Author Topic: English summary of my (potential) lecture  (Read 760 times)

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Offline Dominika

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English summary of my (potential) lecture
« on: January 09, 2018, 03:11:55 PM »
I'm going to propose a lecture in a conference in May, and I was obliged to write its summary also in English. It's a translation from the Polish summary, please, see if it's corret (for sure there are some mistakes):

       Arabs were embracing Christianity from first centuries of its existence. Most of Arameans, in consequence of arabisation that started after the rise of Islam, began to call themselves “Arabs”.

      Orthodox Arabs and Arameans have contributed a lot into Byzantine rite over the centuries. However, they have been also influenced by external factors, mainly Greek ones, and, later, Western European. Because of this mix both in the liturgical and folkloric spheres, some characteristic customs and rites have appeared. Due to the rule of the autocephaly – that is said, independence – of the Orthodox local Churches, maintenance of these specifics is possible.

       Currently both of these groups – Arabs and arabised Aramenas – are faithful, among others, of the Orthodox patriarchates of Antioch and Jerusalem and – to minimal extent – of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria. Together they make the idea of “Arab Orthodoxy” which despite unfavourable circumstances still to exist and develop, above all in Syria, Lebanon, Palestine and Jordan. Moreover, it has influence on Orthodoxy in far regions, especially in Latin America and USA, in which believers from these patriarchates found their own parishes, and via this they evangelise other nations and transmit their traditions to them.

     The lecture, enriched by photos and short videos, aims to present living heritage of Arab Orthodoxy in cultivated its liturgical and folkloric traditions in the native terrains.
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Offline Iconodule

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Re: English summary of my (potential) lecture
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2018, 03:41:25 PM »
Corrections or suggestions in bold. Not everything is wrong, per se, but just could be a little smoother for a native Anglophone.

I'm going to propose a lecture in a conference in May, and I was obliged to write its summary also in English. It's a translation from the Polish summary, please, see if it's corret (for sure there are some mistakes):

       Arabs were embracing Christianity from first centuries of its existence. Most of Arameans, in consequence of arabisation that started after the rise of Islam, began to call themselves “Arabs”.

      Orthodox Arabs and Arameans have contributed a lot to the Byzantine rite over the centuries. However, they have also been influenced by external factors, mainly Greek ones, and, later, Western European. Because of this mix both in the liturgical and folkloric spheres, some characteristic customs and rites have appeared. Due to the rule of the autocephaly – that  to say, independence – of the Orthodox local Churches, maintenance of these specifics is possible.

       Currently both of these groups – Arabs and arabised Arameans – areamong the faithful of the Orthodox patriarchates of Antioch and Jerusalem and – to a minimal extent – of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria. Together they make up the idea of “Arab Orthodoxy” which, despite unfavourable circumstances, still exists and develops, above all in Syria, Lebanon, Palestine and Jordan. Moreover, it has influence on Orthodoxy in distant regions, especially in Latin America and USA, in which believers from these patriarchates have founded their own parishes, and in this wayevangelise other nations and transmit their traditions to them.

     The lecture, enriched by photos and short videos, aims to present theliving heritage of Arab Orthodoxy andits liturgical and folkloric traditions as cultivatedin its native terrain.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2018, 03:42:40 PM by Iconodule »
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Offline RaphaCam

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Re: English summary of my (potential) lecture
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2018, 06:30:49 PM »
Some added minor suggestions to Iconodule's correction, take it with a pint of salt, since I'm not native either:

Corrections or suggestions in bold. Not everything is wrong, per se, but just could be a little smoother for a native Anglophone.

I'm going to propose a lecture in a conference in May, and I was obliged to write its summary also in English. It's a translation from the Polish summary, please, see if it's corret (for sure there are some mistakes):

       Arabs were embracing Christianity from first centuries of its existence. Most Arameans, as a consequence of an arabisation that started after the rise of Islam, began to call themselves “Arabs”.

      Orthodox Arabs and Arameans have contributed a lot to the Byzantine rite over the centuries. However, they have also been influenced by external factors, mainly Greek, and, later, Western European. Because of this mix both in the liturgical and folkloric spheres, some characteristic customs and rites have appeared. Due to the rule of autocephaly – that is to say, independence – of the Orthodox local Churches, maintenance of these specifics is possible.

       Currently both of these groups – Arabs and arabised Arameans – are among the faithful of the Orthodox patriarchates of Antioch and Jerusalem and – to a minimal extent – of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria. Together they make up the idea of “Arab Orthodoxy” which, despite unfavourable circumstances, still exists and develops, above all in Syria, Lebanon, Palestine and Jordan. Moreover, it has influence on Orthodoxy in distant regions, especially in Latin America and USA, in which believers from these patriarchates have founded their own parishes, and in this way evangelise other nations and transmit their traditions to them.

     The lecture, enriched by photos and short videos, aims to present theliving heritage of Arab Orthodoxy and its liturgical and folkloric traditions as cultivated in its native terrain.
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Offline Ainnir

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Re: English summary of my (potential) lecture
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2018, 06:44:12 PM »
All great suggestions; my changes are tiny.  Sounds like  a great topic!

Some added minor suggestions to Iconodule's correction, take it with a pint of salt, since I'm not native either:

Corrections or suggestions in bold. Not everything is wrong, per se, but just could be a little smoother for a native Anglophone.

I'm going to propose a lecture in a conference in May, and I was obliged to write its summary also in English. It's a translation from the Polish summary, please, see if it's corret (for sure there are some mistakes):

       Arabs were embracing Christianity from the first centuries of its existence. Most Arameans, as a consequence of an arabisation that started after the rise of Islam, began to call themselves “Arabs”.

      Orthodox Arabs and Arameans have contributed a lot to the Byzantine rite over the centuries. However, they have also been influenced by external factors, mainly Greek, and later, Western European. Because of this mix, both in the liturgical and folkloric spheres, some characteristic customs and rites have appeared. Due to the rule of autocephaly – that is to say, independence – of the Orthodox local Churches, maintenance of these specifics is possible.

       Currently both of these groups – Arabs and arabised Arameans – are among the faithful of the Orthodox patriarchates of Antioch and Jerusalem and – to a minimal extent – of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria. Together they make up the idea of “Arab Orthodoxy” which, despite unfavourable circumstances, still exists and develops, above all in Syria, Lebanon, Palestine and Jordan. Moreover, it has influence on Orthodoxy in distant regions, especially Latin America and USA, in which believers from these patriarchates have founded their own parishes, and in this way evangelise other nations and transmit their traditions to them.

     The lecture, enriched by photos and short videos, aims to present the living heritage of Arab Orthodoxy and its liturgical and folkloric traditions as cultivated in its native terrain.

« Last Edit: January 09, 2018, 06:50:23 PM by Ainnir »
Is any of the above Orthodox?  I have no clue, so there's that.

Offline Dominika

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Re: English summary of my (potential) lecture
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2018, 06:52:30 AM »
Thank you all guys so much! :)
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