reviewers of Phd thesis are paid). And, generally, praise be God, that despite not always easy circumstances, I managed to do it. The second name of this thesis should be "Overgrowth of ambition" ;)

Anyway, there is the summary, that's a translation from the Polish original:
The thesis has a form of lexicon; it contains the most popular and the most terms in the Orthodox theological, liturgical, hymnographical and customary tradition. It refers strictly to the Byzantine rite, that in the Middle East in the Arabic context is called “Rum Orthodox” in order to distinguish it from Oriental Orthodox traditions, such as Coptic or Syriac. This terminology is used in the Eastern Orthodox patriarchates of Antioch and Jerusalem – that is, the ones in which the believers are Arabs and arabised Arameans – and to a small extent in the Alexandrian Patriarchate in which the faithful are mainly Greeks and Africans, and in small percentage Arabs.

The chapters and subsections are in the thematic order, while inside them the order is alphabetical of the terms in Polish. Every Arabic term is given in the original writing and scientific transcription; after that there is an interpretation and commentary, e.g. if the word is of Arabic or foreign origin. In most cases there is put at least one example of the term having been used, so that with some explanations enables the Reader familiarisation not only with the Arabic Orthodox terminology and its specifics, but also with the teaching and traditions of the Orthodox Church. The sources of the terms are various: Bible, liturgical books, sermons, articles, entries in the Internet within activities of the patriarchates of Antioch and Jerusalem. All this aims giving the most possibly full representation. The sources proceed, above all, from 20th and 21st centuries, however it should not be forgotten that the liturgical books used here are copies of much more earlier publications, as the Orthodox Church undergoes changes to a small extent; changes in wording in Bible or certain hymns that differ from the ones that are well-established by tradition and time would face a great resistance from the monkhood and laity. Under most of the terms there are given their equivalents in Greek, Church Slavonic and English; they are not interpreted, their purpose is just comparative and filling up the context. Some of the terms in the Polish section are also written in Church Slavonic or close to it variant because of their functioning that sometimes is even more frequent that of the Polish expressions in the Polish Orthodox society. In the end there are placed indexes of the terms in Polish and English.

Basically, there are two goals of this thesis. The first is to show that Arabic language and believers using it have been inseparable part of the universal Church for ages and, similarly, Orthodoxy itself is an element of the mosaic of the Arabic world. Secondly, the thesis is thought to be a helpful tool in reading Arabic texts set in the Orthodox context and the ones written by authors proceeding from this tradition, the texts both historical and new, that are being made every day, e.g. in the Internet.


I'm waiting for your suggestions, comments, corrections etc.
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Offline hecma925

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Re: English summary of my master thesis
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2018, 08:05:24 PM »
I'm too dumb to make a suggestion, but it seems very interesting.
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Re: English summary of my master thesis
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2018, 10:52:15 PM »
What a great theme, congratulation!

There are some stuff there that I would have phrased different FWIW, I'll just point them out and, if I'm wrong, our natives posters should correct me. Take my suggestions with a pinch of salt...

and in small percentage Arabs
I would have written ", and, in a small percentage, Arabs".

Quote
The chapters and subsections are in the thematic order
I'd have snipped "the" in "in the thematic order".

Quote
In most cases there is put at least one example of the term having been used
"Put" could be snipped here. You're probably right, but since it looks quite different to me, I'm pointing it out regardless.

Quote
so that with some explanations enables the Reader familiarisation
"Enables" sounds a bit misplaced. I suggest "so that, with some explanations, the reader is familiarised"

Quote
The sources of the terms are various: Bible
Quote
changes in wording in Bible
"Bible" usually comes with a definite article in English when you're referring to the text instead of a singular unit.

Quote
All this aims giving the most possibly full representation.
Maybe "aims to give", but you're probably right.

Quote
much more earlier publications
"Much earlier".

Quote
filling up the context
I presume this is a fixed expression in Polish, but it sounds a bit off to me in English, personally.

Quote
The first is to show that Arabic language and believers using it have been inseparable part
I'd write "an inseparable part".
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Offline Brilko

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Re: English summary of my master thesis
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2018, 01:37:35 AM »
This is a quick and dirty attempt on my part. I may have misunderstood what you were trying to say in the bits that I changed. I was stumped on the red stuff.

Red 1: Is there some type of lexicon attached to the thesis as “has a form of” suggests to me? If the thesis is a lexicon, “This lexicon contains...” or “This thesis is in the form of a lexicon...” (to be more convoluted).

Red 2: Are the Arabic terms given in Arabic script and scientific notation? I find “original writings” to be odd. (I have no idea what scientific notation would be for Arabic terms.)

Red 3: I don’t know what this is supposed to mean. No idea what to do with it.

The thesis has a form of lexicon; it contains the terms used most often in the Orthodox theological, liturgical, hymnographical and customary tradition. It refers strictly to the Byzantine rite, that in the Middle East in the Arabic context is called “Rum Orthodox” in order to distinguish it from Oriental Orthodox traditions, such as Coptic or Syriac. This terminology is used in the Eastern Orthodox patriarchates of Antioch and Jerusalem – that is, the ones in which the believers are Arabs and arabised Arameans – and to a small extent in the Alexandrian Patriarchate in which the faithful are mainly Greeks and Africans, and a small percentage Arabs.

The chapters and subsections are in thematic order, while inside them the terms are in Polish alphabetical order. Every Arabic term is given in the original writing and scientific transcription; after that there is an interpretation and commentary, e.g. if the word is of Arabic or foreign origin. In most cases there is at least one example of the term’s usage in order to familiarize the reader, not only with the Arabic Orthodox terminology and its specifics, but also with the teaching and traditions of the Orthodox Church. The sources of the terms are various: The Bible, liturgical books, sermons, articles, and Internet articles from the patriarchates of Antioch and Jerusalem. All this aims giving the most possibly full representation. The sources proceed, above all, from 20th and 21st centuries, however it should not be forgotten that the liturgical books used here are copies of much earlier publications, as the Orthodox Church undergoes very few changes.  Changes in the Bible, or certain hymns, that differs from the well-established tradition would face great resistance from the monks and the laity. Equivalents in Greek, Church Slavonic and English are given under most of the terms. They are not interpreted. Their purpose is for comparison and additional context. Some of the terms in the Polish section are also written in Church Slavonic, or a close variant, because Polish Orthodox society sometimes uses them more frequently than the Polish terms. At the end, are indexes of the terms in Polish and English.

There are two goals of this thesis. First, to show that the Arabic language, and believers using it, have been an inseparable part of the universal Church for ages and Orthodoxy is part of the mosaic of the Arabic world. Second, to be a helpful tool for reading Arabic texts set in the Orthodox context and written by authors proceeding from this tradition. Not only texts from the past, but also new texts that are being written every day.

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Re: English summary of my master thesis
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2018, 11:28:49 AM »
You did a well decent job at this paper Dominika
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Offline FinnJames

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Re: English summary of my master thesis
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2018, 11:40:18 PM »
Dominica, this isn't very helpful to you, I know, but I'm wondering how/why you chose this particular thesis topic. Are there many Arabic-speaking Eastern Orthodox Christians in Poland? Do you have Arabic-speaking relatives?

Offline Dominika

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Re: English summary of my master thesis
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2018, 04:24:00 PM »
Since I had to upload this summary into the system, thank you for the help and nice words :)



Dominica, this isn't very helpful to you, I know, but I'm wondering how/why you chose this particular thesis topic.
Because the topic, despite being quite important, it's not know at all in Poland and generally Slavic countries. To some extend it applies also to other countries, because, as it seems, nobody has done such work in the world; there have been only general (not only EO) lexicons of Christian Arabic (sometimes without making difference between rites and denominations, and without examples. Instead, there have been some of Syriac terminology, I think of Coptic and Geez too.
Reading some prayers and hymns in Arabic and translating sermons of Arab EO bishops into Polish I've noticed some interesting pecularities, so I decided to write about this above 2 years ago ;)

Are there many Arabic-speaking Eastern Orthodox Christians in Poland? Do you have Arabic-speaking relatives?
I'm not aware of any EO Arab there. Only 3 OO Syriacs. We're not attractive land to the emigrants beside Ukrainians and Czechens.

Do you have Arabic-speaking relatives?
I do not have any.
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My Orthodox liturgical blog "For what eat, while you can fast" in Polish (videos featuring chants in different languages)